Question Swapped HDD with SSD, very little improvement...

Nov 7, 2019
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I'll try to make this quick and not too long..
I'm upgrading an HP laptop I grabbed for almost nothing (I think the kid just didn't know what he did to make it so laggy so he felt it was worth very little.. Score for me!). I'm prolly going to grab a SATA adapter card and use an M.2 over a 2.5" SSD. The reason is because in my HP desktop, I changed the 3.5" HDD with a 2.5" 860 Evo and it made little to no difference, and it actually dropped to sata 1 from SATA 2..?? And I reinstalled the OS from a flash drive, updated drivers, individually updated storage controllers and etc, without success. So I got rid of it and grabbed a PCIe adapter card for 2 M.2 drives (SATA and NVMe) and put it in and what a difference! I couldn't figure out why the 2.5" was so slow and dropped to sata 1 (shown through Samsung magician) but the m.2 SATA, using the same SATA port, was so much better.. I'm asking because I could save a few bucks picking up a 2.5" SSD for this laptop over a card and am m.2 drive. I just have a bad taste over the 2.5" drives now.. Since they was the first 1 I messed with. It was brand new too.. whereas the m.2 SATA I grabbed was used.. I tried both of the sata ports on the desktop board too btw.. anyone have any insight as to why it could've been so slow? I tried 2 different new SATA cables as well. Nothing I did worked until I started using the m.2 PCIe adapter.
Thanks for any and all input!
 
Lot of text there, but you actually didn't provide any relevant information.
laptop model name?
technical specs of desktop pc?
model names of ssd-s used?
link to m.2 pcie adapter product page?

BTW M.2 pcie adapters usually are compatible with nvme drives (not sata).
Those that are compatible with sata drives usually just provide power from pcie slot, but data connection requires sata cable from the adapter to motherboard.
 
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In some older motherboards, the sata controller was not intel and were terrible performers.
That might explain the lack of performance.

Go ahead and plan o replacing the 2.5" laptop ssd with the 860 evo.
This is easily done using the samsung ssd migration app.
I have done this in a large number of laptops with great improvement in performance.
 
Nov 7, 2019
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Lot of text there, but you actually didn't provide any relevant information.
laptop model name?
technical specs of desktop pc?
model names of ssd-s used?
link to m.2 pcie adapter product page?

BTW M.2 pcie adapters usually are compatible with nvme drives (not sata).
Those that are compatible with sata drives usually just provide power from pcie slot, but data connection requires sata cable from the adapter to motherboard.
Yes I am aware of that.. I didn't feel as if the exact model was necessary but the desktop issue was with an HP Compaq pro 4000 sff, and the current laptop is an HP 15-f387wm. I have 3 different Intel cpu's for the desktop that I installed and then even reinstalled windows with on the 2.5" drive.. with a format from the command line within the setup itself.. I didn't get why, while using the same SATA connector for both and different power supplies, the 2.5" was bottlenecked and the m.2 wasn't.. I am aware that most adapters are for NVMe.. that's not a problem, I've got a handful to look more into.. the problem is why it was bottlenecked. I don't have a very positive experience with the 2.5" drives based on the only 1 I messed with, but lots of positive from every m.2 drive I've played around with.. if it was something simple I overlooked, then cool, problem solved. If not, I'm not going to bother with another 1. And yes, it was a lot, my apologies.
So based on there info I've given, would have any ideas why the 2.5" was bottlenecked? I honestly can't openly say that I missed anything. I would like to think I did though! Gonna order 1 of these 2 today.
 
HP Compaq pro 4000 sff - is Core2 duo era pc.
It doesn't support sata3. Max it can support is sata2.

You still haven't provided any info about your PCIE M.2 adapter.
I'd imagine, if your adapter had sata3 controller onboard, then connected M.2 sata drive would be able to operate at sata 3 speeds (instead of operating at sata1 or sata2 available on motherboard).
 
Nov 7, 2019
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I never expected SATA 3 so I'm unsure of where that expectation came from.... I simply said it was SATA 2 running at SATA 1 on the 2.5" SSD... Am I speaking Chinese here?!! This is what's wrong with online professionals, right here.. I stated the concern, but here we go with a dance around any real knowledge...
I don't care that it's not SATA 3.. the HDD installed was SATA 3, I never said the PC was.. and considering I got it to boot from the NVMe before, I am pretty sure I just might know it's not SATA 3.. and if it was, who cares.. Still doesn't explain why it did what it did...
but thanks for stating everything that's easily found in a quick Google search... Waste of time to even reply...LOL but thanks for the attempt there bud
 
A bottleneck implies that a faster device somehow makes the whole worse.
In what way do you see a "bottleneck"
The vastly smaller latency of any ssd compared to a conventional HDD should be very apparent in random I/O operations.
Your specs say sata 2.
The main difference in performance between sata2 and sata3 is sequential performance.
Sata3 connection is some 2x that of sata 2.
Random I/O will be essentially the same.
There can be a difference in performance if the ssd addressing is not on a 4k boundary.
Run as ssd. you should see in green if your setup is on a 4k boundary.
It would seem that there is a problem with your native sata adapter.
Was it set to ahci and not ide?


m.2 is a size standard, not a performance standard.
You can get m.2 in sata or pcie protocol.

Is the "botleneck" just a feeling or a benchmark test?
 

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