Question Processor speed incorrect ?

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
This is normal, speedboost adjusts core clocks based on load to save power when high performance isn't needed. Modern CPUs can boost to 4-5GHz under heavy single-threaded loads and drop to something like 800MHz or even full-stop (sleep) at idle.
 
Aug 5, 2020
18
0
10
0
but when i play some game then also it is not in full performance
This is normal, speedboost adjusts core clocks based on load to save power when high performance isn't needed. Modern CPUs can boost to 4-5GHz under heavy single-threaded loads and drop to something like 800MHz or even full-stop (sleep) at idle.
but when i play games then also it is not at its full speed
 

xravenxdota

Reputable
Aug 26, 2017
432
66
4,940
24
I actually had to dial in the numbers manually in the bios for my sisters core2duo dual core( i clocked it to 3.6 with a custom cooler for the fun of it 😂)just check in your bios if you can manually do it.Just be careful.The older motherboards change ram speed when you manually change clocks but i don't see that it would do that on stock clocks or you can also manually change ram speeds on some boards.
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
Yep, this is why I hate speedstep. The $5/yr saved isn't worth the aggravation.
Depending on how much you run your system on a daily basis, it can be quite a bit more than $5/year. Also, multiply that by a billion or so total PCs on the planet, that is quite a bit of power in aggregate. Modern CPUs can idle at somewhere in the neighborhood of 15W package power vs 100+W under all-cores load. Having dynamic clocks on modern PCs can quite easily save a whole lot more than $5/year.
 
Depending on how much you run your system on a daily basis, it can be quite a bit more than $5/year. Also, multiply that by a billion or so total PCs on the planet, that is quite a bit of power in aggregate. Modern CPUs can idle at somewhere in the neighborhood of 15W package power vs 100+W under all-cores load. Having dynamic clocks on modern PCs can quite easily save a whole lot more than $5/year.
Whole year's estimated running cost is $17.34:
https://www.cpubenchmark.net/compare/Intel-Core2-Quad-Q8400-vs-Intel-Core2-Quad-Q6600/1041vs1038

Energy is a resource, but so is time and money. For me, my time is most important. I'm glad that others think otherwise or a lot of power would potentially be wasted.
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
Energy is a resource, but so is time and money. For me, my time is most important. I'm glad that others think otherwise or a lot of power would potentially be wasted.
When SpeedStep is working correctly (ex.: not disabled for some random reason), it gives you all the performance the CPU is capable of without pissing away power when it isn't needed. Best of both worlds and it is usually plug-and-play.
 
When SpeedStep is working correctly (ex.: not disabled for some random reason), it gives you all the performance the CPU is capable of without pissing away power when it isn't needed. Best of both worlds and it is usually plug-and-play.
I've seen too many instances of it holding back performance like taking forever to throttle up--I don't have time for that because when I need something done, it needs to be done now. And if I don't need it, powering it off is easy enough.
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
I've seen too many instances of it holding back performance like taking forever to throttle up--I don't have time for that because when I need something done, it needs to be done now. And if I don't need it, powering it off is easy enough.
If you are still using a Core2Quad, you aren't in any particular hurry to do anything.

As for the ramp-up time, Intel CPUs since Haswell can go from sleep to max boost in something like 20 microseconds. That's why Haswell and newer CPUs (ATX 2.3x spec) require PSUs capable of coping with 0-100% CPU load transient at a rate of 10A per 10us.
 
If you are still using a Core2Quad, you aren't in any particular hurry to do anything.

As for the ramp-up time, Intel CPUs since Haswell can go from sleep to max boost in something like 20 microseconds. That's why Haswell and newer CPUs (ATX 2.3x spec) require PSUs capable of coping with 0-100% CPU load transient at a rate of 10A per 10us.
Right because even though everything is twice as fast now, things actually work twice as fast? hardly. :rolleyes: Don't confused hardware and software bloat with productivity gains...

For what I'm doing, even my fastest systems (much newer sockets) are still on par with today's speeds and I can hardly tell the difference. But slowing down the clock to 1/2 or whatever definitely makes a difference.

I don't think it's a hardware issue that keeps them from ramping up--just dumb algorithms in software like OSes that keep them slower longer than they need to be in an idiotic effort to save power. I see it on my thin clients too and the stupid things max out at like 15w for the whole thing--video performance slows down so much when they start clocking down, hence they are at 100% as well.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY