Question All devices disconnecting from ethernet switch

Mar 4, 2021
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About 8 months ago, I ran an ethernet cable from my router downstairs to my office upstairs to a TL-SG105 5-port ethernet switch. I then connected to it a desktop, a Lorex security cam system, and a TV receiver box (not sure exactly what to call it, the one that's not a DVR). Here's my current layout:



The problem is, whenever any device is powered ON, every device connected to the switch disconnects. The lights on all five channels, including the one that goes to the router, flash slowly, which I believe indicates reconnecting. They remain in this state for several minutes to several hours, it's pretty much a dice roll. The "solution" I have been using this whole time is, after I power on my computer in the morning, I remove the security cam ethernet cable from the switch. After doing that, everything else connects in a matter of seconds and remains solid for the rest of the day. That's great, but now the cam system is unusable, and if I have to turn off my computer again, it disconnects once I turn the computer back on and I have to wait x amount of minutes for it to connect. I know this sounds convoluted, because it is! And it's not always possible to reproduce this scenario, so trying to set up any sort of experiment or troubleshooting process for myself is a nightmare.

What are my solutions here? Is a switch the right way to go, or should I replace it with a second router? Is it something I can change in the router's control panel? Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks!
 
Mar 4, 2021
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It sounds like there's some sort if IP address conflict. How many dhcp servers are active on the network? That's where I would start.
Thanks for the reply. Honestly, I'm not exactly sure how to find that out. The only devices physically attached to the network are those in the picture in my post. There are three computers connected via wifi at various times during the day, as well as tablets and phones.

EDIT: Update, there is also a Wifi Range Extender, but as far as my limited knowledge is taking me, that shouldn't be acting as a DHCP server.
 
Last edited:

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Agree with @SamirD

What specific Lorex camera do you have?

I went to Lorex's website to look for the camera's default settings.

https://help.lorextechnology.com/link/portal/57356/57366/Article/1612/IP-Cameras-Default-username-and-password

If you delve in a bit deeper via the underlined blue links you find and learn quite a bit more about the camera and related configuration settings.

To find out more with respect to your system and network:

Run "ipconfig /all" (without quotes) via the Command Prompt on your desktop computer. Leave the security camera disconnected if necessary to run "ipconfig /all".

Also run "arp -a" via the Command Prompt.

Post the results of both commands. If possible try doing so when the security camera is connected.

Lastly, log into your router's admin pages. There should be a screen, diagram, or some sort of list showing devices that are connected and/or have been connected.

Try to capture and post that information as well.

Do not publish your public IP address:

Reference:

https://www.lifewire.com/what-is-a-public-ip-address-2625974#:~:text=Private vs Public IP Addresses: What's the Difference?&text=The router serves private IP,publicly connected to the internet.
 
Reactions: antilles311
Mar 4, 2021
5
0
10
0
Agree with @SamirD

What specific Lorex camera do you have?

I went to Lorex's website to look for the camera's default settings.

https://help.lorextechnology.com/link/portal/57356/57366/Article/1612/IP-Cameras-Default-username-and-password

If you delve in a bit deeper via the underlined blue links you find and learn quite a bit more about the camera and related configuration settings.

To find out more with respect to your system and network:

Run "ipconfig /all" (without quotes) via the Command Prompt on your desktop computer. Leave the security camera disconnected if necessary to run "ipconfig /all".

Also run "arp -a" via the Command Prompt.

Post the results of both commands. If possible try doing so when the security camera is connected.

Lastly, log into your router's admin pages. There should be a screen, diagram, or some sort of list showing devices that are connected and/or have been connected.

Try to capture and post that information as well.

Do not publish your public IP address:

Reference:

https://www.lifewire.com/what-is-a-public-ip-address-2625974#:~:text=Private vs Public IP Addresses: What's the Difference?&text=The router serves private IP,publicly connected to the internet.
Lorex Device Model: N861D6

For the following sections, I xx'd out the last three blocks of all the MAC addresses, the name of my work laptop, and the last digits of the Ring.

Windows IP Configuration

Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : DESKTOP-01H9QCC
Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :
Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
DNS Suffix Search List. . . . . . : home

Wireless LAN adapter Local Area Connection* 2:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft Wi-Fi Direct Virtual Adapter
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 34-F3-9A-xx-xx-xx
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Wireless LAN adapter Local Area Connection* 4:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft Wi-Fi Direct Virtual Adapter #2
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 36-F3-9A-xx-xx-xx
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Ethernet adapter Ethernet 2:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : TAP-Windows Adapter V9
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-FF-D6-xx-xx-xx
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Wireless LAN adapter Wi-Fi:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . : home
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel(R) Dual Band Wireless-AC 8260
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 34-F3-9A-xx-xx-xx
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::4d86:1f17:2946:25b3%11(Preferred)
IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.254.28(Preferred)
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Friday, March 5, 2021 10:03:22 AM
Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Friday, March 5, 2021 2:03:22 PM
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.254.254
DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.254.254
DHCPv6 IAID . . . . . . . . . . . : 53801882
DHCPv6 Client DUID. . . . . . . . : 00-01-00-01-20-36-D4-7A-34-F3-9A-26-72-30
DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.254.254
NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

Ethernet adapter Bluetooth Network Connection:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Bluetooth Device (Personal Area Network)
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 34-F3-9A-xx-xx-xx
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Interface: 192.168.254.28 --- 0xb
Internet Address Physical Address Type
192.168.254.11 3c-36-e4-xx-xx-xx dynamic
192.168.254.15 1c-1b-68-xx-xx-xx dynamic
192.168.254.16 c2-41-1e-xx-xx-xx dynamic
192.168.254.20 40-a2-db-xx-xx-xx dynamic
192.168.254.30 d8-9d-67-xx-xx-xx dynamic
192.168.254.48 44-cb-8b-xx-xx-xx dynamic
192.168.254.82 00-1f-54-xx-xx-xx dynamic
192.168.254.84 b4-b6-86-xx-xx-xx dynamic
192.168.254.118 c2-41-1e-xx-xx-xx dynamic
192.168.254.254 4c-12-65-xx-xx-xx dynamic
192.168.254.255 ff-ff-ff-ff-ff-ff static
224.0.0.22 01-00-5e-00-00-16 static
224.0.0.251 01-00-5e-00-00-fb static
224.0.0.252 01-00-5e-00-00-fc static
239.255.255.250 01-00-5e-7f-ff-fa static
255.255.255.255 ff-ff-ff-ff-ff-ff static


N861D6 <-- This is the Lorex camera system
00:1f:54:xx:xx:xx
Ethernet Port 4 - 1000 Mbps Full
192.168.254.82 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

BRW0C96E6C17DD6
0c:96:e6:xx:xx:xx
Wireless SSID: 2.4 GHz:
192.168.254.16 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

Master-Bedroom
1c:1b:68:xx:xx:xx
MoCA Coax
192.168.254.15 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

host-17
1c:7b:23:xx:xx:xx
Wireless SSID: 5 GHz:Frontier6944_5G
192.168.254.24 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

DESKTOP-01H9QCC
34:f3:9a:xx:xx:xx
Wireless SSID: 5 GHz:Frontier6944_5G
192.168.254.28 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

Living-Room
3c:36:e4:xx:xx:xx
MoCA Coax
192.168.254.11 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

amazon-252521584
40:a2:db:xx:xx:xx
Wireless SSID: 5 GHz:Frontier6944_5G
192.168.254.20 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

iPhone-43
42:b3:11:xx:xx:xx
Wireless SSID: 5 GHz:Frontier6944_5G
192.168.254.107 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

LGwebOSTV
44:cb:8b:xx:xx:xx
Wireless SSID: 5 GHz:Frontier6944_5G
192.168.254.48 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

XboxOne
4c:0b:be:xx:xx:xx
Wireless SSID: 5 GHz:Frontier6944_5G
192.168.254.27 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

unknown
58:2f:40:xx:xx:xx
Wireless SSID: 5 GHz:Frontier6944_5G
192.168.254.31 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

ChimePro-d2
74:e1:82:xx:xx:xx
Wireless SSID: 2.4 GHz:Frontier6944
192.168.254.46 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

DESKTOP-FK0ACFO-31
a4:17:31:xx:xx:xx
Wireless SSID: 2.4 GHz:Frontier6944
192.168.254.89 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

Edgars-iPad-40
b2:54:eb:xx:xx:xx
Wireless SSID: 5 GHz:Frontier6944_5G
192.168.254.102 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

xxxxxx (work laptop asset tag, don't feel comfortable sharing that)
b4:b6:86:xx:xx:xx
Ethernet Port 4 - 1000 Mbps Full
192.168.254.84 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

RE9000
c4:41:1e:xx:xx:xx
Wireless SSID: 2.4 GHz:
192.168.254.118 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

HPE013BE
d8:9d:67:xx:xx:xx
Wireless SSID: 2.4 GHz:Frontier6944
192.168.254.30 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

IPC365
e0:09:bf:xx:xx:xx
Wireless SSID: 2.4 GHz:Frontier6944
192.168.254.113 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

Ring-xxxxxx
f8:36:9b:xx:xx:xx
Wireless SSID: 2.4 GHz:Frontier6944
192.168.254.26 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

amazon-e192f4bf9
fc:a1:83:5d:xx:xx:xx
Wireless SSID: 5 GHz:Frontier6944_5G
192.168.254.21 DHCP
LAN: Private Status: Active

Thanks for the reply!
 
Last edited:

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
First of all, no problems with you hiding/masking MACs or the work laptop info.

Did you set the router (Default Gateway) to be 192.168.254.254?

Your diagram shows the Desktop as a wired connection. "ipconfig /all" indicates wireless.

How many cameras? And the camera's all communicate wirelessly to the "Lorex Camera System" plugged into LAN Port 4 of the Ethernet switch - correct?

According to the router's control panel list there are almost 20 devices on your network.

For your use, expand your diagram to show all devices including device name, MAC, IP address (DHCP or Static), subnet mask, and where applicable the physical LAN Port being used.

Again watch for duplicates of any sort (IP address, MAC,) or errors. Look for any physical connection loops (wired connections that form a loop. Especially any loop involving the security camera system.

What router port is the switch using?

I noted two devices (via the router control panel list) as using Ethernet Port 4 indicating wired connectivity.

The first being the Lorex Camera System, the second being the work laptop.

FYI:

https://www.lorextechnology.com/self-serve/remote-access-troubleshooting-guide/R-sc6100032#:~:text=If connecting using client software,is not connected to router.

Once you can fill in the full network map and also match devices, IPs, MACs to Devices you may discover what has gone astray.

The biggest clue, in my mind is the dependence on the security camera system being connected or disconnected.
 
Reactions: antilles311
Mar 4, 2021
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First of all, no problems with you hiding/masking MACs or the work laptop info.

Did you set the router (Default Gateway) to be 192.168.254.254?
No. Up until yesterday, the home-owner was the only one with the password for the router control panel until he handed it over to me. However, he plays life safe and doesn't change any settings with anything technical, so I'm assuming it was set to that by default. On a side note, I realized that .254.254 is the complement of .1.1, and this is the first home network I've ever used that doesn't use .1.1.

Your diagram shows the Desktop as a wired connection. "ipconfig /all" indicates wireless.
Ah, I should have specified. The two "DESKTOPs" listed are other desktops in the house that indeed use Wi-Fi. The desktop I referred to in the diagram is actually a computer I have next to my work laptop. I often switch the ethernet cable from my work computer to that desktop when I'm finished with work. I thought this might be an issue, but those two computers are assigned different IPs so I'm not so sure. And from what I remember, I was having this problem before I even owned that desktop, when I had the ethernet cable connected to my laptop constantly.

How many cameras? And the camera's all communicate wirelessly to the "Lorex Camera System" plugged into LAN Port 4 of the Ethernet switch - correct?
There are six cameras, all of which are wired to box which a) displays the camera footage on a TV and b) connects to the network via port 2 of the switch (which indeed is connected to router port 4).

According to the router's control panel list there are almost 20 devices on your network.

For your use, expand your diagram to show all devices including device name, MAC, IP address (DHCP or Static), subnet mask, and where applicable the physical LAN Port being used.

Again watch for duplicates of any sort (IP address, MAC,) or errors. Look for any physical connection loops (wired connections that form a loop. Especially any loop involving the security camera system.
I'll check this out when I get out of work, which should hopefully be within the next two hours. If I've supplied enough info in this post to where you might be able to provide more information in the mean-time, that would be appreciated, but if not, I completely understand.

What router port is the switch using?
Router port 4.

I noted two devices (via the router control panel list) as using Ethernet Port 4 indicating wired connectivity.
Both of these devices are connected to the switch, which is indeed connected to Ethernet Port 4 on the router. The first is the Lorex box, the second being the work laptop.

FYI:

https://www.lorextechnology.com/self-serve/remote-access-troubleshooting-guide/R-sc6100032#:~:text=If connecting using client software,is not connected to router.

Once you can fill in the full network map and also match devices, IPs, MACs to Devices you may discover what has gone astray.

The biggest clue, in my mind is the dependence on the security camera system being connected or disconnected.
I don't think this is what you are suggesting, but I would like to note that the camera box displays the footage on the TV whether or not it's connected to the network. The reason we have it connected to the network is so the home-owner can view the footage on the fly on his computer and receive alerts (via an app on his phone) when an object passes the camera close by.

Thanks for the thorough questions and suggestions, hopefully this is enough information for anyone reading this to work with!
 
Mar 4, 2021
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Okay so I made a list of all my devices, their IPs, MAC's, etc, including recent inactive devices. No duplicate IPs and no duplicate MACs whatsoever. I checked the back of the Lorex box. Six ethernet cables out to the cameras themselves, an HDMI cable to the TV, and an ethernet cable to the switch.

I tried another approach, and checked the cables connected to the switch, making note of the gauge and type.

Switch [5] to Router [4]: 23AWG Cat6A
Switch [1] to Work Laptop: 23AWG Cat6A
Switch [2] to Lorex Box: 24AWG Cat5E

The odd one out is the cable to the Lorex Box. I did some research and found out that Cat5E and Cat6A can both handle 1000 Mbps, which is the speed of Router port 4; so I don't think the fact that it is Cat5E is the cause of this mess, but I found it interesting nonetheless.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Try replacing the "odd one out" Ethernet cable with known working at a speed cable.

Likewise try replacing other Ethernet cables (one at a time) with known working at speed cables.

There are, as I often read as of late, lots of bad/substandard Ethernet cables.

What was the source of those Cat6A cables? Likewise for the Cat5E cables...

Are you sure that none of the physical connections within the network form a loop?

On the router: What is the allowed DHCP IP address range? Are there any limits on the number of connected devices.

Are all static IPs' outside of the allowed DHCP IP address range and reserved for a specific static IP via the devices MAC?
 

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