G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

My wife installed and uses Gator because the auto filling and remembering
passwords etc. Can someone tell me how to set up XP to automatically
remember passwords and fill in forms etc so I can remove this vile Program
{gator} and still keep the wife happy? Many thanks


JCW
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

JCW wrote:
> My wife installed and uses Gator because the auto filling and remembering
> passwords etc. Can someone tell me how to set up XP to automatically
> remember passwords and fill in forms etc so I can remove this vile Program
> {gator} and still keep the wife happy? Many thanks
>
>
> JCW
>
>

I commend you for wanting to rid your computer of Gator, but think that
you need to rethink the idea of replacing it with something else. From
a security point of view, using any software product to remember
passwords is a very risky thing to do. The right piece of malware can
than easily make your passwords available to just about whomever wants
them. Think of it like locking your house whenever you go out, but
leaving the key in the lock: an exercise in futility and an open
invitation to all comers. If your wife cannot or will not learn to
remember a few passwords, you might want to think about introducing her
to the combination of pen and paper. At least that way, someone would
first have to get physical access to the computer to exploit them.

To deal with issues caused by any sort of "adware" and/or
"spyware,"such as Gator, Comet Cursors, Smiley Central, Xupiter,
Bonzai Buddy, or KaZaA, and their remnants, that you've deliberately
(but without understanding the consequences) installed, two products
that are quite effective (at finding and removing this type of
scumware) are Ad-Aware from www.lavasoft.de and SpyBot Search &
Destroy from www.safer-networking.org/. Both have free versions.
It's even possible to use SpyBot Search & Destroy to "immunize" your
system against most future intrusions. I use both and generally
perform manual scans every week or so to clean out cookies, etc.

Additionally, manual removal instructions for the most common
varieties of scumware are available here:

PC Hell Spyware and Adware Removal Help
http://www.pchell.com/support/spyware.shtml


Neither adware nor spyware, collectively known as scumware,
magically install themselves on anyone's computer. They are almost
always deliberately installed by the computer's user, as part of some
allegedly "free" service or product.

While there are some unscrupulous malware distributors out there,
who do attempt to install and exploit malware without consent, the
majority of them simply rely upon the intellectual laziness and
gullibility of the average consumer, counting on them to quickly click
past the EULA in his/her haste to get the latest in "free" cutesy
cursors, screensavers, "utilities," and/or wallpapers.

If you were to read the EULAs that accompany, and to which the
computer user must agree before the download/installation of the
"screensaver" continues, most adware and spyware, you'll find that
they _do_ have the consumer's permission to do exactly what they're
doing. In the overwhelming majority of cases, computer users have no
one to blame but themselves.

There are several essential components to computer security: a
knowledgeable and pro-active user, a properly configured firewall,
reliable and up-to-date antivirus software, and the prompt repair (via
patches, hotfixes, or service packs) of any known vulnerabilities.

The weakest link in this "equation" is, of course, the computer
user. No software manufacturer can -- nor should they be expected
to -- protect the computer user from him/herself. All too many people
have bought into the various PC/software manufacturers marketing
claims of easy computing. They believe that their computer should be
no harder to use than a toaster oven; they have neither the
inclination or desire to learn how to safely use their computer. All
too few people keep their antivirus software current, install patches
in a timely manner, or stop to really think about that cutesy link
they're about to click.

Firewalls and anti-virus applications, which should always be used
and should always be running, are important components of "safe hex,"
but they cannot, and should not be expected to, protect the computer
user from him/herself. Ultimately, it is incumbent upon each and
every computer user to learn how to secure his/her own computer.


To learn more about practicing "safe hex," start with these links:

Protect Your PC
http://www.microsoft.com/security/protect/default.asp

Home Computer Security
http://www.cert.org/homeusers/HomeComputerSecurity/

List of Antivirus Software Vendors
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;49500

Home PC Firewall Guide
http://www.firewallguide.com/

Scumware.com
http://www.scumware.com/

--

Bruce Chambers

Help us help you:
http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
both at once. - RAH
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 09:17:11 -0800, JCW wrote:

> My wife installed and uses Gator because the auto filling and remembering
> passwords etc. Can someone tell me how to set up XP to automatically
> remember passwords and fill in forms etc so I can remove this vile Program
> {gator} and still keep the wife happy? Many thanks
>
>
> JCW

Internet Option> Content. AutoComplete settings. Enable the remembering of
passwords per site.

Haven't tried it yet but have seen many recommendations for a program named
"Roboform" that is adware free. That might be a suitable replacement for
Gator if your wife doesn't like how IE handles the storing of passwords.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

JCW wrote:
> My wife installed and uses Gator because the auto filling and
> remembering passwords etc. Can someone tell me how to set up XP to
> automatically remember passwords and fill in forms etc so I can
> remove this vile Program {gator} and still keep the wife happy? Many
> thanks
>
> JCW


Look, you moronic cretin, this is the *THIRD* time you've posted this (I
know because I've replied to the other two). Your email address isn't valid,
therefore you cannot be wanting emailed replies (not that you'd get them).
Why are you posting ad infinitum et ad nauseam and not checking your
original for replies?! You can watch threads on OE, why aren't you doing
so?!

This is your last warning - next time it's the bozo bin.

--
Facon - the artificial bacon bits you get in Pizza Hut for sprinkling
on salads.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Bruce Chambers wrote:
> JCW wrote:
>> My wife installed and uses Gator because the auto filling and
>> remembering passwords etc. Can someone tell me how to set up XP to
>> automatically remember passwords and fill in forms etc so I can
>> remove this vile Program {gator} and still keep the wife happy? Many
>> thanks JCW
>>
>>
>
> I commend you for wanting to rid your computer of Gator, but think
> that you need to rethink the idea of replacing it with something
> else. From a security point of view, using any software product to
> remember passwords is a very risky thing to do. The right piece of
> malware can than easily make your passwords available to just about
> whomever wants them. Think of it like locking your house whenever
> you go out, but leaving the key in the lock: an exercise in futility
> and an open invitation to all comers. If your wife cannot or will
> not learn to remember a few passwords, you might want to think about
> introducing her to the combination of pen and paper. At least that
> way, someone would first have to get physical access to the computer
> to exploit them.
> To deal with issues caused by any sort of "adware" and/or
> "spyware,"such as Gator, Comet Cursors, Smiley Central, Xupiter,
> Bonzai Buddy, or KaZaA, and their remnants, that you've deliberately
> (but without understanding the consequences) installed, two products
> that are quite effective (at finding and removing this type of
> scumware) are Ad-Aware from www.lavasoft.de and SpyBot Search &
> Destroy from www.safer-networking.org/. Both have free versions.
> It's even possible to use SpyBot Search & Destroy to "immunize" your
> system against most future intrusions. I use both and generally
> perform manual scans every week or so to clean out cookies, etc.
>
> Additionally, manual removal instructions for the most common
> varieties of scumware are available here:
>
> PC Hell Spyware and Adware Removal Help
> http://www.pchell.com/support/spyware.shtml
>
>
> Neither adware nor spyware, collectively known as scumware,
> magically install themselves on anyone's computer. They are almost
> always deliberately installed by the computer's user, as part of some
> allegedly "free" service or product.
>
> While there are some unscrupulous malware distributors out there,
> who do attempt to install and exploit malware without consent, the
> majority of them simply rely upon the intellectual laziness and
> gullibility of the average consumer, counting on them to quickly click
> past the EULA in his/her haste to get the latest in "free" cutesy
> cursors, screensavers, "utilities," and/or wallpapers.
>
> If you were to read the EULAs that accompany, and to which the
> computer user must agree before the download/installation of the
> "screensaver" continues, most adware and spyware, you'll find that
> they _do_ have the consumer's permission to do exactly what they're
> doing. In the overwhelming majority of cases, computer users have no
> one to blame but themselves.
>
> There are several essential components to computer security: a
> knowledgeable and pro-active user, a properly configured firewall,
> reliable and up-to-date antivirus software, and the prompt repair (via
> patches, hotfixes, or service packs) of any known vulnerabilities.
>
> The weakest link in this "equation" is, of course, the computer
> user. No software manufacturer can -- nor should they be expected
> to -- protect the computer user from him/herself. All too many people
> have bought into the various PC/software manufacturers marketing
> claims of easy computing. They believe that their computer should be
> no harder to use than a toaster oven; they have neither the
> inclination or desire to learn how to safely use their computer. All
> too few people keep their antivirus software current, install patches
> in a timely manner, or stop to really think about that cutesy link
> they're about to click.
>
> Firewalls and anti-virus applications, which should always be used
> and should always be running, are important components of "safe hex,"
> but they cannot, and should not be expected to, protect the computer
> user from him/herself. Ultimately, it is incumbent upon each and
> every computer user to learn how to secure his/her own computer.
>
>
> To learn more about practicing "safe hex," start with these links:
>
> Protect Your PC
> http://www.microsoft.com/security/protect/default.asp
>
> Home Computer Security
> http://www.cert.org/homeusers/HomeComputerSecurity/
>
> List of Antivirus Software Vendors
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;49500
>
> Home PC Firewall Guide
> http://www.firewallguide.com/
>
> Scumware.com
> http://www.scumware.com/


Bruce you're wasting your time. This is the third time he's posted this (the
other two were in general I believe) he's obviously not interested in
checking back for replies (I'd be more lenient if it weren't for the fact
he's using OE).
--
Facon - the artificial bacon bits you get in Pizza Hut for sprinkling
on salads.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Thanks Bruce and Sharon,

I am grateful for you response and advice. I will heed your advice and pass
it on.
As far as Miss Persnipity Tacky or whatever. I do check for replies and I do
acknowledge advice given and the reason I posted in Basics is because I
didn't see my posts or a reply in the General group. I'm sorry if I have
wasted your most precious time and I'm not sure Mr. Chambers would
appreciate you dictating what he should do with his time. He and others have
helped me out numerous times as I am the first to admit my lack of knowledge
in some areas. But as for your comment I am sorry I wasted your most
precious time.

JCW
"Sharon F" <sharonfDEL@ETEmvps.org> wrote in message
news:OpnzNbL4EHA.3840@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 09:17:11 -0800, JCW wrote:
>
>> My wife installed and uses Gator because the auto filling and remembering
>> passwords etc. Can someone tell me how to set up XP to automatically
>> remember passwords and fill in forms etc so I can remove this vile
>> Program
>> {gator} and still keep the wife happy? Many thanks
>>
>>
>> JCW
>
> Internet Option> Content. AutoComplete settings. Enable the remembering of
> passwords per site.
>
> Haven't tried it yet but have seen many recommendations for a program
> named
> "Roboform" that is adware free. That might be a suitable replacement for
> Gator if your wife doesn't like how IE handles the storing of passwords.
>
> --
> Sharon F
> MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
 

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