Build Advice First time builder --- are these parts compatible?

Xxfyrus

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Aug 26, 2016
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Hello!

I am looking to build my first PC (I am incredibly nervous doing this by the way).

I have picked out parts but I want to make absolutely sure they are compatible. The point of getting some of the parts I have picked out is to somewhat "future" proof my computer so I dont have to tinker around with it much in the near future. I also am aware that the next intel gen is coming soon, so I do not know if I should do this or AMD. I have seen better performance for gaming on intel, which is why I picked what I did.

Also, I have a GTX 1080 that I will be switching from my current computer to the new one once it is built. I however, am going to buy a new GPU when ever it comes in stock.

Case: https://www.newegg.com/white-corsair-icue-5000x-rgb-atx-mid-tower/p/N82E16811139165?&quicklink=true
CPU: https://www.newegg.com/intel-core-i7-10700k-core-i7-10th-gen/p/N82E16819118123?Description=i7 10700k&cm_re=i7_10700k--19-118-123--Product&quicklink=true
Motherboard: https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16813119370?Description=asus z590&cm_re=asus_z590--13-119-370--Product&quicklink=true
RAM https://www.newegg.com/corsair-16gb-288-pin-ddr4-sdram/p/N82E16820236416?Description=corsair RAM&cm_re=corsair_RAM--20-236-416--Product&quicklink=true
SSD: https://www.newegg.com/samsung-970-evo-1tb/p/N82E16820147691?Description=samsung 970 evo&cm_re=samsung_970 evo--20-147-691--Product&quicklink=true
PSU: https://www.newegg.com/corsair-rmx-series-rm850x-cp-9020180-na-850w/p/N82E16817139234?Description=850w psu corsair&cm_re=850w_psu corsair--17-139-234--Product&quicklink=true
CPU HeatSink: https://www.newegg.com/cryorig-h5-universal/p/13C-000U-00004?Description=cpu heatsink&cm_re=cpu_heatsink--13C-000U-00004--Product&quicklink=true

Thank you very much for your help. I really appreciate it.
 
I'm located in the U.S. I'd like to keep the budget around 1200, not including the gpu since I don't know when more will be in stock
You can do better without compromising quality...

PCPartPicker Part List

Type|Item|Price
:----|:----|:----
CPU | Intel Core i9-10850K 3.6 GHz 10-Core Processor | $399.99 @ Newegg
CPU Cooler | Deepcool ASSASSIN III 90.37 CFM CPU Cooler | $89.99 @ B&H
Memory | G.Skill Trident Z 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory | $136.99 @ Amazon
Storage | HP EX950 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive | $124.99 @ Newegg
Case | Corsair 275R Airflow ATX Mid Tower Case | $79.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply | SeaSonic FOCUS 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply | $109.99 @ B&H
Custom| ASUS TUF Gaming Z590-Plus WiFi 6, LGA 1200 (Intel 11th/10th Gen) ATX Gaming| $259.00
| Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts |
| Total | $1200.93
| Generated by PCPartPicker 2021-02-19 11:57 EST-0500 |
 
Good job in selecting parts.
It is all compatible and will work.

One can quibble about brands and such.

Hold on to that 1080, graphics card upgrades are hard to find at any reasonable price.

Leaked benchmarks indicate that intel 11th gen processors will have a 19% improvement in instructions per clock(IPC) That is most important for games.
I would defer on the processor until 11th gen launches.
I suspect good availability and equivalent pricing on the i7-11700K.
Intel has done this in the past. Same price, better performance.
Avoid the KF versions without integrated graphics.
The small price premium of K is worth it for diagnosing graphics and monitor issues.

Today, I also ordered a Z590 motherboard in anticipation.
I did not want to find my selected motherboard out of stock at launch time.
If 11th gen proves disappointing, I can always fall back on 10th gen which is quite available.

I am planning on reusing my noctua NH-D15s:
https://www.newegg.com/noctua-nh-d15s/p/N82E16835608072
It comes in black at a hefty price premium.
Not worth it to me.

FWIW:
MY build process:

Before anything, while waiting for your parts to be delivered, download
and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manual.
Buy a #2 magnetic tip philips screwdriver.
I find it handy to buy a power switch like this for testing.
https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16812119009?Description=power switch&cm_re=power_switch-_-12-119-009-_-Product&quicklink=true
1. I assemble the critical parts outside of the case.
That lets me test them for functionality easily.
A wood table or cardboard is fine.
2. Plug in only the necessary parts at first. Ram, cpu, cooler, psu.
Do not force anything. Parts fit only one way.
Attach a monitor to the integrated motherboard adapter if you have one, otherwise to the graphics card.
  1. If your motherboard does not have a PWR button, momentarily touch the two pwr front panel pins with a flat blade screwdriver.
  2. Repeatedly hit F2 or DEL, and that should get you into the bios display.
  3. Boot from a cd or usb stick with memtest86 on it. memtest will exercise your ram and cpu functionality.
  4. Install windows.
  5. Install the motherboard cd drivers. Particularly the lan drivers so you can access the internet.
Do not select the easy install option, or you will get a bunch of utilities and trialware that you don't want. Drivers only.
  1. Connect to the internet and install an antivirus program. Microsoft defender is free, easy, and unobtrusive.
  2. Install your graphics card and driver if you tested with integrated graphics.
You will need to remove the graphics card later to install your motherboard in the case.
As a tip when screwing the motherboard into the posts, give the screw a small counterclockwise turn until you feel a click.
That lets you know that the screw will engage properly.
Make a note of how the graphics card latches into the pcie slot.
The mechanism will be hidden under the card and may be difficult to work if you have not previously checked how.
  1. Update windows to currency.
  2. Only now do I take apart what I need to and install it in the case.
  3. Now is the time to reinstall your graphics card.
 
Hello!

I am looking to build my first PC (I am incredibly nervous doing this by the way).

I have picked out parts but I want to make absolutely sure they are compatible. The point of getting some of the parts I have picked out is to somewhat "future" proof my computer so I dont have to tinker around with it much in the near future. I also am aware that the next intel gen is coming soon, so I do not know if I should do this or AMD. I have seen better performance for gaming on intel, which is why I picked what I did.

Also, I have a GTX 1080 that I will be switching from my current computer to the new one once it is built. I however, am going to buy a new GPU when ever it comes in stock.

Case: https://www.newegg.com/white-corsair-icue-5000x-rgb-atx-mid-tower/p/N82E16811139165?&quicklink=true
CPU: https://www.newegg.com/intel-core-i7-10700k-core-i7-10th-gen/p/N82E16819118123?Description=i7 10700k&cm_re=i7_10700k--19-118-123--Product&quicklink=true
Motherboard: https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16813119370?Description=asus z590&cm_re=asus_z590--13-119-370--Product&quicklink=true
RAM https://www.newegg.com/corsair-16gb-288-pin-ddr4-sdram/p/N82E16820236416?Description=corsair RAM&cm_re=corsair_RAM--20-236-416--Product&quicklink=true
SSD: https://www.newegg.com/samsung-970-evo-1tb/p/N82E16820147691?Description=samsung 970 evo&cm_re=samsung_970 evo--20-147-691--Product&quicklink=true
PSU: https://www.newegg.com/corsair-rmx-series-rm850x-cp-9020180-na-850w/p/N82E16817139234?Description=850w psu corsair&cm_re=850w_psu corsair--17-139-234--Product&quicklink=true
CPU HeatSink: https://www.newegg.com/cryorig-h5-universal/p/13C-000U-00004?Description=cpu heatsink&cm_re=cpu_heatsink--13C-000U-00004--Product&quicklink=true

Thank you very much for your help. I really appreciate it.
Solid build but like has already been stated on here, Intel 11th gen. Rocket Lake cpu's are due for release March 15th. Those cpu's paired with a Z590, B560 or H570 board gives you native support of 3200MHz RAM, PCIe 4 along with improved IPC not to mention those cpu's are expected to be priced similar to the current 10th gen. Comet Lake cpu's.

https://hexus.net/tech/news/cpu/147437-intel-rocket-lake-hard-launch-tipped-monday-15th-march/
Intel Rocket Lake hard launch tipped for Monday 15th March

Here's some cost cutters worth having a look at.

https://www.newegg.com/p/pl?N=100007583 600545969 50001375
LIAN LI LANCOOL II MESH RGB WHITE Tempered Glass ATX Case - White Color - LANCOOL II MESH RGB-W $114.99

https://lian-li.com/product/lancool-ii-mesh-rgb/

https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16813157983
ASRock Z590 EXTREME WIFI 6E $224.99

https://www.asrock.com/MB/Intel/Z590 Extreme WiFi 6E/index.asp

https://www.newegg.com/seasonic-focus-gm-series-focus-gm-850-750w/p/N82E16817151231
Seasonic FOCUS GM-850, 850W 80+ Gold, Semi-Modular, Fan Control in Silent and Cooling Mode, 7 Year Warranty $129.99

https://www.newegg.com/ballistix-16gb-288-pin-ddr4-sdram/p/N82E16820164198
Crucial Ballistix 3200 MHz DDR4 DRAM Desktop Gaming Memory Kit 16GB (8GBx2) CL16 BL2K8G32C16U4W (WHITE) $79.99

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lfxuqjt38dA
 
Last edited:
Leaked benchmarks indicate that intel 11th gen processors will have a 19% improvement in instructions per clock(IPC) That is most important for games.
Instructions per clock improvements can affect different workloads differently though. The Ryzen 5000-series processors, for example, saw what is typically around a 20-25% IPC improvement in CPU-limited games compared the prior 3000 series, but only around a 10-15% improvement in most other non-gaming applications. By contrast, the 3000-series saw larger gains in application performance than in games. Even if Intel's Rocket Lake CPUs manage an IPC improvement like that in a particular application benchmark, there's no guarantee that gaming performance will see any significant improvement. I agree that it's probably worth waiting to see what they have to offer at this point though, unless one needs a new system right away, since they will likely launch around the end of next month.
 

Xxfyrus

Reputable
Aug 26, 2016
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3
4,535
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Good job in selecting parts.
It is all compatible and will work.

One can quibble about brands and such.

Hold on to that 1080, graphics card upgrades are hard to find at any reasonable price.

Leaked benchmarks indicate that intel 11th gen processors will have a 19% improvement in instructions per clock(IPC) That is most important for games.
I would defer on the processor until 11th gen launches.
I suspect good availability and equivalent pricing on the i7-11700K.
Intel has done this in the past. Same price, better performance.
Avoid the KF versions without integrated graphics.
The small price premium of K is worth it for diagnosing graphics and monitor issues.

Today, I also ordered a Z590 motherboard in anticipation.
I did not want to find my selected motherboard out of stock at launch time.
If 11th gen proves disappointing, I can always fall back on 10th gen which is quite available.

I am planning on reusing my noctua NH-D15s:
https://www.newegg.com/noctua-nh-d15s/p/N82E16835608072
It comes in black at a hefty price premium.
Not worth it to me.

FWIW:
MY build process:

Before anything, while waiting for your parts to be delivered, download
and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manual.
Buy a #2 magnetic tip philips screwdriver.
I find it handy to buy a power switch like this for testing.
https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16812119009?Description=power switch&cm_re=power_switch--12-119-009--Product&quicklink=true
1. I assemble the critical parts outside of the case.
That lets me test them for functionality easily.
A wood table or cardboard is fine.
2. Plug in only the necessary parts at first. Ram, cpu, cooler, psu.
Do not force anything. Parts fit only one way.
Attach a monitor to the integrated motherboard adapter if you have one, otherwise to the graphics card.
  1. If your motherboard does not have a PWR button, momentarily touch the two pwr front panel pins with a flat blade screwdriver.
  2. Repeatedly hit F2 or DEL, and that should get you into the bios display.
  3. Boot from a cd or usb stick with memtest86 on it. memtest will exercise your ram and cpu functionality.
  4. Install windows.
  5. Install the motherboard cd drivers. Particularly the lan drivers so you can access the internet.
Do not select the easy install option, or you will get a bunch of utilities and trialware that you don't want. Drivers only.
  1. Connect to the internet and install an antivirus program. Microsoft defender is free, easy, and unobtrusive.
  2. Install your graphics card and driver if you tested with integrated graphics.
You will need to remove the graphics card later to install your motherboard in the case.
As a tip when screwing the motherboard into the posts, give the screw a small counterclockwise turn until you feel a click.
That lets you know that the screw will engage properly.
Make a note of how the graphics card latches into the pcie slot.
The mechanism will be hidden under the card and may be difficult to work if you have not previously checked how.
  1. Update windows to currency.
  2. Only now do I take apart what I need to and install it in the case.
  3. Now is the time to reinstall your graphics card.
I am actually going to buy the motherboard right now and wait for the next gen intel. I think that'll make sense in the long run. I'd hate to buy a 10th gen and then the new one comes out in a few weeks.

One of the main things I'm worried about is installing windows. I do not have a key because I bought the system I have prebuilt in 2012.
 

Xxfyrus

Reputable
Aug 26, 2016
71
3
4,535
0
Instructions per clock improvements can affect different workloads differently though. The Ryzen 5000-series processors, for example, saw what is typically around a 20-25% IPC improvement in CPU-limited games compared the prior 3000 series, but only around a 10-15% improvement in most other non-gaming applications. By contrast, the 3000-series saw larger gains in application performance than in games. Even if Intel's Rocket Lake CPUs manage an IPC improvement like that in a particular application benchmark, there's no guarantee that gaming performance will see any significant improvement. I agree that it's probably worth waiting to see what they have to offer at this point though, unless one needs a new system right away, since they will likely launch around the end of next month.
I ended up choosing this MOBO instead. I hope it's still compatible with the other parts I chose, but dont see why It wouldnt be
 

Xxfyrus

Reputable
Aug 26, 2016
71
3
4,535
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I ended up choosing this MOBO instead. I hope it's still compatible with the other parts I chose, but dont see why It wouldnt be
I ended up buying the MOBO i had listed originally since it came with wifi on the board. I also chose a different case because the one I had posted went up in price. I also chose a different power supply. I opted to go for a 1000w EVGA supply.

This is the new case I chose: https://www.newegg.com/white-phanteks-eclipse-p500a-atx-mid-tower/p/N82E16811854100?Item=N82E16811854100

Today I bought the:
- Case
-PSU
-RAM
-MOBO
-1TB NVMe SSD

So all I need now I think is the CPU, CPU cooler, new GPU and windows
 

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