Question If I get more memory, will games run faster?

Mar 2, 2019
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I want to get more ram. Now I have 4 gb ddr3 1600mhz ram. I want another 4 gb
My computer
I3-3240
Gt 640 1gb

If I double my ram can I get better fps in games Like rust, rainbow six siege?
 

COLGeek

Titan
Moderator
Assuming you have a 64-bit version of Windows installed, then yes, your system should perform better overall with more memory. For best performance, you need to install 100% matching memory.

However, both your CPU and GPU are on the lower end of the performance spectrum, adding more memory will not make them faster, but possibly more effective overall.

Is your primary storage device a SSD or a HDD?
 
Mar 2, 2019
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Thanks for the respond.
Im using 64 bit version windows. I know that i need the same type of ram.
I only have HDD in the moment, but i thinking to get an SSD
 

compprob237

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I want to get more ram. Now I have 4 gb ddr3 1600mhz ram. I want another 4 gb
My computer
i3-3240
GT 640 1GB


If I double my ram can I get better fps in games Like rust, rainbow six siege?
No, your GPU is probably the biggest cause for low framerates. There's built-in Intel GPUs that have more performance than that GPU. Although, 4GB of RAM is not exactly enough RAM either. Looking at your overall package makes me think "everything needs to be upgraded..."

A simple test you can try is to use Intel XTU and try a slight overclock and slight underclock of the CPU to see what effect it has on your performance. If you have significant changes going either way then your CPU is the problem. If there's very little either way then it's either the RAM or GPU that is the issue.

I'll outline the two games and point out the issues compared to your system.
Minimum requirements for Rust (I know these aren't perfect but they illustrate a point):
CPU: Intel Core i7-3770 / AMD FX-9590 or better
RAM: 8 GB
VIDEO CARD: GTX 670 2GB / AMD R9 280 better
DEDICATED VIDEO RAM: 2048 MB
Notes: Your CPU has too few cores, you do not have enough RAM, your GPU has too little performance, and your GPU has too little VRAM.

Minimum requirements for Rainbow 6 Siege:
CPU: Intel Core i3 560 @ 3.3GHz or better, AMD Phenom II X4 945 @ 3.0Ghz or better
RAM: 6 GB
VIDEO CARD: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460, AMD Radeon HD 5770, And DX11 cards with 1GB VRAM
DEDICATED VIDEO RAM: 1 GB
Notes: You do not have enough RAM and your GPU has too little performance.

After looking at the two minimum GPUs your current GPU is half the performance of Rainbow 6 Siege's and a quarter the performance of Rust's.


Here's a few examples of upgrades you can do. Keep in mind that I'm not suggesting these specific parts but more that these would be something you could consider.
"New" CPU with 4 CPU cores: ~$34 on the second-hand market.
Example: $34 (Incl. shipping) - Core i5-3340S from Ebay
Note: Does not meet minimum requirement for Rust but is significantly better. I'd also need to know what your specific make and model motherboard you have or the make and model for the pre-built computer (HP/Compaq/Gateway).


New RAM: ~$26 for the bargain bin sticks.
Example: $26 - G.Skill Ripjaws DDR3-1600 9-9-9-24-2N 1.5v
Note: As with the CPU I'd like to know what make and model motherboard or pre-built system you have before committing to any suggestions.

New GPU: ~$130 for the minimum I'd suggest that stays within the minimum requirements of those two games.
Examples: $130 - AMD RX 570 (Note: requires a decent PSU) | $170 - Nvidia GTX 1050 Ti (Note: Does not need a powerful PSU but is a HUGE rip-off)
Note: This one highly pivots on what the output and quality of PSU you have. I'd need the make and model of the PSU or the make and model of the pre-built computer. Also, if you're willing to risk the second hand market you can find great deals on used GPUs like a GTX 960 (~$66).
 
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Mar 2, 2019
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No, your GPU is probably the biggest cause for low framerates. There's built-in Intel GPUs that have more performance than that GPU. Although, 4GB of RAM is not exactly enough RAM either. Looking at your overall package makes me think "everything needs to be upgraded..."

A simple test you can try is to use Intel XTU and try a slight overclock and slight underclock of the CPU to see what effect it has on your performance. If you have significant changes going either way then your CPU is the problem. If there's very little either way then it's either the RAM or GPU that is the issue.

I'll outline the two games and point out the issues compared to your system.
Minimum requirements for Rust (I know these aren't perfect but they illustrate a point):
CPU: Intel Core i7-3770 / AMD FX-9590 or better
RAM: 8 GB
VIDEO CARD: GTX 670 2GB / AMD R9 280 better
DEDICATED VIDEO RAM: 2048 MB
Notes: Your CPU has too few cores, you do not have enough RAM, your GPU has too little performance, and your GPU has too little VRAM.

Minimum requirements for Rainbow 6 Siege:
CPU: Intel Core i3 560 @ 3.3GHz or better, AMD Phenom II X4 945 @ 3.0Ghz or better
RAM: 6 GB
VIDEO CARD: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460, AMD Radeon HD 5770, And DX11 cards with 1GB VRAM
DEDICATED VIDEO RAM: 1 GB
Notes: You do not have enough RAM and your GPU has too little performance.

After looking at the two minimum GPUs your current GPU is half the performance of Rainbow 6 Siege's and a quarter the performance of Rust's.


Here's a few examples of upgrades you can do. Keep in mind that I'm not suggesting these specific parts but more that these would be something you could consider.
"New" CPU with 4 CPU cores: ~$34 on the second-hand market.
Example: $34 (Incl. shipping) - Core i5-3340S from Ebay
Note: Does not meet minimum requirement for Rust but is significantly better. I'd also need to know what your specific make and model motherboard you have or the make and model for the pre-built computer (HP/Compaq/Gateway).


New RAM: ~$26 for the bargain bin sticks.
Example: $26 - G.Skill Ripjaws DDR3-1600 9-9-9-24-2N 1.5v
Note: As with the CPU I'd like to know what make and model motherboard or pre-built system you have before committing to any suggestions.

New GPU: ~$130 for the minimum I'd suggest that stays within the minimum requirements of those two games.
Examples: $130 - AMD RX 570 (Note: requires a decent PSU) | $170 - Nvidia GTX 1050 Ti (Note: Does not need a powerful PSU but is a HUGE rip-off)
Note: This one highly pivots on what the output and quality of PSU you have. I'd need the make and model of the PSU or the make and model of the pre-built computer. Also, if you're willing to risk the second hand market you can find great deals on used GPUs like a GTX 960 (~$66).
I have an ASUS B75M-PLUS motherboard
 
Mar 2, 2019
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That stick of RAM and CPU should work just fine in that motherboard.

What kind of power supply do you have?
Did you try doing the overclock/underclock I mentioned using Intel XTU?
I have a 450W power supply.
And I dont think I can overclock/underclock the CPU because I can only change the voltage.. Or I do something wrong :D
 
Adding extra memory to your existing memory have no guarantee to be compatible together.

Exact match, identical, same thing have no guarantee to be compatible together.

Memory is guaranteed in the form sold. I suggest you buy a kit of two.
 

Rogue Leader

Titan
Moderator
Will it perform better? Yes.

How much? Not much, your handicap on that system is a CPU just above the minimum, and a GPU well below the minimum for the games you are playing.

There are better ways to spend your money... like saving it for a bigger upgrade than 4gb of ram.
 
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Adding extra memory to your existing memory have no guarantee to be compatible together.

Exact match, identical, same thing have no guarantee to be compatible together.

Memory is guaranteed in the form sold. I suggest you buy a kit of two.
Why? I don't get it :S If I get the same RAM stick are they didn't work?
 
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Will it perform better? Yes.

How much? Not much, your handicap on that system is a CPU just above the minimum, and a GPU well below the minimum for the games you are playing.

There are better ways to spend your money... like saving it for a bigger upgrade than 4gb of ram.
I'm searching now a GPU, I don't want to spend too much money, I'm trying to get the best deals.
 
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Rogue Leader

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I have about 125 USD budget, I'm whatcing the local second hand market
Yeah with a limited budget like that thats all you can do. Try and get your hands on a used GTX 970 and an 8gb ram kit, or a single 8gb dimm. Getting a matching DIMM to the one you have has no guarantee of working.

That said, if you can save up more I'd consider a whole system upgrade, but thats up to you and how long it would take for you to get the money together.
 

compprob237

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Why? I don't get it :S If I get the same RAM stick are they didn't work?
https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/articles/000005657/boards-and-kits.html#dual
"Rules to enable dual-channel mode
To achieve dual-channel mode, the following conditions must be met:
  • Same memory size. Examples: 1 GB, 2 GB, 4 GB.
  • Matched DIMM configuration in each channel.
  • Matched in symmetrical memory slots.
...
The following conditions do not need to be met:
  • Same brand
  • Same timing specifications
  • Same speed (MHz)
The slowest DIMM module populated in the system decides memory channel speed."
 
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Rogue Leader

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Calvin doesn't know what they're talking about.
https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/articles/000005657/boards-and-kits.html#dual
"Rules to enable dual-channel mode
To achieve dual-channel mode, the following conditions must be met:
  • Same memory size. Examples: 1 GB, 2 GB, 4 GB.
  • Matched DIMM configuration in each channel.
  • Matched in symmetrical memory slots.
...
The following conditions do not need to be met:
  • Same brand
  • Same timing specifications
  • Same speed (MHz)
The slowest DIMM module populated in the system decides memory channel speed."
Actually, he does know what he is taking about. And what did I say about personal attacks?

Ram can be VERY finicky, and in many situations not using a matched set results in a system that either is not stable or doesn't boot at all. Thats what he was referring to. If you want your best chance of it working and not being stuck with ram that you can't use you need to either buy a matched set, or at a minimum buy the identical DIMM to what you have. For example if you try to run a Samsung and a Hynix DIMM in the same system in most cases it won't work at all.
 
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I want the same RAM stick. You say don't risk it?
and I've got a pretty good deal ASUS GTX 750Ti Formula OC for ~65 USD
the only question is, my PSU can handle it?
 

Rogue Leader

Titan
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I've got another question. I bought Gigabyte windforce 960 2gb and that is need 2x6 pin connectors. My PSU only have 1x6 pin connectors. If I buy a 1x6pin to 2x6 pin adapter (idk what is the name) that's can work? Or I need another type?
If your PSU doesn't have the proper connectors, buy a new PSU. DO NOT use such adapters, they are dangerous garbage.
 
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compprob237

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Ram can be VERY finicky, and in many situations not using a matched set results in a system that either is not stable or doesn't boot at all. Thats what he was referring to. If you want your best chance of it working and not being stuck with ram that you can't use you need to either buy a matched set, or at a minimum buy the identical DIMM to what you have. For example if you try to run a Samsung and a Hynix DIMM in the same system in most cases it won't work at all.
I have multiple anecdotal examples, as well as links specifically to Intel's and AMD's statements, that oppose this predication. Even my signature system "Gramps" is an example that opposes this notion. Yes, motherboard/chipset and CPU IMC's can be finicky at times but it is not the fault, necessarily, of the RAM. In fact, I know that it is the CPU IMC that asserts compatibility since the Core i7-900s were released. The Core i7-900s/Xeon X54xx/X56xx never state that they support addressing any RAM stick with a capacity above 4GB (All consumer boards claim 4GB/slot) but yet Gramps here does work just fine with 8GB sticks. The requirement for it to work, after cross-referencing the technical documents for the IMC of the Xeon's (which is the same IMC in the i7-900s), is that the composition cannot exceed 512Mb/chip. Thus, dual rank (total of 16) 512Mb composition sticks will work in the system. This was not a function of the RAM being "finicky" but it is, in fact, the Integrated Memory Controller inside the CPU that dictates this. Well, unless the Memory Controller resides in the Chipset, like it does in older systems, in which case this puts the onus on the motherboard/chipset (Remember VIA?). Lastly, there is a RAM slot topology and trace design that can effect overclocking. 1DPC, Daisy chain and T-topology can effect overclocking. 1DPC is the best for overclocking with daisy chain being 2nd best but only when using 2 DIMMs. Using 4 DIMMs then you want T-Topology for the best overclockability. Go figure, most RAM manufacturers use 1DPC or daisy chain motherboards, with cherry picked CPU IMCs, for their DDR4-3866+ kits.

Gramps, besides needing more VDIMM (Motherboard+RAM OC), has Elpida 128Mbx8 (dual rank -> 2x8=16 total), Micron (SpecTek) 512Mbx8 (dual rank -> 2x8=16 total), and Powerchip (PSC) 256Mbx8 (single rank -> 1x8=8 total) all playing nicely together, after tweaks, and the Elpida is overclocked from DDR3-1333 to DDR3-1680 with tighter timings. Elpida is widely known to be a pretty low quality memory chip manufacturer and is one of the reasons they went out of business. The Elpida RAM is most likely the reason that I must run the RAM at 1.58v. That voltage is completely within Intel's spec for the platform and in fact leaves me with 0.17v of room to possibly overclock further while still staying within spec (1.65v max).
I've got Crucial and Samsung to play nicely together (Micron + Elpida) in an old Dell that had a severly locked down BIOS (XPS 600) that was so bad it required reprogramming the EEPROM of the Elpida. It was overclocking the PCI-E bus causing instability and other hilarity (onboard sound ran at 1.25x speed). This is, yet again, not the fault of the RAM but more the BIOS/chipset of the motherboard.
Hynix + Samsung in a Samsung+AMD laptop
Hynix + Micron(/Crucial) in an HP Desktop that I made sure composition and rank were the same (BIOS was finicky).
Hynix + Infineon in a Sandy Bridge board.
Hynix + Infineon in a P4 DDR1 board and I'm kind of guessing the second stick. I know it was a Corsair XMS (Infineon) and another with no heat spreader (Patriot/Hynix?).
OCZ(Way before Toshiba acquisition) + Micron + Infineon(Way before they merged with Micron) on an old DDR2 platform (Intel D975XBX2 + C2Q Q6600)
Samsung + Winbond with an LGA775 P4-3.4GHz Extreme Edition.
NEC + Micron (SDRAM back during the P3 days)
And these are the ones I remember off the top of my head or literally pulled down from the attic since I had so much time to create this post.

Even Intel themselves state:
https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/articles/000005657/boards-and-kits.html#dual
"Rules to enable dual-channel mode:
...
The following conditions do not need to be met:
Same brand
Same timing specifications
Same speed (MHz)"
Granted, this multi-channel specification (including Flex mode) wasn't completely ratified until the DDR2 specification. This was referred to as Symmetrical ("Dual") and Asymmetrical ("Single") or Ganged("Dual") and Unganged("Single").
AMD recently implemented this functionality proper with the Ryzen series. Older AMD CPUs actually had a setting in the motherboard to control the gang mode.

So, this assumption that you must purchase a multi-channel kit, or the exact same stick, is an unfounded one based on myths. While multi-channel kits do offer better performance (because of multi-channel) and compatibility it is not necessary to purchase a multi-channel kit for compatibility. The only time that there can be an issue is when you're using low density memory which can only result in the IMC having a harder time accessing the modules (usually requiring more voltage with either the RAM and/or IMC). AMD actually outlines this in their technical documents on the Ryzen chips: https://community.amd.com/community/gaming/blog/2017/03/14/tips-for-building-a-better-amd-ryzen-system Looking at the chart in the link it appears that four sticks of dual-rank memory, which results in DDR4-1866, will be the hardest to overclock due to the IMC. This is not because the "Ram can be VERY finicky" but because the IMC itself is finicky.

I'll believe my personal experience as well as the statements made by CPU manufacturers who create the Integrated Memory Controllers that speak to these memory modules. I've been mixing RAM for over a decade. While it is good practice to purchase the same composition (dual vs single rank), manufacturer of internals for RAM modules, and same manufacturing die it does not necessarily mean that you must purchase a multi-channel kit, specifically, to ensure they work together. In fact, most manufacturers only warrant that their kits were tested to work together. Not that they will work together on everything. This is why QVL's exist in the first place as they're tested by the manufacturer to ensure that the kit does work on the system (even if cherry picked by RAM manufacturers for DDR4-3866+ kits).

By the way, I do have access to a GTX 1080 Ti (EVGA 11G-P4-6593-KR). I was going to run those tests using that GPU soon but those videos were all I had on hand at the time. Shall I perform the tests with said GTX 1080 Ti at 720p or 800x600? Is the fact that the game is Star Citizen disqualify it from any and all validation even if I can prove performance scaling based on CPU single thread performance (which you would have seen if you actually looked at my previously linked thread/article on SC forums)? Shall I test Ashes of the Benchmark-Ahem- Singularity (A game I'd have to buy, but would if necessary) to show CPU performance or something more mainstream that is more representative of subjective reality? Shall I perform tests of multiple different mainstream games to give a proper sample? Do you have a certain method I should follow that will fulfill the requirements you have to allow my performance tests to be admissible? I must preface this with my pre-requisite that I do not purchase any EA, Ubisoft, or Activision games because I refuse to hand those disgusting companies any more of my money. I definitely would consider borrowing the games if I knew anyone that owned them. Many of my friends do not own the games you've mentioned previously, Assassin's Creed Odyssey and Battlefield 5, so I'd be forced to find someone willing to let me borrow their game library account(s).

Actually, he does know what he is taking about.
Ya, OK. Sure.
 
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compprob237

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I want the same RAM stick. You say don't risk it?
You can purchase the same model stick and be fairly confident that it will work. Unlike the misinformation I've seen being pushed. Also, most RAM manufacturers offer lifetime warranties. So, if you get a dead-on-arrival (DOA) stick then you can go through the retailer or the manufacturer to get a working one. I suggest G.Skill because they're very accommodating with warranty RMAs.

and I've got a pretty good deal ASUS GTX 750Ti Formula OC for ~65 USD
the only question is, my PSU can handle it?
The 750 Ti uses a max of 150w so it should be completely fine with most any system. Nvidia's specification actually states a max of 60w but that one probably uses more. You GT 640 actually uses more power than the 750 Ti. That 750 Ti represents a roughly 3x increase in performance. My previously mentioned RX 570 would be too much load for your PSU. The GTX 1050 Ti, which I find to be a rip-off, would be your next best choice but perhaps consider waiting for Nvidia to release their GTX 1650. Hopefully it is entirely powered by the slot (no PCIe power, 75w) or uses a 6-pin connector (75w connector + 75w from slot, 150w total).
 
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Rogue Leader

Titan
Moderator
I have multiple anecdotal examples, as well as links specifically to Intel's and AMD's statements, that oppose this predication.
I'm not going to sit here and line by line your thread. Aside from your condescending tone trying to "educate me" your anecdotal evidence doesn't trump anyone elses. In many many years working with this I know my statements to be correct. So instead I'm going to tell you you have the best possible resource right here, an account on this forum. Spend any time in the memory or systems areas of this forum and you will see how wrong you are.
 
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