Question Setting up a static ip.

moonyman213

Commendable
Dec 30, 2017
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Howdy.

I have a strange issue with setting up a static IP.
I've managed to do it. However, I'm losing internet access (parcially). Strangely, I still can use TeamSpeak, but neither of my internet browsers are letting me reach a site.
My final objective is to open ports. Since I don't have internet access, I can't test looking for the IP in the broswers.

How should I proceed?

[OS = Windows 7] >>added by moderator
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Make and model router? The router's admin pages may show a list of connected devices. Who has admin rights to the network router? You will need help from that person.

Are you sure that the established static IP address is outside of the router's allowed DHCP IP address range and that that static IP address is reserved for your device via the device's MAC?

How many other devices on your network?

Check your computer to ensure that only one network adapter is enabled - either wired or wireless. Not both at the same time.

What "site" are you trying to reach?

Open ports: The nmap command may be more helpful for your needs.

https://hakin9.org/nmap-cheat-sheet/

https://www.networkstraining.com/nmap-commands-cheat-sheet/
 

moonyman213

Commendable
Dec 30, 2017
9
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1,510
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Router: Motorola SBG901
I am the admin of the network. I can only modify it through my IPS' official website, but that only gives me basic settings.

I'm sure I've stablished a static IP. However, I can't confirm if the IP adress is outside the routers DHCP range.

At the moment, there are only two devices: my PC and my phone. Neither can access the routers configuration.

I'm confirmed that only the wireless adapter is enabled,
Some time ago, a lightning struck close to my home and burned my PC's ethernet port. I can only connect through the WI-FI signal (it is a hybrid modem: modem and router at the same time, provided by my ISP).

The sites I'm testing are reddit, google, youtube, and any that I have at hand in my bookmarks.

I'll check the nmap.

UPDATE: I changed the DNS Server to my IPS' one (not the one in 'ipconfig'). Now I can access any site without problems. However, I can't access my router's configuration.
 
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@moonyman213
What you describe is common. When you use DHCP (automatic IP assignment) the router will get an IP address, gateway, and DNS server IP addresses. When you use a static address, then you have to enter the IP address, gateway, and DNS server IP addresses. Any missing information will give you problems.

To find the address of your router, at your computer open a command prompt ("CMD" in the search bar). Type "ipconfig /all") into the command prompt and hit enter. This should list the IP information for your computer including the default gateway. The default gateway should be ip address of the LAN side of your router. Entering that IP address into a browser should get you into the routers configuration web page. Let us know if that doesn't work.
 

moonyman213

Commendable
Dec 30, 2017
9
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I borrowed a working router. It took some time to set it up.

"m/f" = modem/router = Motorola
"router" = borrowed D-Link DIR-600

ISP
>[coaxial]> modem/router >[ethernet]> router
This means that the coaxial cable enters the modem/router (provided by the ISP), and an ethernet cable goes from the m/r to my router.

Before the borrowed router, I could access the internet through the m/r's wi-fi signal. Nothing strange here. After plugging the router, I couldn't; not through the m/r's wi-fi nor through the router's wi-fi. However, I could access the router's configuration with the IP by connecting to the router's wi-fi.
Even though I could access the router's config, I couldn't access the internet. After playing around with the configuration, it magically got itself fixed. I can now access the internet using the router's wi-fi. However, I've lost the capability to access the router's configuration.

I was entering the wrong IP. I accidently found an alternative with a third party program that showed several unavailable IPs. Tried all and the last one was the one.

The only thing that changed in ipconfig is one of the DNS servers. Everything else has the same numbers.

I know I can give a call to my ISP and bridge the m/r. However, I'd like to fix the problematic access to my router's configuration.

The issue changed significantly. Should I make a new post?
 
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@moonyman213
The router behind a router configuration does add some complexity. I am wondering if you have accidently given both routers the same IP pool (or at least a pool from the same subnet).

See how this sounds ...
You static IP address is assigned to the Motorola WAN port.
The Motorola LAN port should be using a different subnet from the D-Link, so we would assign it something like 192.168.1.1/255.255.255.0.
The D-Link WAN port then should be automatically assigned by the Motorola. Something like 192.168.1.10/255.255.255.0
Now, the D-Link LAN port needs to be a different subnet, so we assign it 192.168.4.1/255.255.255.0.
Then, all your devices connected to the D-Link will have an address like 192.168.4.XX.

One note, plugging and unplugged an Ethernet cable does not always force a device to update it's IP address. After making changes to a device you should restart it or do "ipconfig /release" and "ipconfig /renew" from a command prompt.

If you get this setup correct, then you should be able to access the D-Link config page with 192.168.4.1 (or what ever you used) and the Motorola config page with 192.168.1.1.

Let us know.
 

moonyman213

Commendable
Dec 30, 2017
9
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1,510
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I apologize for the constant changes.

The last big update: I called my ISP and asked them to set the m/r into bridge mode. At this very moment, I am connected to my router's signal. It is set to dynamic IP (so I guess it's automatically getting an IP from the ISP). It is connected to my ISP m/r (which now is acting as a modem, so we'll call it now simply "modem"). I have internet access and router's configuration access.
I was given a bunch of information by the ISP. They gave me a public IP, two DNS servers, and a PPPoE code.

As of this moment, I don't have access to my ISP's modem. The wi-fi is off, and I don't have a working ethernet port. I know I'm a bit tight on resources...

Correct me if I'm wrong. At this moment, my router is in dynamic mode. Does this mean that it will get whatever the modem is sending? In that case, I should set the router to static IP. Then, I should set my PC to static IP as well; that way, it connects to the static IP of the router, thus, both being "synced".

Additionally, because of having the modem set to bridge, I can now modify the ports of my router (I ultimately want to open ports). So I guess I am a bit closer to the objective.
 
Correct me if I'm wrong. At this moment, my router is in dynamic mode. Does this mean that it will get whatever the modem is sending? In that case, I should set the router to static IP. Then, I should set my PC to static IP as well; that way, it connects to the static IP of the router, thus, both being "synced".
Life is always changing ... we better get use to it!

Your router is probably in dynamic mode (DHCP). It is getting what ever IP address your ISP is sending. While your modem is in bridge mode, all it does is convert the signal from the format used over Coax (DOCSIS probably ... Data Over Cable Service Interface Specification ) to Ethernet. No IP address, no filtering, just translating. Generally then, yes, you will set the WAN port IP address to the static address they gave you, along with the other information (DNS, gateway, etc). Your computer will also get a static address, but it will be in the same subnet as the LAN port of your router ( router is 192.168.0.1, then computer could be 192.168.0.2). This address should be outside the routers LAN side DHCP servers address pool. It gets confusing becuase on the WAN side your router acts as a DHCP client (receiving) and on the LAN side it acts as a DHCP server (giving out).

Here is the thing ... each device should have a unique IP address. If you set your computer and the router to the static IP address your ISP gave you (which it kinda sounds like you were saying) then when a device on the internet calls up that IP address they both answer and things don't work (ok, not really, but kinda sorta). The key is that each device gets their own IP address for things to work right.

Once you have that setup, then you can open ports on your router to allow your computer to receive incoming IP requests. The thing that might confuse you is that your computer is at 192.168.0.5 (or whatever), but your buddy on the internet is typing in the static address your ISP gave you. When you forward (open) port 21, you tell the router that when it receives a message on port 21 (FTP), then it should forward that to 192.168.0.5. The whole reason we do this mess is that we can have multiple devices (computer, phone, printer, etc) all use the same public IP address because as you know the number of IP addresses available is limited. The alternative would be to get a static iP address for every device on your network (kinda expensive and not worth it).

Hope that makes sense.
 

moonyman213

Commendable
Dec 30, 2017
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1,510
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Thanks for the patience and taking the time to explain. I really appreciate that.

I think (thought) I got it. As of this moment, everything is configure in such way that it lets players join my server, and they can see the server in the server list of their client.

I was writing a reply while also doing a few tests. I got to the desired result before posting the reply. This is a shorter version.

Did you notice how I said "thought"? Well, my router's IP is set to DHCP. However, people can access everything just fine. I thought that I had to connect each part in such way (with static IPs) that they would slide through all the devices. Like boxes that need to have the same female jacks so the cables can be connected between them. I can't figure out the gap that my router is right now.

Giving a bit more thought to it, I believe that what happened is that, as you said, my router is simply receiving the signal from the modem. Regardless of what happens to the router, if there is a bridge between other clients and my PC available, connections will be possible. The ports are opened with my PC's IP, so others can join.
My PC's static IP is set to the same as the router (minus the subnet).

TBH, I don't know what to ask. I honestly don't know what's happening, but it is somehow working. I don't know if I'm making
sense.

UPDATE: Naturally, up reinitiating everything, the server is no longer visible. I'm confident this has to do with the router changing IP.
UPDATE_2: Managed to set up a static IP for both PC and router. It worked normally until a few minutes ago. It suddenly lost connection. Setting the router back to DHCP gives back connection.
 
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My PC's static IP is set to the same as the router (minus the subnet).

UPDATE_2: Managed to set up a static IP for both PC and router. It worked normally until a few minutes ago. It suddenly lost connection. Setting the router back to DHCP gives back connection.
These statements concern me because it sounds like you are using 1 address on 2 devices (router and PC). This will cause problems.

Your static public IP address (the one your ISP gave you) should only be used on the WAN port of your router (of the 5 Ethernet ports, that's the one by itself). That is the only place. If you use the static public IP address on your computer (and it somehow works), then your computer is exposed to the internet and that increases the chance it can be hacked. The setup I describe above only allows some traffic (the traffic you want) to reach your computer which provides some security.
 

moonyman213

Commendable
Dec 30, 2017
9
0
1,510
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These statements concern me because it sounds like you are using 1 address on 2 devices (router and PC). This will cause problems.

Your static public IP address (the one your ISP gave you) should only be used on the WAN port of your router (of the 5 Ethernet ports, that's the one by itself). That is the only place. If you use the static public IP address on your computer (and it somehow works), then your computer is exposed to the internet and that increases the chance it can be hacked. The setup I describe above only allows some traffic (the traffic you want) to reach your computer which provides some security.
My PC's IP has the same three groups as the router's LAN. The only group that's changing is the last.
The problem is in the router. I made sure that the IP is not the same as my PC's. Here's what I do: I set the router to DHCP. I check the status and copy the IP and Gateway. I then set it to static IP and use the copied IP and Gateway the router automatically generated. It works for a while. Then, it suddenly loses connection with the modem. I need to set the IP back to DHCP, and repeat the process.
Bare in mind that I'm not able to modify my modem. The only way to access it would be over ethernet, but I don't have a working ethernet port —which I might skip with a ethernet>usb adapter in the near future—.
 
@moonyman213
Cable companies (and telephone companies) use a couple methods to ensure that someone has not plugged into the cable is stealing internet. One method uses the MAC address of the modem (the MAC address is a unique hardware identifier). You mentioned that your ISP supplied you with pppoe code (password?). This is another method of controlling who can connect. Did you do the PPPoE setup on your router? If not, watch this:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cVIU6qnHYzA


Then setup your static IP address with the information they gave you (if needed).
 

moonyman213

Commendable
Dec 30, 2017
9
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1,510
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I'm presented with this: https://imgur.com/a/S36Ubhx

I was given a public IP, two DNSs, and a PPPoE code that has 4 groups of letters and numbers. Example: abc 3 dfg 55.
My guess is that I will have to fill the IP adress field with an IP that looks like the given IP but with a different Host Identifier (4th group of an IP). The only field I need is the username, and even thought the password is already filled, I might need that, too.

Extra info:
The only types of internet connections I have available in the router are:
  • Static IP
  • DHCP
  • PPPoE (User and Pass)
  • PPTP (User and Pass)
  • L2TP (User and Pass)
  • Russia PPTP (Dual Access)
  • Russia L2TP (Dual Access)
 
@moonyman213
  1. User Name - I would try the email address given to you by your ISP. That is the most common.
  2. Password - I would try the PPPoE code they gave you ... kinda weird though ... you may need to call them to clarify these settings.
  3. IP Address - this should the public IP address they gave you ... if you change the last 3 numbers there is a chance that you will use an IP address that is assigned to someone else and that will cause problems.
  4. Select "Enter DNS Manually"
  5. Enter the DNS addresses they gave you. Later in life you may want to select other DNS addresses (google, OpenDNS, etc ... probably food for another thread).
  6. Max Idle time ... try 0. This should indicate infinite time. If this doesn't work, put in a very high number.
  7. MTU ... try 1500 ... at some later date you may want to determine the best MTU
  8. Connect mode ... always ... it looks grayed out. If the connection has to go through a reconnection each time you sit down there might be lag (like everything has to wake up before you can use it).
**** The PPPoE code ... does it look like A1-B2-C3-D4-E5-F6 ????? Which could be a MAC address.

**** The only other thought I have is that they want you to use the Static IP setup and gave you a PPPoE code, even though they don't want you to use it ... that seems odd to me ... but sometime people do odd things.
 
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moonyman213

Commendable
Dec 30, 2017
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I'm gonna try that and see how it goes.

The PPPoE code looks something like this: "abc 12 dfg 34"; four groups in total: two made of letters and two made of numbers.
 

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