Question Recommendation for Air Coolers?

May 12, 2020
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Hello there,

Was looking to buy a new air cooler to replace my Corsair H60 (2018) AIO, and I was looking at a few air coolers that fit inside my case (Corsair 275R):

  • be quiet! Dark Rock 4 (pro/non-pro)
  • Cooler Master Hyper 212 (RGB/Black edition)
  • ARCTIC Freezer 34 eSports DUO
  • Noctua NH-D15 chromax.Black

Not sure if I should look at AIOs like the NZXT Kraken X63, because I would have to mount them on the front due to clearance issues with my motherboard.

Currently have 5 fans in total:
2 ML140s in the front as intake
2 ML120s on the top with 1 paired with the H60 radiator as exhaust
1 ML120 on the rear as exhaust

Any help with recommendations are appreciated, thank you c:
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
The Corsair 275R allows clearance for CPU coolers up to 170mm in height. In reality I would not use any cooler more than 169mm as there may be fitment issues.

Below is my list of preferred CPU AIR coolers, also known as Heatsink fans (HSF).

Do not look here for recommendations on water/liquid cooling solutions. There are none to be found.

A good air cooler works just as well for most applications. There are very few instances I can think of where an AIO will work better than a good air cooler, and even fewer where an AIO will outperform an air cooler if you are willing to buy the right air cooler and then level up by adding some even higher end fans to it.

Loops leak. Heatsinks don't. Pumps fail, FAR more often and usually with far worse consequences, than fans do.

And unlike a heatsink fan assembly, when your pump fails for 99% of AIO coolers, you will be replacing the whole thing, for another 100+ dollars, rather than just a 25 dollar investment for the failure of a fan. Especially since I've rarely seen dual fan coolers have both fans fail at the same time, but even if you factor in two fan failures that's still only about fifty bucks compared to the 100+ it will cost to replace an AIO with a failed pump. And you WILL have a failed pump on most AIO coolers within three years of purchase. Seeing one last longer than five years is possible, but it is not particularly common and we often, very often, see them fail at around the 3 year mark. Sometimes much sooner.

Pump quality and longevity is an area that needs GREAT improvement before AIO coolers will become a primary recommendation for me.

I see a lot of AIO coolers leak and damage hardware as well.

Certainly there are situations where an AIO is called for, or even preferred, but those are MOSTLY aesthetic considerations, because let's face it, a build with an AIO or custom loop generally "looks" a lot cleaner than one that has a big heatsink taking up half the real estate inside your case. When that is the case, I have recommendations for those as well, but I don't offer them unless somebody is specifically asking to go that route.[/B]

They are basically listed in order of preference, from top to bottom. To some degree that preference is based on known performance on similarly overclocked configurations, but not entirely. There are likely a couple of units that are placed closer to the top not because they offer purely better performance than another cooler which is below it, but potentially due to a variety of reasons.

One model might be placed higher than another with the same or similar performance, but has quieter or higher quality fans. It may have the same performance but a better warranty. Long term quality may be higher. It may be less expensive in some cases. Maybe it performs slightly worse, but has quieter fans and a better "fan pitch". Some fans with equal decibel levels do not "sound" like they are the same as the specific pitch heard from one fan might be less annoying than another.

In any case, these are not "tiered" and are not a 100% be all, end all ranking. They are simply MY preference when looking at coolers for a build or when making recommendations. Often, which HSF gets chosen depends on what is on this list and fits the budget or is priced right at the time due to a sale or rebate. Hopefully it will help you and you can rest assured that every cooler listed here is a model that to some degree or other is generally a quality unit which is a lot more likely to be worth the money spent on it than on many other models out there that might look to be a similarly worthwhile investment.

Certainly there are a great many other very good coolers out there, but these are models which are usually available to most anybody building a system or looking for a cooler, regardless of what part of the world they might live in. As always, professional reviews are usually an absolutely essential part of the process of finding a cooler so if you are looking at a model not listed here, I would highly recommend looking at at least two or three professional reviews first.

If you cannot find two reviews of any given cooler, it is likely either too new to have been reviewed yet or it sucked, and nobody wanted to buy one in order to review it plus the manufacturer refused to send samples out to the sites that perform reviews because they knew it would likely get bad publicity.

IMO, nobody out there is making better fans, overall, than Noctua, followed pretty closely by Thermalright. So if you intend to match case fans to the same brand on your HSF, those are pretty hard to beat. Of course, Corsair has it's Maglev fans, and those are pretty damn good too, but they tend to be more expensive than what are in my opinion better fans by these other two, so while they are good products they don't have the same noise characteristics and are probably better suited for configurations where sheer brute force is preferred over low noise that still gives good performance. Also, as with most fan models out there, don't look at the specifications for the non-RGB Maglev fan models and think that you'll be getting the same specs on any RGB versions, because you won't. Fans with RGB tend to sacrifice both maximum CFM and static pressure for the right to stuff the RGB electronics under the hood.


Noctua NH-D14 (Replace stock fans with NF-A14 industrialPPC 2000rpm)
Noctua NH-D15/D15 SE-AM4
Noctua NH-D14 (With original fans)
Thermalright Silver arrow IB-E Extreme
Phanteks PH-TC14PE (BK,BL, OR or RD)
Cryorig R1 Ultimate or Universal
Thermalright Legrand Macho RT
Thermalright Macho X2
Deepcool Assassin III
Scythe Ninja 5
Thermalright Macho rev. C
Thermalright Macho rev.B
Thermalright ARO-M14G (Ryzen only)
Thermalright Macho direct
Scythe Mugen 5 rev.B
Deepcool Assassin II
Be Quiet Dark rock Pro 4
Noctua NH-U14S
Thermalright true spirit 140 Direct
FSP Windale 6
Scythe Mugen max
BeQuiet dark rock (3 or 4)
Thermalright Macho SBM
Cryorig H5
Noctua NH-U12S
Arctic freezer 34 eSports Duo
Phanteks PH-TC14S
Phanteks PH-TC12DX (Any)
Cryorig H7
Deepcool Gammaxx 400
Cooler Master Hyper 212 (EVO, X, RGB. I'd only recommend this cooler if no other good aftermarket models are available to you.)



It may not be obvious, but is probably worth mentioning, that not all cooler models will fit all CPU sockets as aftermarket coolers generally require an adapter intended for use with that socket. Some coolers that fit an AMD platform might not fit a later AMD platform, or an Intel platform. Often these coolers come with adapters for multiple types of platforms but be sure to verify that a specific cooler WILL work with your platform before purchasing one and finding out later that it will not.

If you have questions about a specific cooler I'm always happy to have conversations about cooling, so please outline any specific questions you might have and we can discuss it.

One question that probably needs answered up front is what type of RAM you are using because on systems where tall RAM is used there might be a need to slide the front fan up on the cooler which could change the height of the cooler.
 
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May 12, 2020
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The Corsair 275R allows clearance for CPU coolers up to 170mm in height. In reality I would not use any cooler more than 169mm as there may be fitment issues.

Below is my list of preferred CPU AIR coolers, also known as Heatsink fans (HSF).

Do not look here for recommendations on water/liquid cooling solutions. There are none to be found.

A good air cooler works just as well for most applications. There are very few instances I can think of where an AIO will work better than a good air cooler, and even fewer where an AIO will outperform an air cooler if you are willing to buy the right air cooler and then level up by adding some even higher end fans to it.

Loops leak. Heatsinks don't. Pumps fail, FAR more often and usually with far worse consequences, than fans do.

And unlike a heatsink fan assembly, when your pump fails for 99% of AIO coolers, you will be replacing the whole thing, for another 100+ dollars, rather than just a 25 dollar investment for the failure of a fan. Especially since I've rarely seen dual fan coolers have both fans fail at the same time, but even if you factor in two fan failures that's still only about fifty bucks compared to the 100+ it will cost to replace an AIO with a failed pump. And you WILL have a failed pump on most AIO coolers within three years of purchase. Seeing one last longer than five years is possible, but it is not particularly common and we often, very often, see them fail at around the 3 year mark. Sometimes much sooner.

Pump quality and longevity is an area that needs GREAT improvement before AIO coolers will become a primary recommendation for me.

I see a lot of AIO coolers leak and damage hardware as well.

Certainly there are situations where an AIO is called for, or even preferred, but those are MOSTLY aesthetic considerations, because let's face it, a build with an AIO or custom loop generally "looks" a lot cleaner than one that has a big heatsink taking up half the real estate inside your case. When that is the case, I have recommendations for those as well, but I don't offer them unless somebody is specifically asking to go that route.[/B]

They are basically listed in order of preference, from top to bottom. To some degree that preference is based on known performance on similarly overclocked configurations, but not entirely. There are likely a couple of units that are placed closer to the top not because they offer purely better performance than another cooler which is below it, but potentially due to a variety of reasons.

One model might be placed higher than another with the same or similar performance, but has quieter or higher quality fans. It may have the same performance but a better warranty. Long term quality may be higher. It may be less expensive in some cases. Maybe it performs slightly worse, but has quieter fans and a better "fan pitch". Some fans with equal decibel levels do not "sound" like they are the same as the specific pitch heard from one fan might be less annoying than another.

In any case, these are not "tiered" and are not a 100% be all, end all ranking. They are simply MY preference when looking at coolers for a build or when making recommendations. Often, which HSF gets chosen depends on what is on this list and fits the budget or is priced right at the time due to a sale or rebate. Hopefully it will help you and you can rest assured that every cooler listed here is a model that to some degree or other is generally a quality unit which is a lot more likely to be worth the money spent on it than on many other models out there that might look to be a similarly worthwhile investment.

Certainly there are a great many other very good coolers out there, but these are models which are usually available to most anybody building a system or looking for a cooler, regardless of what part of the world they might live in. As always, professional reviews are usually an absolutely essential part of the process of finding a cooler so if you are looking at a model not listed here, I would highly recommend looking at at least two or three professional reviews first.

If you cannot find two reviews of any given cooler, it is likely either too new to have been reviewed yet or it sucked, and nobody wanted to buy one in order to review it plus the manufacturer refused to send samples out to the sites that perform reviews because they knew it would likely get bad publicity.

IMO, nobody out there is making better fans, overall, than Noctua, followed pretty closely by Thermalright. So if you intend to match case fans to the same brand on your HSF, those are pretty hard to beat. Of course, Corsair has it's Maglev fans, and those are pretty damn good too, but they tend to be more expensive than what are in my opinion better fans by these other two, so while they are good products they don't have the same noise characteristics and are probably better suited for configurations where sheer brute force is preferred over low noise that still gives good performance. Also, as with most fan models out there, don't look at the specifications for the non-RGB Maglev fan models and think that you'll be getting the same specs on any RGB versions, because you won't. Fans with RGB tend to sacrifice both maximum CFM and static pressure for the right to stuff the RGB electronics under the hood.


Noctua NH-D14 (Replace stock fans with NF-A14 industrialPPC 2000rpm)
Noctua NH-D15/D15 SE-AM4
Noctua NH-D14 (With original fans)
Thermalright Silver arrow IB-E Extreme
Phanteks PH-TC14PE (BK,BL, OR or RD)
Cryorig R1 Ultimate or Universal
Thermalright Legrand Macho RT
Thermalright Macho X2
Deepcool Assassin III
Scythe Ninja 5
Thermalright Macho rev. C
Thermalright Macho rev.B
Thermalright ARO-M14G (Ryzen only)
Thermalright Macho direct
Scythe Mugen 5 rev.B
Deepcool Assassin II
Be Quiet Dark rock Pro 4
Noctua NH-U14S
Thermalright true spirit 140 Direct
FSP Windale 6
Scythe Mugen max
BeQuiet dark rock (3 or 4)
Thermalright Macho SBM
Cryorig H5
Noctua NH-U12S
Arctic freezer 34 eSports Duo
Phanteks PH-TC14S
Phanteks PH-TC12DX (Any)
Cryorig H7
Deepcool Gammaxx 400
Cooler Master Hyper 212 (EVO, X, RGB. I'd only recommend this cooler if no other good aftermarket models are available to you.)



It may not be obvious, but is probably worth mentioning, that not all cooler models will fit all CPU sockets as aftermarket coolers generally require an adapter intended for use with that socket. Some coolers that fit an AMD platform might not fit a later AMD platform, or an Intel platform. Often these coolers come with adapters for multiple types of platforms but be sure to verify that a specific cooler WILL work with your platform before purchasing one and finding out later that it will not.

If you have questions about a specific cooler I'm always happy to have conversations about cooling, so please outline any specific questions you might have and we can discuss it.

One question that probably needs answered up front is what type of RAM you are using because on systems where tall RAM is used there might be a need to slide the front fan up on the cooler which could change the height of the cooler.
Hi Darkbreeze, thank you for your reply and great suggestions on air coolers.

With regards to the current kit of RAM I'm using, I have 8x2 sticks of Corsair Vengeance LPX 3200MHz, so I'd say they are pretty low profile.

I've taken a look at your recommendations for the different air coolers, and narrowed down some that I am interested in - based on factors like pricing, aesthetics and ease of installation.

Here are some of them (in no particular order):
  • Scythe Ninja 5 - this looks great, the price is also quite nice at $87 SGD (on Amazon)
  • Noctua NH-D15 SE-AM4 - doesn't look as nice but I'm sure it will compensate with its performance, and it still isn't that expensive at $127 SGD (on Amazon)
  • Phanteks PH-TC14PE (only the black version is available to me) - this looks great, pretty beefy in size but seems like it performs quite well and comes in at $113 SGD.
  • Scythe Fuma 2 - this looks and is priced similar to the Ninja 5, so I'm kinda lost between either.
The main concern I would have with getting any of these air coolers would be clearance, whether it would affect the RAM sticks should I consider getting another 2 sticks (for a total of 4, but not anytime soon). Side note, would it be fine if I installed one of the ML120s I currently have on the top of my case onto the air cooler, or would this be not be recommended?
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Ok, so you have a 275R and Corsair Vengeance DIMMs. What CPU are you running? What graphics card? Are you planning to overclock either of them?

Using an ML120 on a CPU cooler would depend entirely on what cooler, because many coolers have fans that are specifically designed to be high static pressure, while many case fans are not. Just depends on fan vs fan.

IF you are interested in using an AIO cooler, mounting them on the front is typically not only not a problem, it's preferred, because it's performance is going to be better using the cool outside ambient air in an intake configuration than it would on top using the already warm internal case air in an exhaust configuration, and if you top mount your radiator you always want it to be in an exhaust configuration. It's not acceptable to put a radiator on top and then orient the fans as intake.
 
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Ok, so you have a 275R and Corsair Vengeance DIMMs. What CPU are you running? What graphics card? Are you planning to overclock either of them?

Using an ML120 on a CPU cooler would depend entirely on what cooler, because many coolers have fans that are specifically designed to be high static pressure, while many case fans are not. Just depends on fan vs fan.

IF you are interested in using an AIO cooler, mounting them on the front is typically not only not a problem, it's preferred, because it's performance is going to be better using the cool outside ambient air in an intake configuration than it would on top using the already warm internal case air in an exhaust configuration, and if you top mount your radiator you always want it to be in an exhaust configuration. It's not acceptable to put a radiator on top and then orient the fans as intake.
Sorry for not clarifying on the specs for my system, I'm currently running a Ryzen 5 3600 (undervolted with an offset of -0.075V in BIOS) and I have a Zotac RTX 2060 Super Mini (stock). I don't have any plans on overclocking them because they are running pretty hot right now (69.5 on CineBench R20 for CPU and 83 running FurMark for the GPU).

As for whether I want air cooling or an AIO, I'm leaning more towards air coolers because of their price to performance, seeing how AIOs like the NZXT X62 are >$200 at retail prices (but there is one going for $170 because of a sale right now).
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
These are all very good choices. The Thermalright true spirit 140 direct, which looks small and not impressive, has much better performance than you might think. I've used it on several Ryzen builds that had the 3600 and a 3600x, and they were easily tamed by this unit. It has the additional benefits of not being huge and taking up all the real estate inside your case, being incredibly quiet and being FAR easier to install than practically any other cooler in it's performance range.

https://www.lazada.sg/products/thermalright-cpu-cooler-140mm-single-fan-side-flow-heat-pipe-direct-touch-structure-true-spirit-140-direct-i585870033-s1683962346.html?spm=a2o42.searchlist.list.2.619b7bb8bB3d8m&search=1

This is a somewhat larger, but even better performing product.

https://www.lazada.sg/products/thermalright-aro-m14-series-am4-dedicated-aro-m14orange-i585802905-s1683926532.html?spm=a2o42.searchlist.list.33.23c74758k0b0kj&search=1

And if you can find a Macho rev.b or rev.c, those are excellent as well.

Your case supports coolers up to 170mm and that includes the majority of CPU air coolers. There are very few taller than 170mm.

The Scythe products you are looking at are pretty good, but they are only 120mm coolers and are not going to have the same performance, especially not at the same noise levels, as these other models that use 140mm fans and therefore have larger dimensional heatsinks with more surface area. They will still work though, and a Ninja 5, which is pretty big itself, will do a pretty admirable job but it takes up just about all the available space inside your case. Not as bad as something like the D15, but you don't NEED a cooler that big and capable for the Ryzen 3600. It is not particularly high TDP and the only reason you are having issues is because the stock coolers that come with the Ryzen models are not very good.
 
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These are all very good choices. The Thermalright true spirit 140 direct, which looks small and not impressive, has much better performance than you might think. I've used it on several Ryzen builds that had the 3600 and a 3600x, and they were easily tamed by this unit. It has the additional benefits of not being huge and taking up all the real estate inside your case, being incredibly quiet and being FAR easier to install than practically any other cooler in it's performance range.

https://www.lazada.sg/products/thermalright-cpu-cooler-140mm-single-fan-side-flow-heat-pipe-direct-touch-structure-true-spirit-140-direct-i585870033-s1683962346.html?spm=a2o42.searchlist.list.2.619b7bb8bB3d8m&search=1

This is a somewhat larger, but even better performing product.

https://www.lazada.sg/products/thermalright-aro-m14-series-am4-dedicated-aro-m14orange-i585802905-s1683926532.html?spm=a2o42.searchlist.list.33.23c74758k0b0kj&search=1

And if you can find a Macho rev.b or rev.c, those are excellent as well.

Your case supports coolers up to 170mm and that includes the majority of CPU air coolers. There are very few taller than 170mm.

The Scythe products you are looking at are pretty good, but they are only 120mm coolers and are not going to have the same performance, especially not at the same noise levels, as these other models that use 140mm fans and therefore have larger dimensional heatsinks with more surface area. They will still work though, and a Ninja 5, which is pretty big itself, will do a pretty admirable job but it takes up just about all the available space inside your case. Not as bad as something like the D15, but you don't NEED a cooler that big and capable for the Ryzen 3600. It is not particularly high TDP and the only reason you are having issues is because the stock coolers that come with the Ryzen models are not very good.
Thanks for helping me find the product links on my local vendors, I'll take a look at them and hopefully come to a conclusion soon. I'll try looking for the Macho rev.b or c and see how they look.

Random question, what do you mean when you say "you are having issues is because the stock coolers that come with the Ryzen models are not very good"? I might be misunderstanding but I've never used the stock cooler that came with the Ryzen 5 3600, I've been using the Corsair H60 (2018) since the system was built.
 
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These are all very good choices. The Thermalright true spirit 140 direct, which looks small and not impressive, has much better performance than you might think. I've used it on several Ryzen builds that had the 3600 and a 3600x, and they were easily tamed by this unit. It has the additional benefits of not being huge and taking up all the real estate inside your case, being incredibly quiet and being FAR easier to install than practically any other cooler in it's performance range.

https://www.lazada.sg/products/thermalright-cpu-cooler-140mm-single-fan-side-flow-heat-pipe-direct-touch-structure-true-spirit-140-direct-i585870033-s1683962346.html?spm=a2o42.searchlist.list.2.619b7bb8bB3d8m&search=1

This is a somewhat larger, but even better performing product.

https://www.lazada.sg/products/thermalright-aro-m14-series-am4-dedicated-aro-m14orange-i585802905-s1683926532.html?spm=a2o42.searchlist.list.33.23c74758k0b0kj&search=1

And if you can find a Macho rev.b or rev.c, those are excellent as well.

Your case supports coolers up to 170mm and that includes the majority of CPU air coolers. There are very few taller than 170mm.

The Scythe products you are looking at are pretty good, but they are only 120mm coolers and are not going to have the same performance, especially not at the same noise levels, as these other models that use 140mm fans and therefore have larger dimensional heatsinks with more surface area. They will still work though, and a Ninja 5, which is pretty big itself, will do a pretty admirable job but it takes up just about all the available space inside your case. Not as bad as something like the D15, but you don't NEED a cooler that big and capable for the Ryzen 3600. It is not particularly high TDP and the only reason you are having issues is because the stock coolers that come with the Ryzen models are not very good.
I think I've found the Macho Rev. B, and it looks quite nice IMO, is this the right one?
https://www.amazon.sg/Thermalright-HR-02-Macho-Rev-B-Rev/dp/B00PKJ21LW/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=macho+rev+b&qid=1592790749&s=gateway&sr=8-1
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes, that is an EXCELLENT cooler. Even better if you add a second TY-147 fan to the back of it, but probably not necessary for that CPU.

As to the stock cooler, my bad, I was thinking you were running the stock cooler. Bottom line though, the H60 isn't a particularly capable cooler in my opinion. Configuration probably matter too though.

Where is it mounted? Is it in an intake or exhaust configuration? How old is it? If it's more than two years old then there is a good chance the pump is getting weak by now, as those older Corsair coolers didn't have very durable pump assemblies on them.
 
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Yes, that is an EXCELLENT cooler. Even better if you add a second TY-147 fan to the back of it, but probably not necessary for that CPU.

As to the stock cooler, my bad, I was thinking you were running the stock cooler. Bottom line though, the H60 isn't a particularly capable cooler in my opinion. Configuration probably matter too though.

Where is it mounted? Is it in an intake or exhaust configuration? How old is it? If it's more than two years old then there is a good chance the pump is getting weak by now, as those older Corsair coolers didn't have very durable pump assemblies on them.
It's currently mounted as a top exhaust with another ML120 beside it (radiator is closer to the front with a pull configuration). It's less than a year old, but when I was deep cleaning my case the radiator hit something and some of the fins are bent - about 6 - 10 of them are slightly bent and there's a lot of dust trapped inside that I can't seem to get out with my air duster.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
In the future, buy some cans of compressed air. They work a lot better than "air dusters". Or, maybe think about buying a small air compressor. That's an even better solution with MANY other highly useful prospects.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
I'd go with the Macho. You can Always undercool a cpu, but never over cool it with normal means. Having a giant cooler simply means you have greater capacity, which puts cpu wattage output lower on the curve. Basically that means your fans will never really ramp up with variable loads, only get slightly faster at times.

And I prefer liquid cooling, but air cooling on a 3600 in that case just makes more sense all around. The only reason to go liquid would be aesthetics, and thats personal to you.
 
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In the future, buy some cans of compressed air. They work a lot better than "air dusters". Or, maybe think about buying a small air compressor. That's an even better solution with MANY other highly useful prospects.
Hmm, buying a small air compressor is kinda out of the question for me right now. I'll just have to use the Opolar that I have right now and look into get compressed air soon.


I'd go with the Macho. You can Always undercool a cpu, but never over cool it with normal means. Having a giant cooler simply means you have greater capacity, which puts cpu wattage output lower on the curve. Basically that means your fans will never really ramp up with variable loads, only get slightly faster at times.

And I prefer liquid cooling, but air cooling on a 3600 in that case just makes more sense all around. The only reason to go liquid would be aesthetics, and thats personal to you.
I'll continue looking at reviews before making any final decisions, but right now I'm definitely leaning towards the Rev. B, just wondering if I'm able to install my extra ML120 so I don't have too much exhaust on the top that is exhausting the cool air from the front intake fans - either that or I can just sell the extra fan to save a bit of money.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Test it and see. But generally you get better airflow with just rear exhaust/top-rear exhaust, and not the top-front. That has a nasty habit of pulling air straight up from the intakes, as it's generally a stronger draw than the gpu fans. But take case temps as a whole, balance them out with gpu and cpu, and decide if having the fan is better, not having the fan or blocking off that vent entirely with a piece of cardboard or plastic etc.
 
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Test it and see. But generally you get better airflow with just rear exhaust/top-rear exhaust, and not the top-front. That has a nasty habit of pulling air straight up from the intakes, as it's generally a stronger draw than the gpu fans. But take case temps as a whole, balance them out with gpu and cpu, and decide if having the fan is better, not having the fan or blocking off that vent entirely with a piece of cardboard or plastic etc.
Alright, I'll take note of that.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes. Rear and Top-rear, as exhaust. Then, whatever intakes you want or have room for. Top-middle or Top-front exhaust fans tend to "steal" the cooler ambient airflow from the intake fans and take it right on out the top of the case before it ever has a chance to benefit the CPU cooler, memory or motherboard.

Where, exactly, are you wanting to use the ML120 at? Is this the fan that is currently on the radiator?
 
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Yes. Rear and Top-rear, as exhaust. Then, whatever intakes you want or have room for. Top-middle or Top-front exhaust fans tend to "steal" the cooler ambient airflow from the intake fans and take it right on out the top of the case before it ever has a chance to benefit the CPU cooler, memory or motherboard.

Where, exactly, are you wanting to use the ML120 at? Is this the fan that is currently on the radiator?
The ML120 that I want to take off is currently mounted on the radiator of the H60, which is mounted to the top-front of the case. If I were to get the air cooler, I wouldn't want to mount it on the top-front anymore after learning that it takes in the cooler air from the intake fans, so I was wondering if I could mount it to the air cooler like the Mugen Rev. B (maybe something like a push-pull configuration on the heatsink.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Don't confuse the Macho rev.b with the Mugen rev.b, as they are made by different companies, are not the same SIZE of heatsink and do not have anywhere near similar performance characteristics. That being said, your ML120 would "fit" the Mugen rev.b, if you had an extra set of fan clip retainers, but you would want to use it in the rear location on the heatsink IF you used it. Might look kind of funny with two completely different looking fans on there though.

It would NOT work on the Macho rev.b, since that is a 140mm heatsink, which is significantly larger.
 
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Don't confuse the Macho rev.b with the Mugen rev.b, as they are made by different companies, are not the same SIZE of heatsink and do not have anywhere near similar performance characteristics. That being said, your ML120 would "fit" the Mugen rev.b, if you had an extra set of fan clip retainers, but you would want to use it in the rear location on the heatsink IF you used it. Might look kind of funny with two completely different looking fans on there though.

It would NOT work on the Macho rev.b, since that is a 140mm heatsink, which is significantly larger.
Alright, thank you for clearing that up, I keep mistaking Macho Rev. B for Mugen Rev. B...
 

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