[SOLVED] Advice on New build

Dudeman911

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Nov 28, 2010
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Hi Everyone, I would really appreciate a review and possible advice for a new build I'm working on:

Budget is $1500-$1700.

Processor -> AMD RYZEN 5 3600 6-Core 3.6 GHz (4.2 GHz Max Boost) Socket AM4 65W 100-100000031BOX Desktop Processor

Motherboard -> MSI MPG X570 GAMING EDGE WIFI Gaming Motherboard AMD AM4 SATA 6Gb/s M.2 USB 3.2 Gen 2 HDMI ATX

Video Card -> GIGABYTE GeForce RTX 2070 WINDFORCE 8G (Rev 3.0) Graphics Card, 2 x WINDFORCE Fans, 8GB 256-Bit GDDR6, GV-N2070WF2-8GD (Rev 3.0) Video Card

RAM -> CORSAIR Vengeance RGB Pro 32GB (2 x 16GB) 288-Pin DDR4 SDRAM DDR4 3200 (PC4 25600) Desktop Memory Model CMW32GX4M2C3200C16

Drive -> SAMSUNG 970 EVO PLUS 500GB Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) MZ-V7S500B/AM

Power Supply (hoping to re-use from the last time I built a machine) -> CORSAIR CMPSU-750TX 750W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS Certified Active PFC Compatible with Core i7 Power Supply

Case (hopeing to re-use from the last time I built a machine) -> AZZA Hurrican 2000 CSAZ-2000 Black SECC Japanese Steel ATX Full Tower Computer Case

OS -> Windows 10 Home - 64-bit - OEM

One question I have in particular is whether I should buy a different air cooler or use the stock one. The stock AMD coolers tend to be LOUD.

Thanks in advance!
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
If your TX power supply is more than five years old, or getting close to it, then I would advise you to consider replacement. It's warranty is five years, and that is the expectation of it's trouble free lifespan. Beyond that, no promises, and "no promises" includes the health of your new hardware. To me, it is a risk that simply is not worth it. Now, if it is less than three years old, then I wouldn't consider replacing it unless it is insufficient capacity or is having problems, and it's definitely not insufficient capacity.

Based on Corsair's memory finder compatibility utility, that memory kit is not compatible with that motherboard.

https://www.corsair.com/us/en/memoryfinder?type=motherboard


Besides which, at that speed, I'd be inclined to want to make every attempt to limit the population to two DIMMs. Otherwise you may not only run into issues with the IMC but also with even being able to run the memory at the advertised speed. You may have to reduce the speed with four DIMMs installed.

As far as the graphics card is concerned, my preference would always be to make every effort to stick to EVGA cards when going with an Nvidia based model. They are simply a superior product with a vastly superior after the sale customer service solution AND they offer an option for an extended warranty that is unmatched by any other card manufacturer.

https://www.evga.com/support/warranty/extended.asp
 

R_1

Glorious
Ambassador
the tx is a good PSU and should be fine.
the case should be fine too.

I suggest a different cooler. the little cooler that comes with the 3600 is small, it works but its small and not as efficient/quiet as the cheap 20 dollar Gammax 400 which I have on my 1500x, another 65W AMD CPU.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
If your TX power supply is more than five years old, or getting close to it, then I would advise you to consider replacement. It's warranty is five years, and that is the expectation of it's trouble free lifespan. Beyond that, no promises, and "no promises" includes the health of your new hardware. To me, it is a risk that simply is not worth it. Now, if it is less than three years old, then I wouldn't consider replacing it unless it is insufficient capacity or is having problems, and it's definitely not insufficient capacity.

Based on Corsair's memory finder compatibility utility, that memory kit is not compatible with that motherboard.

https://www.corsair.com/us/en/memoryfinder?type=motherboard


Besides which, at that speed, I'd be inclined to want to make every attempt to limit the population to two DIMMs. Otherwise you may not only run into issues with the IMC but also with even being able to run the memory at the advertised speed. You may have to reduce the speed with four DIMMs installed.

As far as the graphics card is concerned, my preference would always be to make every effort to stick to EVGA cards when going with an Nvidia based model. They are simply a superior product with a vastly superior after the sale customer service solution AND they offer an option for an extended warranty that is unmatched by any other card manufacturer.

https://www.evga.com/support/warranty/extended.asp
 

Dudeman911

Distinguished
Nov 28, 2010
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18,515
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If your TX power supply is more than five years old, or getting close to it, then I would advise you to consider replacement. It's warranty is five years, and that is the expectation of it's trouble free lifespan. Beyond that, no promises, and "no promises" includes the health of your new hardware. To me, it is a risk that simply is not worth it. Now, if it is less than three years old, then I wouldn't consider replacing it unless it is insufficient capacity or is having problems, and it's definitely not insufficient capacity.

Based on Corsair's memory finder compatibility utility, that memory kit is not compatible with that motherboard.

https://www.corsair.com/us/en/memoryfinder?type=motherboard


Besides which, at that speed, I'd be inclined to want to make every attempt to limit the population to two DIMMs. Otherwise you may not only run into issues with the IMC but also with even being able to run the memory at the advertised speed. You may have to reduce the speed with four DIMMs installed.

As far as the graphics card is concerned, my preference would always be to make every effort to stick to EVGA cards when going with an Nvidia based model. They are simply a superior product with a vastly superior after the sale customer service solution AND they offer an option for an extended warranty that is unmatched by any other card manufacturer.

https://www.evga.com/support/warranty/extended.asp
Thanks!

Ya, the power supply is 9 years old. Seems to be working fine though. :(

I haven't checked the motherboard RAM compatibility list, good call.
 

Dudeman911

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Nov 28, 2010
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crazy? not at all. overkill? a tad.
if you want to push the 3600 to the limits that is a good choice. at most speeds it will be almost passive, fans spinning at minimum.
Lol, okay, don't need overkill. :p

Is there a decent one in the $30-$40 range that you can think of?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
I can't find ANY specifications regarding the maximum CPU cooler height in order to verify that your case can even SUPPORT a large tower cooler. I don't see any reason to need a cooler of that capability however. This would be MORE than sufficient, and is a terrific cooler that far exceeds the needs of the CPU or the capabilities of the stock cooler. It's also about 7mm shorter than the Noctua NH-D15, so it will fit in a great many cases that the D15 will not.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU Cooler: Thermalright MACHO Rev.C 84.97 CFM CPU Cooler ($54.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $54.99
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-04 01:36 EST-0500
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Thanks!

Ya, the power supply is 9 years old. Seems to be working fine though. :(

I haven't checked the motherboard RAM compatibility list, good call.
There is ABSOLUTELY NO WAY you should use that PSU with this new system. None. If you use a 9 year old power supply that had a five year warranty with a brand new build, then don't be surprised or aggrieved when something goes wrong and one of your new components shats the bed. Being that the TX was fairly decent when new it might go out with a whimper, or it could just as easily go out with a "hey, watch THIS!!" if the protections fail because the components that make up the protections are no longer functional.
 
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R_1

Glorious
Ambassador
I suggest either the seasonic focus gold series of PSU
or the corsair RMx series by corsair.
I assume if you could afford 100 for a cooler these should be well in the price range, both have long warranties (10 years) and are much better than the TX you are replacing. 650W is more than enough for your system
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Even a 550w unit would be sufficient IF you bought a very high quality model. Considering the price difference probably isn't all that significant though, I'd likely opt for a 650w model which gives you a little breathing room in terms of fan operation/noise, longevity (Not running at or near capacity for long stretches), overclocking capability if you decide to or accomodation for voltage spikes, which definitely happen and also an allowance in case you decide to upgrade to a higher end CPU or graphics card at some point.

All of which assumes you DO replace the power supply. If you don't, well, I don't know what to really tell you other than I hope you have better luck than most of the other people I've seen in the past who've not opted to replace their power supplies when they were outside the warranty AND had just built new systems. You could be ok. You could be horribly NOT ok too. Not a risk I would take with my 1500-1700 dollar investment over an 80-100 dollar addition. At worst, you should replace the power supply, use the stock CPU cooler for now if you have to make a choice between the two of them and then replace the CPU cooler at a later date when it is fiscally more convenient for you to do so.
 

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