Question Windows 10 Pc suddenly shuts off and turns back on by it's self... Im lost on what to do!

Jun 22, 2019
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I have been having a issue where my computer decides to turn off involuntary randomly. I have tried checking all plug-ins in the PC and wall, un-installed the ram and GPU and reinstalled, Reinstalled Graphic drivers and updated some cpu and smaller drivers. I stressed tested and seen that my CPU hit 96 C so i checked and changed my thermal paste but the random turn off still happens.
My specs are:
CPU: I7-7700k 4.2 Ghz
RAM: 16 GB G'Skill DDR4 2400
SSD: Samsung 860 Evo 256 GB x2
GPU: EVGA 1060 6Gb
Cooler is the Cooler master hyper 212 evo
PSU: KDM ATX 500W
Mobo: Asus tuff 2 series
 

AllanGH

Estimable
Mar 10, 2019
2,549
533
3,290
94
How old is that KDM PSU?

When they are new, they are a poor choice for a power supply.

Other than replacing that, I would look at possible sags and drop-outs in the power mains as a possible cause.

This all assumes that your thermals are normal.
 
Jun 22, 2019
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How old is that KDM PSU?

When they are new, they are a poor choice for a power supply.

Other than replacing that, I would look at possible sags and drop-outs in the power mains as a possible cause.

This all assumes that your thermals are normal.
It is a older power supply probably good 6+ years.
But what would be considered a sag and drop out?
 

AllanGH

Estimable
Mar 10, 2019
2,549
533
3,290
94
Yeah....I'd replace the power supply. Seriously.

A sag would be when the RMS voltage drops below the nominal mains voltage minus 5 or 10 percent.

A drop-out would be a short interval of a complete power mains cut....actually measured in milli-seconds. If you have incandescent lighting, you'd almost not notice it, but any SMPS would throw fits over it.

Both are best addressed by using a UPS between the mains connection point and the computer.
 
Jun 22, 2019
3
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Yeah....I'd replace the power supply. Seriously.

A sag would be when the RMS voltage drops below the nominal mains voltage minus 5 or 10 percent.

A drop-out would be a short interval of a complete power mains cut....actually measured in milli-seconds. If you have incandescent lighting, you'd almost not notice it, but any SMPS would throw fits over it.

Both are best addressed by using a UPS between the mains connection point and the computer.
Okay thank you for the information and help, I kept the idea that it could be bad in the back of my head but i took a multimeter to it and it outputted 12.63 V so i didn't suspect to much about it, But thank you again!
 

AllanGH

Estimable
Mar 10, 2019
2,549
533
3,290
94
At 6 years of age, that PSU could be a multiple output rail type; which means that measurements on one rail will not indicate the output on another rail, which is handled by a different regulator.

At 5.25% out of spec, on top of it being a 6 year-old low-quality PSU, I'd replace it without hesitation; because it's probably only a matter of time before it nukes itself. If you've been around computing equipment for any length of time, you know that could cost you the entire system.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1i6gYAlEEB8Wpbr4E3jY3ctuYvNR5SiuokzPLb5WiQlw/edit#gid=0

Look through "The List" and restrict your replacement PSU to a "Tier-1" or "Tier-2" unit....and I'd at least bump it up to a 550W output, just to establish a decent headroom on it.

As to the power mains, instead of going through the process of putting a "hit monitor" on the line and letting it run for a week, or so, I'd just assume that it's dirty and install a UPS anyway. Mine chirps a few times a day (indicating a negative power mains event), and I'm actually in an area that is considered good, in terms of power mains quality.
 

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