[SOLVED] Will G Sync Solve All Display Probelms?

tunatuna302

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I have been having lots of issues with screen stuttering I believe, with my rtx 2070 and my non g sync monitor turns out to not work together because when you dont have frame sync with a monitor, you will get screen stuttering, tearing, etc. when under 144fps for my problem, since my monitor is 144hz. My question was if I buy this amazing cheap deal G Sync monitor,


,will I get no tearing, or any screen artifacting, stuttering, etc. no matter what when below 144fps on 165hz, or 144hz? this monitor has overclocking too I think, will overclocking monitor make me not being able to use g sync?
 
What monitor do you currently have? Does it happen to support FreeSync over a DisplayPort connection? Nvidia recently added support for DisplayPort adaptive sync that should work with most FreeSync displays once enabled in the settings.
 

Gmoney06ss

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I don't have a g sync monitor and haven't experienced any screen stuttering or tearing. I know not much help, but you may have other issues than the monitor causing your issues.
 

tunatuna302

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What monitor do you currently have? Does it happen to support FreeSync over a DisplayPort connection? Nvidia recently added support for DisplayPort adaptive sync that should work with most FreeSync displays once enabled in the settings.
my monitor is displayport, and freesync, aoc ag241qx, but unfortunately the new driver update didn't give me working g sync
 

tunatuna302

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I need a really short and fast answer please, since the offer ends very, very, soon.
I actually worked on the problem that g sync wasnt working for a week straight, but no hope. I looked at nvidia's list and it said a monitor called ag241qg4 which isn't even a monitor according to AOC, all im looking for is a brief answer for my question
 

Gmoney06ss

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I-5 6600k@4.6/RTX 2080. And I have a small understanding of what g sync does, but I would maybe not a complete understanding. Like I said no expert, just trying to help ya not waste unneeded money. If you feel the need to upgrade to a full g sync panel, I'm sure it would be a good buy. And may even help a little, but I still don't think an adaptive sync is the cause of stuttering. Again I may be wrong, and hope someone else can chime in with a more solid answer for you.
 
Your existing monitor appears to actually be one of the dozen FreeSync displays that are officially certified by nvidia as being "G-Sync compatible", so G-Sync should presumably work even without enabling it manually in Nvidia's control panel, provided you have the latest nvidia drivers installed...


Even if it wasn't though, adaptive sync should work on monitors that support FreeSync over a DisplayPort connection. You are using a DisplayPort cable, rather than HDMI or DVI, right? Did you try what they describe in this video for enabling it? You can skip to 4:50 for the relevant part about enabling G-Sync on a FreeSync display, though I suspect it should get detected and enabled automatically on your screen...

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=icJnTUAaB9Y
 
that monitor you posted is the 2017 24" model, and I have the 2016 27" model that is 144Hz and it's fantastic as a monitor.

To answer some of your burning questions it's simple, as long as the frame rate of the game you are playing is below the refresh rate limit of the monitor, then G-Sync will work and remove the tearing.

Is it worth it to get G-Sync? Yes. So worth it.

What G-Sync is and how it works is fairly simple as well (at least the way I'm about to explain it is lol)

Unlike conventional options such as V-Sync where it's software that limits the GPU's output to match the monitor, and tells it to wait when it's going a little too fast, (which is what causes the occasional spike, and the input latency), G-Sync is a hardware solution, where it's a module that is installed onto a monitor that instead, gives the monitor the ability to adapt its refresh rate to match whatever the GPU is pushing out, as long as it isn't going beyond the refresh rate limitation of the monitor.

Thusly removing screen tearing, but without having to limit the FPS to a specific value and maintaining less input latency than with V-Sync.

However, since as the above poster mentioned, your monitor is a supported FreeSync monitor, you can try using that instead first to see if it'll work or not.
 

tunatuna302

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that monitor you posted is the 2017 24" model, and I have the 2016 27" model that is 144Hz and it's fantastic as a monitor.

To answer some of your burning questions it's simple, as long as the frame rate of the game you are playing is below the refresh rate limit of the monitor, then G-Sync will work and remove the tearing.

Is it worth it to get G-Sync? Yes. So worth it.

What G-Sync is and how it works is fairly simple as well (at least the way I'm about to explain it is lol)

Unlike conventional options such as V-Sync where it's software that limits the GPU's output to match the monitor, and tells it to wait when it's going a little too fast, (which is what causes the occasional spike, and the input latency), G-Sync is a hardware solution, where it's a module that is installed onto a monitor that instead, gives the monitor the ability to adapt its refresh rate to match whatever the GPU is pushing out, as long as it isn't going beyond the refresh rate limitation of the monitor.

Thusly removing screen tearing, but without having to limit the FPS to a specific value and maintaining less input latency than with V-Sync.

However, since as the above poster mentioned, your monitor is a supported FreeSync monitor, you can try using that instead first to see if it'll work or not.
I have an nvidia card and intel cpu so I really dont think freesync will work for me, but thanks for the answer, I bought a dell 165hz g sync for just 320 bucks it's competitors are 400+! It will come in a few days and I'll see if my problem will be solved, thanks.
 

tunatuna302

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Your existing monitor appears to actually be one of the dozen FreeSync displays that are officially certified by nvidia as being "G-Sync compatible", so G-Sync should presumably work even without enabling it manually in Nvidia's control panel, provided you have the latest nvidia drivers installed...


Even if it wasn't though, adaptive sync should work on monitors that support FreeSync over a DisplayPort connection. You are using a DisplayPort cable, rather than HDMI or DVI, right? Did you try what they describe in this video for enabling it? You can skip to 4:50 for the relevant part about enabling G-Sync on a FreeSync display, though I suspect it should get detected and enabled automatically on your screen...

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=icJnTUAaB9Y
So, I painstakingly made research about why my monitor can't benefit from this new feature for like a week straight, and I did everything told in the video you sent. I even contacted Nvidia support and they made me change about a billion 3D settings that didn't help. And also, my monitor switches to freesync automatically after I enable g sync. Same stuttering problem occurs when g sync on, even there is constant freezing in some games and according to AOC, the AG241QG4 isn't even a monitor?!?!!
 

tunatuna302

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So I checked your list and I don't know how nvidia managed to get g sync to work on my monitor, but they failed to help me. Idk if my monitor can truly use g sync or not now, but I can't refund this monitor
 

tunatuna302

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Can the problem be with the graphics card? Like I don't think it is. Like what is are the odds I did anything wrong installing the card and it affected ONLY g sync?
 
Same stuttering problem occurs when g sync on, even there is constant freezing in some games and according to AOC, the AG241QG4 isn't even a monitor?!?!!
I thought you said your monitor was the AG241QX. Their AG241QG is a version that includes a G-Sync scaler, while the QX includes a FreeSync-compatible scaler, both of which should be compatible with adaptive sync on nvidia's cards now. Perhaps the QG4 was a typo in nvidia's release, or maybe an alternate product name they plan to use for that screen.

If your monitor "switches to FreeSync automatically" when G-Sync is enabled, then that would imply that adaptive sync should be working. It would be referred to as FreeSync on the screen, and G-Sync in nvidia's settings. "Freezing" and "stuttering" doesn't seem like something that would be directly related to adaptive sync though.

Have you checked your CPU and GPU temperatures while gaming, and made sure that one or the other isn't overheating? Maybe also run a userbench test and post a link to the results here so we can see if some component might be having performance issues...
https://www.userbenchmark.com
 

tunatuna302

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I thought you said your monitor was the AG241QX. Their AG241QG is a version that includes a G-Sync scaler, while the QX includes a FreeSync-compatible scaler, both of which should be compatible with adaptive sync on nvidia's cards now. Perhaps the QG4 was a typo in nvidia's release, or maybe an alternate product name they plan to use for that screen.

If your monitor "switches to FreeSync automatically" when G-Sync is enabled, then that would imply that adaptive sync should be working. It would be referred to as FreeSync on the screen, and G-Sync in nvidia's settings. "Freezing" and "stuttering" doesn't seem like something that would be directly related to adaptive sync though.

Have you checked your CPU and GPU temperatures while gaming, and made sure that one or the other isn't overheating? Maybe also run a userbench test and post a link to the results here so we can see if some component might be having performance issues...
https://www.userbenchmark.com
https://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/14761718, cpu after a little bit of gaming is ~40 and gpu was max 71 celsius
 

tunatuna302

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I have an RTX 2070 and had an AOC AG241QX. I was having issues with stuttering when my gpu was not performing as well as my monitor refresh rate 144hz, (btw there is no tearing or stuttering or input lag when above 144fps). I was hopeless of trying to get G Sync working after the new driver update. I finally bought a G Sync monitor. I was told that the issue would be fixed if I bought G Sync and that G Sync was totally worth it. Then I launched up a game on my Dell S2417DG, but still the same problem. Then I searched up what the problem could be. I saw that G Sync only syncs your fps to your monitor, so when I capped my fps to 60 on a game, G Sync would only give me 60hz?! I thought that was terrible and questioned myself should I have not bought G-Sync? Why can't I just play at 60fps 144-165hz no stutter? What is the necessity of G-Sync and why is it so worth it for my situation? What will fix my problem? I research more than I play, and I finally want to game...
 
Please take the time to read fully first. Don't start doing things as you read.
Especially read the last part and see if that's the issue before going through and doing other things.

you don't cap your framerate with V-Sync or anything like that. if there is an option in game settings to limit framerate to a specific amount, limit it to any amount that is below the refresh rate of the monitor.

If there is no option to limit FPS, can always crank up the graphic settings until your frame rate stays below the limit.

Also, nobody ever said G-Sync would fix stuttering. You asked if G-Sync is worth it and if it would remove the screen tearing and yes, G-Sync will do that, but stuttering is a completely different thing.

Stuttering can be a GPU issue, but GPU isn't the only thing that can cause stuttering. CPU, RAM, drivers, and storage can all cause stuttering.

To be able to use G-Sync, you need to enable it for both full screen and windowed applications that way, and it's always best to run your games in full scree and not borderless.
Disabling full screen optimization on games games can also help.

Disabling all gamebar/dvr related services in Windows settings is also a must.

make sure you have DirectX properly installed and updated.

Best way to do that is to download and install the SDK
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=6812

Make sure windows is fully updated.

Make sure you have the latest drivers installed for your hardware and hardware controllers.

But again, this is for stuttering.

And according to your latest post, you are also getting screen tearing when G-Sync is enabled?

Also, your post is a little confusing.
You asked specifically and I shall qoute:

Why can't I just play at 60fps 144-165hz
And what you just said right there is the same as saying you want to play at 60fps, but while playing at 144-165fps?

Frame rate, and refresh rate are tied together.

If you play at 60fps, then the refresh rate of the monitor at that moment is 60Hz because 60Hz means that the monitor is refreshing 60 times per second, and when you play a game at 60fps, (and synchronize using whatever sync method available), then the monitor will be able to display each individual frame per second because they match.

Now, if what you are saying is you enabled V-Sync and limited the frame rate in game to 60fps/60Hz, and you are saying that nvidia control panel is only letting you select a 60Hz option for your monitor at that moment, then that is because you enabled V-Sync.

If what you are saying is that you didn't enable V-Sync but you set the in game limiter to 60fps/60Hz, and nvidia control panel is only letting you select 60Hz, then we can troubleshoot that.

But most importantly, if what you are saying is that you can't enable G-Sync or you are saying that nvidia control panel doesn't let you select anything but 60Hz no matter what, or both, then I will say you need to make sure you are connecting to the monitor using a Display Port cable.
HDMI will not cut it.
 

tunatuna302

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Please take the time to read fully first. Don't start doing things as you read.
Especially read the last part and see if that's the issue before going through and doing other things.

you don't cap your framerate with V-Sync or anything like that. if there is an option in game settings to limit framerate to a specific amount, limit it to any amount that is below the refresh rate of the monitor.

If there is no option to limit FPS, can always crank up the graphic settings until your frame rate stays below the limit.

Also, nobody ever said G-Sync would fix stuttering. You asked if G-Sync is worth it and if it would remove the screen tearing and yes, G-Sync will do that, but stuttering is a completely different thing.

Stuttering can be a GPU issue, but GPU isn't the only thing that can cause stuttering. CPU, RAM, drivers, and storage can all cause stuttering.

To be able to use G-Sync, you need to enable it for both full screen and windowed applications that way, and it's always best to run your games in full scree and not borderless.
Disabling full screen optimization on games games can also help.

Disabling all gamebar/dvr related services in Windows settings is also a must.

make sure you have DirectX properly installed and updated.

Best way to do that is to download and install the SDK
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=6812

Make sure windows is fully updated.

Make sure you have the latest drivers installed for your hardware and hardware controllers.

But again, this is for stuttering.

And according to your latest post, you are also getting screen tearing when G-Sync is enabled?

Also, your post is a little confusing.
You asked specifically and I shall qoute:



And what you just said right there is the same as saying you want to play at 60fps, but while playing at 144-165fps?

Frame rate, and refresh rate are tied together.

If you play at 60fps, then the refresh rate of the monitor at that moment is 60Hz because 60Hz means that the monitor is refreshing 60 times per second, and when you play a game at 60fps, (and synchronize using whatever sync method available), then the monitor will be able to display each individual frame per second because they match.

Now, if what you are saying is you enabled V-Sync and limited the frame rate in game to 60fps/60Hz, and you are saying that nvidia control panel is only letting you select a 60Hz option for your monitor at that moment, then that is because you enabled V-Sync.

If what you are saying is that you didn't enable V-Sync but you set the in game limiter to 60fps/60Hz, and nvidia control panel is only letting you select 60Hz, then we can troubleshoot that.

But most importantly, if what you are saying is that you can't enable G-Sync or you are saying that nvidia control panel doesn't let you select anything but 60Hz no matter what, or both, then I will say you need to make sure you are connecting to the monitor using a Display Port cable.
HDMI will not cut it.
Thank you for this very detailed answer. To check if ALL of my drivers are installed, do you recommend a program or anything that shows me what drivers that need to be updated? As far as I remember, I downloaded my display drivers, ethernet driver, wifi driver, and audio driver. Also, does G-Sync need to be turned off for your stutter solution or is it fine if it is on?
 
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no, you download and install the latest drivers from your motherboard manufacturer.
this includes chipset divers, sata drivers, etc.
And if you have an SSD, check to see if it has drivers offered by the manufacturer.
Display drivers should be gotten from Nvidia.

Can get drivers without GeForce experience here
https://www.nvidia.com/Download/index.aspx?lang=en-us

Or get them bundled with GeForce experience software here
https://www.geforce.com/drivers

I would link you to other driver downloads but I don't know your hardware beyond the GPU but I'm sure you can figure that one out easily enough.

Also, if there happens to be multiple revisions of your motherboard, you can check the revision number by looking for the text that is printed on the motherboard.

Usually in the bottom left corner of the board.
 

tunatuna302

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no, you download and install the latest drivers from your motherboard manufacturer.
this includes chipset divers, sata drivers, etc.
And if you have an SSD, check to see if it has drivers offered by the manufacturer.
Display drivers should be gotten from Nvidia.

Can get drivers without GeForce experience here
https://www.nvidia.com/Download/index.aspx?lang=en-us

Or get them bundled with GeForce experience software here
https://www.geforce.com/drivers

I would link you to other driver downloads but I don't know your hardware beyond the GPU but I'm sure you can figure that one out easily enough.

Also, if there happens to be multiple revisions of your motherboard, you can check the revision number by looking for the text that is printed on the motherboard.

Usually in the bottom left corner of the board.
I want to tell you a few questions I have.

1- The method you are telling me to do will fix stuttering right? If my issue is really stuttering because as far as I know, stuttering is when you have a high refresh rate monitor like 144hz, and if you drop under 144fps, it will not be smooth and it will feel like playing at 60hz back again. And this is my situation, is my problem really stuttering?

2- Did I buy G-Sync for nothing, but just a misunderstood info?

3- Is there another free way to solve my problem if my issue isnt stuttering?

4- Will this method you told me work on an overclocked monitor?

I am sorry I am asking too many auestions but I really don’t want to spend more money at this point..
 
stuttering isn't when it feels like 60fps, stuttering feels and looks like you are moving your mouse as smooth as possible left to right but it stutters as if your hand isn't steady.

Screen tearing is when you get a horizontal line across your screen that splits the image and shifts it so it's not lined up.

a game feeling like it's 60fps would mean that even though it's running at a high refresh rate, the whole thing feels like it's in motion at a slower frame rate or "sluggish" and not as fast and responsive as it should be.

You need to be connected to your monitor using a Display Port cable as that is what will give you G-Sync.

G-Sync is what fixes the screen tearing but without having to use V-Sync which locks your frame rate into place and in the case of frame rates higher than 60fps, it will lock the frame rate into the closest refresh rate increment that the monitor supports, if it's a 144Hz panel for example, and you are getting let's say 80fps, V-Sync will lock you in at 60Hz.

If you are getting 130fps, it will lock in at 120fps.

The problem with V-Sync though is that if you are getting more frames than what V-Sync locks you into, the way it works is that to keep you at 60fps and synchronize, it will force the GPU to wait before sending information to the monitor, and if the GPU is pre loading frames and is ready to send to the monitor at a time when the monitor isn't ready, it discards that frame, and then the monitor is ready but it's in the process of drawing a new frame, and this causes frame skips and frame dips.

Also, because it's telling the GPU to wait, you get an increase in input latency.

But with G-Sync, you don't have to lock yourself into any specific frame rate and the GPU doesn't have to wait for the monitor to say "let's go" instead, as long as the frame rate is below the limit of the monitor (in this case below 144fps) then the G-Sync module that is built into the monitor not only gives the monitor the ability, but forces it to adapt it's refresh rate to whatever the GPU is spitting out and synchronizes them so that you remove the screen tearing while also not introducing input latency and removing the effects of frame skips and dips.

As for stuttering, this can be caused by many different things, and what I told you to try doing to remedy it isn't a guarantee fix, it's just to make sure that none of those things is causing the stutters.

Some people also call frame skips and frame rate drops stuttering as well. But that is not a correct way to describe those issues.
 

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