[SOLVED] Running 3 fans on a header with fan hub?

Jul 14, 2019
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So contacted MSI support, told me my motherboard headers each support 1 A.
I,m planning to run 3 CoolerMaster MasterFan MF120L Non LED on each of the two sysfan header through a fan hub. Rated safety current is 0.16A, so 3 fans will be 0.48 A on one header, so with the over current at startup, will this be a stable setup?

Ps; my case doesn't have a bay to fit a controller so this is why i'm looking into other options

Fans: https://www.coolermaster.com/catalog/coolers/case-fan/masterfan-mf120l-non-led/

Fan Hub: http://www.deepcool.com/product/dcoolingaccessory/accessory/2013-12/48_663.shtml
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
For splitters, there's always additional resistance, length of the wires after the header, plus any fan wiring. So I personally don't go by the 1A rule, but instead cut that short. 1-2 fans = 1A. 3 fans = 0.9A. 4 fans = 0.8A. This accounts for DC or pwm. Since startup motor loads are higher than running line amperage, about 1¼ - 1½ as much, and your fans are 0.16A or @ 0.24A startup, that'll put you at @ 0.72A at most, which for 3 fans is under my 0.9A limit with a little room to spare.

I only do it that way because fans at a full 12v actually take less amperage to start than fans set at 7v, which is usually as low as DC fans go, unless you get really good DC fans which can start at a mere 5v, drawing maximum amperage.

Basically, with those fans, you are good to go, no worries.
 

AllanGH

Estimable
It will be OK.

The usual motor start-up calc is 1.25 * running current, which would put you at 0.6A.

Of course, if you are using a powered hub, you have nothing to worry about. A hub with just parallel fan connections, though, you need to be mindful of your IT.
 
Agreed, this is fine. Just a small picky point by me. That Deepcool device you linked to is what I call a SPLITTER, not a Hub. A SPLITTER like that it has one "arm" to connect to a mobo fan header, and two or more outputs (in this case, 4 ports on a box) for the fans. It has NO connection to the PSU for additional power, so all power comes from the host header and you do need to pay attention to the total load, which you have done properly. A Hub is a different device that gets all power for its fans from a direct connection to the PSU, but it only works with 4-pin fan systems. You are using 3-pin fans, so a SPLITTER is the correct way. Also note that you will need to ensure that the mobo CHA_FAN or SYS_FAN header you use will need to be configured to use the older Voltage Control Mode (aka DC Mode), and not the new PWM Mode.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
For splitters, there's always additional resistance, length of the wires after the header, plus any fan wiring. So I personally don't go by the 1A rule, but instead cut that short. 1-2 fans = 1A. 3 fans = 0.9A. 4 fans = 0.8A. This accounts for DC or pwm. Since startup motor loads are higher than running line amperage, about 1¼ - 1½ as much, and your fans are 0.16A or @ 0.24A startup, that'll put you at @ 0.72A at most, which for 3 fans is under my 0.9A limit with a little room to spare.

I only do it that way because fans at a full 12v actually take less amperage to start than fans set at 7v, which is usually as low as DC fans go, unless you get really good DC fans which can start at a mere 5v, drawing maximum amperage.

Basically, with those fans, you are good to go, no worries.
 
Jul 14, 2019
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Thanks for all the input guys, I will go ahead and use this setup then, at least for now.
I was really concerned about overloading my headers so I appreciate the feedback alot.
 

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