Question Is it possible

May 20, 2019
42
0
30
0
Hey i have 4 fans on my case (air flow) and i decided to buy LL120 Fans (static Pressure) is it good to exchange air flow to static pressure ?
 

NightAntilli

Honorable
Jun 12, 2014
2,123
23
12,665
245
I don't know exactly what you mean... But, a higher static pressure is to allow the fan to overcome the resistances of a heat sink, wire mess, dust filter etc. As long as the static pressure of the fan is higher than the resistance, you will have air flow, and the higher the difference, the higher the flow.
 
May 20, 2019
42
0
30
0
I don't know exactly what you mean... But, a higher static pressure is to allow the fan to overcome the resistances of a heat sink, wire mess, dust filter etc. As long as the static pressure of the fan is higher than the resistance, you will have air flow, and the higher the difference, the higher the flow.
I have air flow fans can i exchange them by static pressure fans ?
 

Math Geek

Glorious
Herald
it's not recommended to use SF fans as case fans. they are more for heatsinks, radiators and other uses where the air has to "squeeze" into places.

stick with what you have for case fans, it'll make for better flow inside the case.
 
May 20, 2019
42
0
30
0
it's not recommended to use SF fans as case fans. they are more for heatsinks, radiators and other uses where the air has to "squeeze" into places.

stick with what you have for case fans, it'll make for better flow inside the case.
I dislike my fans so i decided to buy LL Fans and exchange them
 

Math Geek

Glorious
Herald
not a biggie. i usually replace stock fans myself right away. but stick with high air flow versions for the case. the idea is to keep the air flowing from front to back and a static fan won't move enough air far enough to be much help.

imagine a big shop fan that only blew air about 1 ft in front of it vs one that you can feel 30 ft away. that's the difference between static pressure and air flow fans!! the case wants that air moving as far as possible while the heatsink only wants it moving very close by
 
May 20, 2019
42
0
30
0
not a biggie. i usually replace stock fans myself right away. but stick with high air flow versions for the case. the idea is to keep the air flowing from front to back and a static fan won't move enough air far enough to be much help.

imagine a big shop fan that only blew air about 1 ft in front of it vs one that you can feel 30 ft away. that's the difference between static pressure and air flow fans!! the case wants that air moving as far as possible while the heatsink only wants it moving very close by
i want a good air flow fans with beautiful rgb to place it at front
 
The difference between Air Flow and Static Pressure fan designs is in how much air FLOW the fan can deliver at different backpressures (resistance to air flow). In GENERAL, an Air Flow design will deliver more air flow (and hence more cooling capacity) when faced with a LOW backpressure such as most case vent fans "see". But for specific fan models, look at their specs. Most fans show specs for Air Flow and Static Pressure. In your case, look mainly at the Air Flow ratings, and see whether the fans you are considering can deliver flow as well as others that are specifically designed for good air flow at low backpressure. If your fans have good air flow, then whether they are called Static Pressure or Air Flow designs does NOT matter.

FYI, here's how I understand those fan specs. The Air Flow rating is the maximum air flow one fan can deliver against virtually NO backpressure. But flow decreases as backpressure is increased, and at some point the backpressure (air flow resistance downstream from the fan) gets so hogh that actual air flow becomes effectively zero. So if you sketch out a rough graph of air flow versus backpressure you get a very approximately straight line between the limiting conditions: max airflow at zero backpressure, and zero airflow at the max static pressure rating. You can do this on the same graph for specs from several fans, and see which gives you the most airflow for the backpressure you expect to experience in your application.

Note that the LL120 fans have RGB lighting units built into the fan frames, and require some power and control connections for those parts separately from the fan motor connections. Corsair uses some fan RGB connectors that are different from those used by many others. But if you buy a 3-pack of LL120 fans that INCLUDES two boxes (an RGB Hub and a Lighting Node Pro control box) plus a couple of cables, you can connect those up and use Corsair's free iCue software utility to control the lighting displays.
 
May 20, 2019
42
0
30
0
The difference between Air Flow and Static Pressure fan designs is in how much air FLOW the fan can deliver at different backpressures (resistance to air flow). In GENERAL, an Air Flow design will deliver more air flow (and hence more cooling capacity) when faced with a LOW backpressure such as most case vent fans "see". But for specific fan models, look at their specs. Most fans show specs for Air Flow and Static Pressure. In your case, look mainly at the Air Flow ratings, and see whether the fans you are considering can deliver flow as well as others that are specifically designed for good air flow at low backpressure. If your fans have good air flow, then whether they are called Static Pressure or Air Flow designs does NOT matter.

FYI, here's how I understand those fan specs. The Air Flow rating is the maximum air flow one fan can deliver against virtually NO backpressure. But flow decreases as backpressure is increased, and at some point the backpressure (air flow resistance downstream from the fan) gets so hogh that actual air flow becomes effectively zero. So if you sketch out a rough graph of air flow versus backpressure you get a very approximately straight line between the limiting conditions: max airflow at zero backpressure, and zero airflow at the max static pressure rating. You can do this on the same graph for specs from several fans, and see which gives you the most airflow for the backpressure you expect to experience in your application.

Note that the LL120 fans have RGB lighting units built into the fan frames, and require some power and control connections for those parts separately from the fan motor connections. Corsair uses some fan RGB connectors that are different from those used by many others. But if you buy a 3-pack of LL120 fans that INCLUDES two boxes (an RGB Hub and a Lighting Node Pro control box) plus a couple of cables, you can connect those up and use Corsair's free iCue software utility to control the lighting displays.
Yes i will buy 4 fans.(3 pack and single pack)
anyway i will place 3 at front and one at rear. But I don’t know if i will able to get good airflow ? (it has 43.25 CFM. 600-1500 RPM)
 

Math Geek

Glorious
Herald
3 intake and 1 exhaust can create a new set of problems. you are better off using 2 and 2 to prevent issues with stagnant air inside the case. i know it seems like a good idea but too much air in and not enough out can cause pockets of high pressure inside the case where the air actually does not move at all.

it's true that air will find a way to leave even without a fan, but you can still cause air pockets to stay still completely killing your airflow plan. front/side and low is best for intake fans and top and high placements are good for exhaust fans if possible.
 
Actually, the two of each size works well. Corsair sells the 140 mm fan size as a TWO-pack including their RGB Hub and Lighting Node Pro. Then two single 120 mm fans added does the whole job. The questions to be answered are whether or not the case can allow a pair of 140mm fans in the front, and where to place two 120mm exhaust fans. OP, tell us the maker and exact model number of the CASE you have so we can advise on that.

FYI, the reason for this two-size idea is that it is best to have slightly more intake air flow than exhaust, so that there is a small positive pressure inside the case that causes minor air leaks to flow OUT through case cracks, thus preventing unfiltered air intake that carries dust in. Plus, the INTAKE fans should have dust filters on them that provide a SMALL air flow resistance so that the intake fans actually deliver less that their max air flow. The 140 mm LL120's are spec'd at 51 CFM max, whereas the 120 mm models are 43 CFM, so that's a good balance.
 
May 20, 2019
42
0
30
0
Actually, the two of each size works well. Corsair sells the 140 mm fan size as a TWO-pack including their RGB Hub and Lighting Node Pro. Then two single 120 mm fans added does the whole job. The questions to be answered are whether or not the case can allow a pair of 140mm fans in the front, and where to place two 120mm exhaust fans. OP, tell us the maker and exact model number of the CASE you have so we can advise on that.

FYI, the reason for this two-size idea is that it is best to have slightly more intake air flow than exhaust, so that there is a small positive pressure inside the case that causes minor air leaks to flow OUT through case cracks, thus preventing unfiltered air intake that carries dust in. Plus, the INTAKE fans should have dust filters on them that provide a SMALL air flow resistance so that the intake fans actually deliver less that their max air flow. The 140 mm LL120's are spec'd at 51 CFM max, whereas the 120 mm models are 43 CFM, so that's a good balance.
CM MasterBox Lite 5 RGB
 
May 20, 2019
42
0
30
0
Actually, the two of each size works well. Corsair sells the 140 mm fan size as a TWO-pack including their RGB Hub and Lighting Node Pro. Then two single 120 mm fans added does the whole job. The questions to be answered are whether or not the case can allow a pair of 140mm fans in the front, and where to place two 120mm exhaust fans. OP, tell us the maker and exact model number of the CASE you have so we can advise on that.

FYI, the reason for this two-size idea is that it is best to have slightly more intake air flow than exhaust, so that there is a small positive pressure inside the case that causes minor air leaks to flow OUT through case cracks, thus preventing unfiltered air intake that carries dust in. Plus, the INTAKE fans should have dust filters on them that provide a SMALL air flow resistance so that the intake fans actually deliver less that their max air flow. The 140 mm LL120's are spec'd at 51 CFM max, whereas the 120 mm models are 43 CFM, so that's a good balance.
I can’t place any fans at top or bottom just front and rear
 
May 20, 2019
42
0
30
0
Actually, the two of each size works well. Corsair sells the 140 mm fan size as a TWO-pack including their RGB Hub and Lighting Node Pro. Then two single 120 mm fans added does the whole job. The questions to be answered are whether or not the case can allow a pair of 140mm fans in the front, and where to place two 120mm exhaust fans. OP, tell us the maker and exact model number of the CASE you have so we can advise on that.

FYI, the reason for this two-size idea is that it is best to have slightly more intake air flow than exhaust, so that there is a small positive pressure inside the case that causes minor air leaks to flow OUT through case cracks, thus preventing unfiltered air intake that carries dust in. Plus, the INTAKE fans should have dust filters on them that provide a SMALL air flow resistance so that the intake fans actually deliver less that their max air flow. The 140 mm LL120's are spec'd at 51 CFM max, whereas the 120 mm models are 43 CFM, so that's a good balance.
I got an idea

Front: 2x140m (intake)
Rear: 1x120m (exhaust)

What do you think. ?
 
Yes, that's ideal. As I said, questions to be answered are:

1. Can you mount those fans that way? Is there space for 2 140 mm fans at the front.

2. You indicated, I thought, there is only one space at the rear for a 120 mm fan. Where do you mount the second exhaust fan?
 
May 20, 2019
42
0
30
0
Yes, that's ideal. As I said, questions to be answered are:

1. Can you mount those fans that way? Is there space for 2 140 mm fans at the front.

2. You indicated, I thought, there is only one space at the rear for a 120 mm fan. Where do you mount the second exhaust fan?
Yes i can place two 140m fans at front or three 120m fans

And rear i can place one 120m only

Its just one exhaust fan not two
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY