Question Switching SSD (with Win10) to new system.

Dansaj

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Dec 26, 2014
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My old system died so I just decided to build a new one(https://de.pcpartpicker.com/list/pgZ2pG) .
Now I dont want to reinstall windows because I have a lot of stuff on my SSD etc.
So I was thinking if I could just plug it into my new system and somehow get it to work.
I have a spare 120GB SSD to work with, where my OS and all my files could fit.
Could it be done ? I really hope so, but keep in mind. I cant fire up my old system and do anything. Because it died.
Thanks
 

Satan-IR

Honorable
New build with new board you'd need to install Windows afresh and can't boot and use that old Windows. Is the specs in your signature the dead system?

You can do a clean install of Windows on the spare 120GB SSD and then connect the SSD with "your stuff" and try accessing your files on it. You can't run installed software on the old one, hardware too different and would have numerous issues such as driver issues etc.

That RMx 750 PSU is a very good unit but way more than you need with that CPU+GPU.
 
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USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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AMD Athlon x4 760k 4,0 ghz --> Ryzen 7 3700.

You need a clean install.

When moving to new hardware like this, there are 3 basic outcomes:
  1. It boots up just fine
  2. It fails completely
  3. It boots up,. but you're chasing issues for weeks.
Here, I'd bank on #2.


Windows can be quite picky about the hardware it is originally installed on, and the farther apart the old and the new...the less likely it is to work.
You could try it, but be prepared for complete fail.
 
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Dansaj

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Dec 26, 2014
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New build with new board you'd need to install Windows afresh and can't boot and use that old Windows. Is the specs in your signature the dead system?

You can do a clean install of Windows on the spare 120GB SSD and then connect the SSD with "your stuff" and try accessing your files on it. You can't run installed software on the old one, hardware too different and would have numerous issues such as driver issues etc.

That RMx 750 PSU is a very good unit but way more than you need with that CPU+GPU.
I was going to go for CX650 but people said the Vega is very power hungry and I didnt want to risk anything. And I got the RX brand new for very cheap.
I will do as you say and do a clean install.
 

Dansaj

Reputable
Dec 26, 2014
251
0
4,810
7
AMD Athlon x4 760k 4,0 ghz --> Ryzen 7 3700.

You need a clean install.

When moving to new hardware like this, there are 3 basic outcomes:
  1. It boots up just fine
  2. It fails completely
  3. It boots up,. but you're chasing issues for weeks.
Here, I'd bank on #2.


Windows can be quite picky about the hardware it is originally installed on, and the farther apart the old and the new...the less likely it is to work.
You could try it, but be prepared for complete fail.
Is there a way to avoid buying a new windows ?
Like if i do a fresh install of Windows.Could I somehow grab the license from it ?

Also I have some files on my spare 120GB SSD , can I install windows on it and keep the files still ?
 
Last edited:
You had to use microsoft account with admin privileges and login into your pc. This results in license being linked to your microsoft account.

If you have never used microsoft account and used local account only, then license would not be linked. You'll have to contact microsoft support then.
 
There IS an alternative way to get what you want.

It is called sysprep:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/manufacture/desktop/sysprep--generalize--a-windows-installation

You have to perform it on your old rig, then shutdown the PC and never boot this drive again on the same rig. Install it into your new one, and you will basically only have to fully reinstall all drivers, but all data and apps will remain. some applications will require you to re-enter registration keys or activation data (adobe apps do that usually) but basically that's it.

You will end up with clean drive but keep all your apps and data. Tried and tested it many times in many years, works like a charm.
 

USAFRet

Titan
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Mar 16, 2013
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152,940
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There IS an alternative way to get what you want.

It is called sysprep:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/manufacture/desktop/sysprep--generalize--a-windows-installation

You have to perform it on your old rig, then shutdown the PC and never boot this drive again on the same rig. Install it into your new one, and you will basically only have to fully reinstall all drivers, but all data and apps will remain. some applications will require you to re-enter registration keys or activation data (adobe apps do that usually) but basically that's it.

You will end up with clean drive but keep all your apps and data. Tried and tested it many times in many years, works like a charm.
Sysprep is sometimes an option, but....
"My old system died so ..."

Not in this case, unfortunately.
 
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