Question New PC - No display - No bios - Restarting constantly

MrPsychoticRage

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So I’ve recently built a new computer with all new out of the box components and when I try to turn it on I get no bios, no display and it restarts every 1 minute or so, about 8 times or so and then it stops restarting altogether. All the fans work, the GPU lights up but I don’t have a mobo speaker to get a beep code, I’ll be getting one soon so I can test that though.
So far I’ve tried:
  • removing GPU and using onboard graphics
  • Using only one ram stick and changing slots each time
  • disconnecting everything except water cooler fans, cpu power, main mobo power, stick of ram and power switch plug
  • resting the mobo on cardboard
  • removing CMOS battery, waiting 15, plugging back in and turning on
  • holding power button for a minute with the power unplugged, then plugging it back in
All of it produces the same result. Now while assembling the mobo, I was using liquid metal for thermal paste, the conductonaut stuff, and spilt a little in one of the ram slots and a tiny tiny dot of it in between the slot and the next one. I haven’t been using that slot for obvious reasons, and I used an alcohol swab to clean the tiny amount in between as best I could as it’s tight to get in there.
Aside from this I cannot think of any errors I may have made and am kind of stumped as to what to do next. I don’t have fresh parts to switch out and try deducting what the culprit is aside from another PSU I could try but I highly doubt is the issue given it’s brand spanking new. Please any help is appreciated, I’ll post the parts below too. Cheers.

(Components + SSD & HDD from old PC is all i have)
https://www.pccasegear.com/sc/x7b
 

Darkbreeze

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You don't HAVE any onboard graphics, because you have a KF processor and that lacks integrated graphics. So that means nothing.

Are you connecting the display cable to the graphics card, or to the motherboard? Assuming you ARE connecting the display cable to the graphics card, try a DIFFERENT display output or a DIFFERENT TYPE of display output.

What are you using now? DP? HDMI? DVI? What is the model of your monitor? Do you have ANY other display cables you can use whether of the same type or a different type?

Also, please post your full hardware specifications HERE, in your thread, so we don't have to spend time visiting other pages to reference the hardware in question. It makes it easier on everybody, including you, especially if it turns out to be a thread that is several pages long.
 

MrPsychoticRage

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The monitor works as I was using it just yesterday, it is through HDMI. I will try a different monitor soon. So I just got a speaker, and I’m getting 3 beeps meaning memory error.
How should I proceed?

My specs are as follows:
Intel Core i7 9700KF
Asrock Z390 Pro4 Motherboard
Corsair Vengeance 2x8GB 3600MHz DDR4
Corsair TX850 850w PSU
RTX 2070

Appreciate your reply man.
 

Darkbreeze

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Ok, so which slots do you have the memory installed in, starting from the CPU and going TOWARDS the edge of the motherboard, with the slot closest to the CPU being DIMM slot 1 and the one closest to the edge of the motherboard being DIMM slot 4? Which slots?

Also, it's probably a good idea to remove the memory and check for any debris or bits of anything IN the DIMM slot, and then reseat the memory making sure to align the key and keyway in the bottom of the memory and inside of the DIMM slot so the memory can fully seat AND that you seat the memory fully so that the notches engage the tangs in the locks at both ends of the DIMM slots. They should "click" into place when installed correctly but it is important that both ends are fully seated and that can't happen if the keyway is not aligned OR if you don't first slip one end in under the tang on models where there is only a lever lock at one end and one end is stationary.
 

MrPsychoticRage

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Ok, so which slots do you have the memory installed in, starting from the CPU and going TOWARDS the edge of the motherboard, with the slot closest to the CPU being DIMM slot 1 and the one closest to the edge of the motherboard being DIMM slot 4? Which slots?

Also, it's probably a good idea to remove the memory and check for any debris or bits of anything IN the DIMM slot, and then reseat the memory making sure to align the key and keyway in the bottom of the memory and inside of the DIMM slot so the memory can fully seat AND that you seat the memory fully so that the notches engage the tangs in the locks at both ends of the DIMM slots. They should "click" into place when installed correctly but it is important that both ends are fully seated and that can't happen if the keyway is not aligned OR if you don't first slip one end in under the tang on models where there is only a lever lock at one end and one end is stationary.
I have tried it in every slot, and yes I know about clicking RAM in and it’s been properly seated every time, this isn’t my first PC built. I get the 3 beep error with every slot except for the slot which I spilt the conductonaut thermal liquid in which I haven’t touched at all.
 

Darkbreeze

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Disassemble the build. Get a can of "electrical contact cleaner".

Turn the board upside down at about a 45 degree angle so that when you spray the contact cleaner into the DIMM slot it will run down and out of the DIMM slot. You will also want to get a can of compressed air.

Spray into the DIMM slot in a downwards facing direction, starting at the top of the slot and working your way down. Don't deplete the whole can at once. Spray the slot downwards from top to bottom, with light to medium pressure. Then wait five or ten seconds for the liquid metal to emulsify and then do it again. Use a flashlight and reading glasses or magnifying glass, if necessary, to determine if you have removed all the TIM from the DIMM slot.

Hopefully you did not already short anything out by powering the motherboard on with liquid metal IN the DIMM slot, which is highly possible. I'd suspect this is 100% what your issue is. I would not try to power on or use this board or components anymore until you clean out the DIMM slot FULLY. Liquid metal TIM is highly conductive and it's no stretch to allow that it's possible there is a short due to that spillage.

Sorry I didn't see that you had done that when I first read the original post, but I should have. Apologies for that.

You can get electrical contact cleaner at most home centers, ALL auto parts stores and sometimes at places like Walmart or other shopping centers. Do NOT use break cleaner or any other spray cleaner, ONLY use electrical contact cleaner. In a pinch, you could try to use isopropyl alcohol, same as for cleaning TIM off the CPU when changing paste, but it will be difficult to get it all out of the DIMM slot which is what makes the spray can contact cleaner so efficient with it's red straw that allows you to not only emulsify but also blast bits from deep in the slot, out. Be careful to not backsplash and get it in your eyes. Wearing safety glasses is probably a good idea if you have them. Also why you don't want to use more than medium-ish pressure.
 

MrPsychoticRage

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Disassemble the build. Get a can of "electrical contact cleaner".

Turn the board upside down at about a 45 degree angle so that when you spray the contact cleaner into the DIMM slot it will run down and out of the DIMM slot. You will also want to get a can of compressed air.

Spray into the DIMM slot in a downwards facing direction, starting at the top of the slot and working your way down. Don't deplete the whole can at once. Spray the slot downwards from top to bottom, with light to medium pressure. Then wait five or ten seconds for the liquid metal to emulsify and then do it again. Use a flashlight and reading glasses or magnifying glass, if necessary, to determine if you have removed all the TIM from the DIMM slot.

Hopefully you did not already short anything out by powering the motherboard on with liquid metal IN the DIMM slot, which is highly possible. I'd suspect this is 100% what your issue is. I would not try to power on or use this board or components anymore until you clean out the DIMM slot FULLY. Liquid metal TIM is highly conductive and it's no stretch to allow that it's possible there is a short due to that spillage.

Sorry I didn't see that you had done that when I first read the original post, but I should have. Apologies for that.

You can get electrical contact cleaner at most home centers, ALL auto parts stores and sometimes at places like Walmart or other shopping centers. Do NOT use break cleaner or any other spray cleaner, ONLY use electrical contact cleaner. In a pinch, you could try to use isopropyl alcohol, same as for cleaning TIM off the CPU when changing paste, but it will be difficult to get it all out of the DIMM slot which is what makes the spray can contact cleaner so efficient with it's red straw that allows you to not only emulsify but also blast bits from deep in the slot, out. Be careful to not backsplash and get it in your eyes. Wearing safety glasses is probably a good idea if you have them. Also why you don't want to use more than medium-ish pressure.
I will give this a go, although I already tried this with a motorised air cleaner thingy with different head attachments which didn’t help much. I will go get some and report back if I had any success, but it seems to be pretty deep in there.
Do you think I would be able to get a successful RMA if I send this back and clean it up and it still doesn’t work? I don’t have a lot of money now and really don’t want to fork out for another board. Cheers.
 

Darkbreeze

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Eh, well, uh. Ahem. No, probably not.

I mean, maaaaybe, but it would probably be more luck than anything if they accepted it on an RMA because clearly liquid metal in the DIMM slot isn't a manufacturing defect, and they are going to probably see that unless you do a really good cleaning job.

Even then, there might be discoloration of the PCB from using the contact cleaner although it won't harm anything it could be visibly discolored a tiny bit. A motorized air cleaner thingy, ain't gonna do the trick. I only suggested a can of compressed air so that you could blow the DIMM slot out as an additional measure to make sure everything is fully dry and little bits get out of there after you are done cleaning it with the contact cleaner.

Obviously, at this point, you are looking at more of an attempt to recovery the motherboard than anything else, because as of right now I'd assume it's unusable. You MIGHT be able to get that DIMM slot clean enough for it to work, IF there was no damage. The fact that you are getting a memory error suggests that there's a strong chance it might work, but I wouldn't bet large sums of cash on it.

Also, considering you did this in the first place, I'd SERIOUSLY take a look at the CPU and make sure that none got down in the CPU socket on the motherboard on on the contact side of the CPU, and that there are no bent pins on the motherboard CPU socket.

WHICH slot did you spill liquid metal in?
 

MrPsychoticRage

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It is spilt in the socket A1.
I will check the CPU tomorrow (PC is at a friends place) and see if any got in there, although I wouldn’t think that would produce the memory error.
I will try to clean it as best as possible, if still not working I’ll take my chances with the RMA, lol.
 

Darkbreeze

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Oh yes, it WOULD.

Bent CPU pins, whether on the motherboard or CPU itself, depending on if AMD or Intel, DEFINITELY can and DOES cause memory problems. Even a CPU cooler that is not evenly tightened can cock the CPU in the socket and cause both memory and graphical problems among other things.

The memory controller is IN the CPU, so it's absurd to think that problems, whether by bent pins or shorted pins from liquid metal in the socket, could not cause a problem with the memory. It can, and would, almost certainly, depending on where in the socket and which pins were affected.
 

MrPsychoticRage

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Oh yes, it WOULD.

Bent CPU pins, whether on the motherboard or CPU itself, depending on if AMD or Intel, DEFINITELY can and DOES cause memory problems. Even a CPU cooler that is not evenly tightened can cock the CPU in the socket and cause both memory and graphical problems among other things.

The memory controller is IN the CPU, so it's absurd to think that problems, whether by bent pins or shorted pins from liquid metal in the socket, could not cause a problem with the memory. It can, and would, almost certainly, depending on where in the socket and which pins were affected.
Ok well excuse my ignorance in the topic then lol, I will check tomorrow whether or not that is the issue
 

Darkbreeze

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It would be a good idea. Even if it turns out to NOT be the issue, it's another step in the process of figuring out where the problem is. You eliminate potential issues until whatever is remaining, however improbable, is the most likely cause in most cases.
 

Darkbreeze

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In point of fact, I would not be surprised to find that the motherboard AND CPU are shot, if you spilled liquid metal in both areas and then powered on the unit, but as I said, it's also probably worth spending seven bucks on a can of electrical contact cleaner to try and salvage it if possible. Keep in mind, there COULD also be a problem with any stick of memory that has been installed even in a different DIMM slot, so don't rule that out if a cleaning doesn't solve the issue.

There is a good reason why we don't recommend using liquid metal if you don't FULLY know what you are doing, and sometimes not even then. I won't use it at all.
 

MrPsychoticRage

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In point of fact, I would not be surprised to find that the motherboard AND CPU are shot, if you spilled liquid metal in both areas and then powered on the unit, but as I said, it's also probably worth spending seven bucks on a can of electrical contact cleaner to try and salvage it if possible. Keep in mind, there COULD also be a problem with any stick of memory that has been installed even in a different DIMM slot, so don't rule that out if a cleaning doesn't solve the issue.

There is a good reason why we don't recommend using liquid metal if you don't FULLY know what you are doing, and sometimes not even then. I won't use it at all.
Yes I will never be using it again for that reason. The applicator is very awful too and just dripped liquid metal when I wasn’t even touching the plunger. I already used an alcohol swab to clean the bit in between the ram slot and even then it was a tiny tiny dot. I really hope the other parts aren’t shot because of it, or that’s 2 grand down the drain and I’m back to where I started. I’m inclined to just buy a new mobo and go from there instead of risking shorting the system from repeated tries to fix it.
 
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Darkbreeze

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Might not be a bad idea to go straight to a new motherboard, at least to determine that the other parts are still ok AND to eliminate any potential from the motherboard itself creating further issues. Personally, I'd probably do exactly what I suggested but I totally understand wanting to eliminate one of the potential outcomes from a shorted board if that were the case, as well.
 

MrPsychoticRage

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Might not be a bad idea to go straight to a new motherboard, at least to determine that the other parts are still ok AND to eliminate any potential from the motherboard itself creating further issues. Personally, I'd probably do exactly what I suggested but I totally understand wanting to eliminate one of the potential outcomes from a shorted board if that were the case, as well.
In the case that the issue still persists from a new motherboard , what should my next course of action be? I don’t have spare DDR4 or a cpu to eliminate either of those from the equation. I appreciate your help mate, it has been very valuable.
 

Darkbreeze

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If you replace the motherboard the problem persists, then I really don't have any magic bullets for you, unfortunately.

I think it's unlikely that you'll find you have a damaged motherboard, and memory, and CPU, but it's possible anytime there is a short. The fact that the old motherboard actually runs, and gives you a memory error, is promising. It means something is working right.

If it were me, I'd just try it, with the new board, and see what happens. There's really not much else you can do to be honest.
 

MrPsychoticRage

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If you replace the motherboard the problem persists, then I really don't have any magic bullets for you, unfortunately.

I think it's unlikely that you'll find you have a damaged motherboard, and memory, and CPU, but it's possible anytime there is a short. The fact that the old motherboard actually runs, and gives you a memory error, is promising. It means something is working right.

If it were me, I'd just try it, with the new board, and see what happens. There's really not much else you can do to be honest.
Thank you my friend, I will update if anything changes!
 

MrPsychoticRage

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So new motherboard is in and I’m still getting the 3 beeps for memory error. Did everything perfect this time, no thermal metal stuff anywhere and all clicked in as usual. Any ideas? mad :(
 
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Darkbreeze

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Try only one stick, and then the other. Try it in the second slot away from the CPU.

After installing the stick or removing the other stick, try resetting the BIOS. As I said before, there is always a chance that the CPU or memory has been damaged but I'd again be surprised if BOTH sticks were damaged so hopefully at least one of them should work.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.



Did you get the exact same motherboard, or a different one? Did you buy this board new or used?

It's strange that you are getting the same error. It's possible that the memory is the problem but at this point it might almost be worth it to simply take it to a repair shop and bite the bullet on paying them to determine what is wrong since they have the extra parts to swap in and out and you likely do not. Just a thought, to maybe save you some frustration.
 

MrPsychoticRage

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Try only one stick, and then the other. Try it in the second slot away from the CPU.

After installing the stick or removing the other stick, try resetting the BIOS. As I said before, there is always a chance that the CPU or memory has been damaged but I'd again be surprised if BOTH sticks were damaged so hopefully at least one of them should work.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.



Did you get the exact same motherboard, or a different one? Did you buy this board new or used?

It's strange that you are getting the same error. It's possible that the memory is the problem but at this point it might almost be worth it to simply take it to a repair shop and bite the bullet on paying them to determine what is wrong since they have the extra parts to swap in and out and you likely do not. Just a thought, to maybe save you some frustration.
Tried doing CMOS and hard reset too, same error. I bought the exact same motherboard, a new one from the same store. I also tried the one stick in each slo with both ram sticks, same result. I ran it with no RAM installed, same result.
I’m beginning to think the CPU is bung for some reason, I simply can’t afford to take it to a store for repair or buy new parts so I’m at a loss as to what to do.
Because if I return it through RMA, it’s not faulty, then I’m even more cash drained as I have to pay for all that.
 

Darkbreeze

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Are you 100% certain that all of the standoffs in your motherboard tray that you use to attach the motherboard to the case, are directly lined up EXACTLY with the holes in the motherboard for the screws to go through? There is not even ONE single standoff that is up against the bottom of the motherboard in a location where no hole exists?

You are certain that the backplace for the CPU cooler is installed correctly and is not shorting out against any component on the bottom of the motherboard?

You are certain that the CPU cooler is installed correctly and is 100% fully and EVENLY seated against the CPU lid? Not tighter in one area than in another?

You have tried to boot the system with NOTHING connected to the motherboard except for one stick of memory, the CPU installed and the PSU 8 and 24 pin connectors attached? You DO have the CPU EPS connector attached, yes? It is a 4+4 pin connector that plugs in usually along the top edge of the motherboard somewhat near the CPU.

How old is that TX power supply? How long have you owned and been using it?

If none of these things are the issue, then it's looking a lot like it might have to be a CPU issue.

Perhaps you can get a very cheap compatible CPU for testing. I've seen Pentium G5400's on Ebay for around 30 bucks at times OR if you know somebody who has an 8th or 9th gen CPU that is willing to allow you to borrow it for testing, otherwise you're pretty much stuck with paying a shop to pop a CPU in there for testing OR sending it for RMA.

Are you 200% certain that you are installing the CPU correctly and that there are no bent pins on either motherboard from incorrect installation? Have to ask, you know. Happens a lot.

Did you buy the CPU new and if so, where did you buy it from?

This, is why I ask.

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/cpu-won’t-fit-in-motherboard.3411892/#21632440
 

MrPsychoticRage

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Are you 100% certain that all of the standoffs in your motherboard tray that you use to attach the motherboard to the case, are directly lined up EXACTLY with the holes in the motherboard for the screws to go through? There is not even ONE single standoff that is up against the bottom of the motherboard in a location where no hole exists?

You are certain that the backplace for the CPU cooler is installed correctly and is not shorting out against any component on the bottom of the motherboard?

You are certain that the CPU cooler is installed correctly and is 100% fully and EVENLY seated against the CPU lid? Not tighter in one area than in another?

You have tried to boot the system with NOTHING connected to the motherboard except for one stick of memory, the CPU installed and the PSU 8 and 24 pin connectors attached? You DO have the CPU EPS connector attached, yes? It is a 4+4 pin connector that plugs in usually along the top edge of the motherboard somewhat near the CPU.

How old is that TX power supply? How long have you owned and been using it?

If none of these things are the issue, then it's looking a lot like it might have to be a CPU issue.

Perhaps you can get a very cheap compatible CPU for testing. I've seen Pentium G5400's on Ebay for around 30 bucks at times OR if you know somebody who has an 8th or 9th gen CPU that is willing to allow you to borrow it for testing, otherwise you're pretty much stuck with paying a shop to pop a CPU in there for testing OR sending it for RMA.

Are you 200% certain that you are installing the CPU correctly and that there are no bent pins on either motherboard from incorrect installation? Have to ask, you know. Happens a lot.

Did you buy the CPU new and if so, where did you buy it from?

This, is why I ask.

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/cpu-won’t-fit-in-motherboard.3411892/#21632440
I am 100% sure about everything except for the standoffs, I’ll check those. The standoffs came preinstalled and it’s possible I forgot to take the unused ones off.
The power supply is brand new, as is every part in the build as I specified at the start of this post. I bought the CPU from pccasegear, a reputable computer part store in Australia.
I’m sure the cpu is installed correctly, and the cooler too. Especially given I’ve tried it with two boards. Will attempt an RMA I think.
 

Darkbreeze

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I would take the whole thing apart, and using my guide, see if anything doesn't jump out at you or at least whisper in your ear.

 

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