Question 500gb 1tb 2tb sata 2.5 hdd having best price durability ratio?

okppko

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About a 500gb, 1tb and 2tb hdd, for
each hdd size, is there a hdd you can recommend when looking at the
price durability ratio?
Thank you.
 

Eximo

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2.5" SSD, are quite inexpensive, no system will notice the difference, other than the improved performance. SSDs have no moving parts, so basically win any durability contest against hard drives. Also consume less power on average, since they don't have motors to spin up or armatures to move.

Basically only three hard drive manufacturers left. Just any 2.5" model really, all designed for use in laptops and will have drop and shock protection up the limits of the technology.

If I had to choose:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/hxBv6h/seagate-internal-hard-drive-st91000640ns

A little more expensive, but if you needed a thinner drive for whatever application:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/mjtQzy/western-digital-blue-mobile-1-tb-25-5400rpm-internal-hard-drive-wd10spzx

No 500GB worth it at the moment.

What I would likely actually buy:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/h3tQzy/crucial-mx500-1tb-25-solid-state-drive-ct1000mx500ssd1

That or a Samsung 500GB SSD.
 

okppko

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2.5" SSD, are quite inexpensive, no system will notice the difference, other than the improved performance. SSDs have no moving parts, so basically win any durability contest against hard drives. Also consume less power on average, since they don't have motors to spin up or armatures to move.
It has been debated the software running a ssd might be
able to compromise what other encryption is utilized to provide
file or system encryption on a ssd. Because I have heard no conclusive
answer about the matter, I rather get a hdd.
 

Eximo

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I'm not even sure what you are referring to there.

Same encryption would be used on either drive type. Would come from the onboard TPM of the computer, or software encryption from Windows or another OS.

If you mean to say that the firmware could be used to decrypt it, I can't think of a way that would be true. And if it works for SSDs, I can almost guarantee someone could make it work on a hard drive's firmware.
 

Eximo

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Looks like someone would have to physically steal your device to make this work, take the drive apart and wire up something to the circuit board. Beyond that, just choose an encryption method without this flaw, as mentioned.

"Bitlocker and other popular encryption tools can use software or hardware to encrypt and store the data encryption key, with many opting for the accelerated hardware encryption baked into many SSDs. This has turned out to be a bad idea, as tests on a variety of models show you can grab an encrypted disk, plug into the debug ports and convince it to accept any value as an authorized DEK and give you full access to the data on that drive. This is in part due to the hardware not using the owner's password for encryption … at all. The Register's article offers a suggestion, which is to make use of software encryption methods which do incorporate the users password and can be set to actually not use the same DEK across the entire drive. "
 

Bazzy 505

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About a 500gb, 1tb and 2tb hdd, for
each hdd size, is there a hdd you can recommend when looking at the
price durability ratio?
Thank you.
I would have to say Western Digital Gold (Formerly branded as Re).
The catch with these is that many sites resell OEM units as retail units. When you unlucky enough to be a victim of this,
WD will not honor warranty on OEM drives nor provide any support.

Now this being an Enterprise drives they come with a few advantages and some drawbacks.

Advantages:
fast, extremely durable ( very high write thru values and one the longest MTBF in the industry) robust drives with large cache

Disadvantage:
being enterprise drives, they're expensive, they're bit on the noisy side in operation and they run hotter than normal consumer drives.
(being mainly deployed in mid range rack mounted hardware, this is a design choice, noise doesn't matter and generally as for the temperatures,
recommended ambient termperature for hardware it's commonly used for is below 75F )

https://shop.westerndigital.com/products/internal-drives/wd-gold-sata-hdd#WD1005FBYZ
 

USAFRet

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It has been debated the software running a ssd might be
able to compromise what other encryption is utilized to provide
file or system encryption on a ssd. Because I have heard no conclusive
answer about the matter, I rather get a hdd.
That is not a function of being an SSD, but rather a poor implementation of full disk encryption.
Samsung/Crucial AND Microsoft dropped the ball on this.

MS will default to the drive encryption, even if you've wanted BitLocker.

Of course, any access for this needs physical access.

You can cause the drive to NOT use the Samsung/Crucial thing.
Or, you can use any other disk encryption you desire. VeraCrypt, for instance.
Or no FDE at all.

https://www.tomshardware.com/news/crucial-samsung-ssd-encryption-bypassed,38025.html
 

okppko

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I'm not even sure what you are referring to there.
I am not going to claim, I understand the matter fully. This
is my source
https://www.deutschlandfunk.de/verschluesselungssoftware-veracrypt-unabhaengige.684.de.html?dram:article_id=369309
My understanding is, a hdd is told by the system when to read and
write data. A hdd will not autonomously start altering and
optimizing the data. According to the article and a radio show
talking about the matter, ssds are different. The ssd
has build in software which can independently start moving
data and write it onto the ssd. If the data is decrypted
what can happen is the encryption software can
lose track of such data and get unable to encrypt or
shred the data.
The article mentions the manager of veracrypt. He says,
he is not going to utilize a ssd for anything involving
encryption. I cannot say, if the matter also applies
for usb memory sticks.
In order to get to know if a ssd can compromise
encrypted data as described, the ssd software would have
to be made public and get audited. But ssd manufactures
are not going to make the software in question
public.
When I got aware of this matter, I expected it would
get a big story. But it did not. When I mentioned
the matter here and there, then I got no response
or brushed of. No one made a technical convening
rebuff about the matter.
 

Eximo

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I suppose it comes down to your actual concerns.

Are you worried about lost data?
Are you worried about potential decryption of data on the drive itself? (In which case someone needs access to your system drive via a network)
Someone taking your drive and being able to decrypt the data? (At that point they have the whole laptop, so just defeating your login would be enough)

That article is brief on the subject, but it sounds like there is a potential for certain data to be shuffled around. However, that was written in 2016, hopefully your drive manufacturers have made improvements since then. If you want true security, Windows probably isn't ideal in the first place.

Maybe take a look at the Windows 11 Beta, they are requiring TPM.
 

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