[SOLVED] CPU Temp vs Core Temp

Aug 25, 2019
7
0
10
0
So im really getting worried about my PC its core says to be hitting about 102°C and my CPU temp still stays at 60°C when i undo the heatsink to check what's with CPU it wasn't that hot as reported by Core temp so the thing is im.not really getting why core temp is giving so diff value than CPU temp and i tested it during 100% load and i reapplied the paste and applied pea size only after that i have checked the CPU fan running fine at 2.5K Rpm and is it normal for a cpu core to hit 102 or is it just way too hot and what should i do for fixing
Here is my spec
I3 2120(Stock cooler, no OC)
6GB DDR3
1TB HDD
GT 1030 (Not OC either)
and no chassis fan i poor XD
so pls help
 
Last edited:

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
"Contamination" is definitely not the problem. Further, using different thermal compounds does not make that much difference (only a few °C). It's completely possible that each time you installed the stock cooler, the same mistake was repeatedly made in not getting the push pins completely seated and properly latched. It's happened to all of us. It's also possible that there's a damaged push-pin which has gone unnoticed.

As both geofelt and I have provided detailed instructions, if you still can't succeed in getting the stock cooler properly and securely installed, then you will need to replace the cooler. Also, if the push-pins have stretched over the years, which is highly likely, then you will still need to replace the cooler.

Aftermarket coolers that have a backplate with proper fastening hardware are highly preferred over any push-pin coolers. However, keep in mind that if the motherboard tray in your case does not have a cutout that allows access to the back of the CPU socket, then the motherboard must be removed to install a backplate.

If you're comfortable with removing and reinstalling the motherboard, then an aftermarket cooler with a backplate is your best solution, such as the Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO. If you're not OK with removing the motherboard, then a new aftermarket push-pin cooler is your only option, such as the DeepCool Gammaxx 400.

Nonetheless, if you decide to purchase a push-pin cooler, then you will still be faced with dealing with push-pins.

CT :sol:
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
ArmanSK69,

Your i3-2120 is reaching "Throttle" temperature which is too hot.

Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.



What is your ambient (room) temperature?

From where are you reading "CPU" temperature?

Regardless of whether you're reading CPU temperature from BIOS or any one of a number of assorted software utilities, the Cores are the heat sources, which is where your focus needs to be.

Intel Desktop processors have temperatures for each "Core" and a temperature for the entire "CPU". Core temperatures are measured at the heat sources near the transistor "Junctions" inside each Core where temperatures are highest. CPU temperature is instead a single measurement centered on the external surface of the CPU's "Case" or "IHS" (Integrated Heat Spreader) where the cooler is seated.

Core temperature is considerably higher than CPU temperature due to differences in the proximity of sensors to heat sources.

Checking thermal performance by touch is like feeling a fireplace from 3 meters. Since hundreds of millions of nanometer scale transistors are densely packaged into a tiny Die, heat dissipates over relatively large areas and thermal gradients to the cooler, about 3 millimeters from the Cores. (3 millimeters = 3,000,000 nanometers).

Although some heat dissipates to the substrate, socket and motherboard, most heat dissipates to the cooler through several thermal gradients; Cores > Die > internal TIM (or solder) > IHS > external TIM > cooler. Even at 100% workload nothing will feel hot; exhaust airflow, heat pipes, cooling fins, radiator or water block will feel warm, and liquid cooling tubes will have a moderate temperature differential.

When any Intel processor with a stock cooler reaches Throttle temperature, the first and most suspected item is always the cooler.

It's very likely that your stock cooler has popped a push-pin loose from the motherboard, which is a very common problem. This causes poor contact pressure between the cooler and the CPU, resulting in high temperatures in BIOS, as well as in Windows at idle, and especially at 100% workload.

You can troubleshoot this problem by pushing firmly on each corner of the cooler for about 30 seconds while watching your load temperatures. When you see a significant drop, you've found the loose push-pin.

Although the push-pins appear to be a simple little no-brainer mechanism. they can be deceivingly tricky to get them fully inserted through the motherboard and properly latched. This is a problem that's tripped up the best and most experienced of us, so don't feel bad; you're in good company.

(1) To re-seat a single loose push-pin, rotate the latch mechanism in the direction of the arrow counterclockwise 90° then retract the pin by pulling upward. Rotate the latch clockwise 90° to reset the pin, but do NOT push on the latch yet.

(2) To get the pin fully inserted through the motherboard, push only on the leg, NOT on the top of the latch.

(3) While holding the leg firmly against the motherboard with one hand, you can now push on the top of the latch with your other hand until the latch clicks.

(4) If you're re-seating the entire cooler, then be sure to latch the pins across from one another, rather than next to one another. Use an "X" pattern, so as to apply even pressure during installation.

Here's a brief video ...

Intel Stock Cooler Installation -
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qczGR4KMnY

Keep in mind that the push-pins will stretch over time, so contact pressure slowly degrades to the point where reseating the cooler is no longer an effective means to correct high Core temperatures. In this event, the only solution is to replace the cooler.

Aftermarket coolers that have a backplate with proper fastening hardware are highly preferred over any push-pin coolers.

CT :sol:
 
Aug 25, 2019
7
0
10
0
ArmanSK69,

Your i3-2120 is reaching "Throttle" temperature which is too hot.

Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.



What is your ambient (room) temperature?

From where are you reading "CPU" temperature?

Regardless of whether you're reading CPU temperature from BIOS or any one of a number of assorted software utilities, the Cores are the heat sources, which is where your focus needs to be.

Intel Desktop processors have temperatures for each "Core" and a temperature for the entire "CPU". Core temperatures are measured at the heat sources near the transistor "Junctions" inside each Core where temperatures are highest. CPU temperature is instead a single measurement centered on the external surface of the CPU's "Case" or "IHS" (Integrated Heat Spreader) where the cooler is seated.

Core temperature is considerably higher than CPU temperature due to differences in the proximity of sensors to heat sources.

Checking thermal performance by touch is like feeling a fireplace from 3 meters. Since hundreds of millions of nanometer scale transistors are densely packaged into a tiny Die, heat dissipates over relatively large areas and thermal gradients to the cooler, about 3 millimeters from the Cores. (3 millimeters = 3,000,000 nanometers).

Although some heat dissipates to the substrate, socket and motherboard, most heat dissipates to the cooler through several thermal gradients; Cores > Die > internal TIM (or solder) > IHS > external TIM > cooler. Even at 100% workload nothing will feel hot; exhaust airflow, heat pipes, cooling fins, radiator or water block will feel warm, and liquid cooling tubes will have a moderate temperature differential.

When any Intel processor with a stock cooler reaches Throttle temperature, the first and most suspected item is always the cooler.

It's very likely that your stock cooler has popped a push-pin loose from the motherboard, which is a very common problem. This causes poor contact pressure between the cooler and the CPU, resulting in high temperatures in BIOS, as well as in Windows at idle, and especially at 100% workload.

You can troubleshoot this problem by pushing firmly on each corner of the cooler for about 30 seconds while watching your load temperatures. When you see a significant drop, you've found the loose push-pin.

Although the push-pins appear to be a simple little no-brainer mechanism. they can be deceivingly tricky to get them fully inserted through the motherboard and properly latched. This is a problem that's tripped up the best and most experienced of us, so don't feel bad; you're in good company.

(1) To re-seat a single loose push-pin, rotate the latch mechanism in the direction of the arrow counterclockwise 90° then retract the pin by pulling upward. Rotate the latch clockwise 90° to reset the pin, but do NOT push on the latch yet.

(2) To get the pin fully inserted through the motherboard, push only on the leg, NOT on the top of the latch.

(3) While holding the leg firmly against the motherboard with one hand, you can now push on the top of the latch with your other hand until the latch clicks.

(4) If you're re-seating the entire cooler, then be sure to latch the pins across from one another, rather than next to one another. Use an "X" pattern, so as to apply even pressure during installation.

Here's a brief video ...

Intel Stock Cooler Installation -
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qczGR4KMnY

Keep in mind that the push-pins will stretch over time, so contact pressure slowly degrades to the point where reseating the cooler is no longer an effective means to correct high Core temperatures. In this event, the only solution is to replace the cooler.

Aftermarket coolers that have a backplate with proper fastening hardware are highly preferred over any push-pin coolers.

CT :sol:
Thanks a lot for this sir but i might be ignoring this problem for about a week so is there any harm if i do trying it fix rn?
 
Aug 25, 2019
7
0
10
0
ArmanSK69,

Your i3-2120 is reaching "Throttle" temperature which is too hot.

Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.



What is your ambient (room) temperature?

From where are you reading "CPU" temperature?

Regardless of whether you're reading CPU temperature from BIOS or any one of a number of assorted software utilities, the Cores are the heat sources, which is where your focus needs to be.

Intel Desktop processors have temperatures for each "Core" and a temperature for the entire "CPU". Core temperatures are measured at the heat sources near the transistor "Junctions" inside each Core where temperatures are highest. CPU temperature is instead a single measurement centered on the external surface of the CPU's "Case" or "IHS" (Integrated Heat Spreader) where the cooler is seated.

Core temperature is considerably higher than CPU temperature due to differences in the proximity of sensors to heat sources.

Checking thermal performance by touch is like feeling a fireplace from 3 meters. Since hundreds of millions of nanometer scale transistors are densely packaged into a tiny Die, heat dissipates over relatively large areas and thermal gradients to the cooler, about 3 millimeters from the Cores. (3 millimeters = 3,000,000 nanometers).

Although some heat dissipates to the substrate, socket and motherboard, most heat dissipates to the cooler through several thermal gradients; Cores > Die > internal TIM (or solder) > IHS > external TIM > cooler. Even at 100% workload nothing will feel hot; exhaust airflow, heat pipes, cooling fins, radiator or water block will feel warm, and liquid cooling tubes will have a moderate temperature differential.

When any Intel processor with a stock cooler reaches Throttle temperature, the first and most suspected item is always the cooler.

It's very likely that your stock cooler has popped a push-pin loose from the motherboard, which is a very common problem. This causes poor contact pressure between the cooler and the CPU, resulting in high temperatures in BIOS, as well as in Windows at idle, and especially at 100% workload.

You can troubleshoot this problem by pushing firmly on each corner of the cooler for about 30 seconds while watching your load temperatures. When you see a significant drop, you've found the loose push-pin.

Although the push-pins appear to be a simple little no-brainer mechanism. they can be deceivingly tricky to get them fully inserted through the motherboard and properly latched. This is a problem that's tripped up the best and most experienced of us, so don't feel bad; you're in good company.

(1) To re-seat a single loose push-pin, rotate the latch mechanism in the direction of the arrow counterclockwise 90° then retract the pin by pulling upward. Rotate the latch clockwise 90° to reset the pin, but do NOT push on the latch yet.

(2) To get the pin fully inserted through the motherboard, push only on the leg, NOT on the top of the latch.

(3) While holding the leg firmly against the motherboard with one hand, you can now push on the top of the latch with your other hand until the latch clicks.

(4) If you're re-seating the entire cooler, then be sure to latch the pins across from one another, rather than next to one another. Use an "X" pattern, so as to apply even pressure during installation.

Here's a brief video ...

Intel Stock Cooler Installation -
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qczGR4KMnY

Keep in mind that the push-pins will stretch over time, so contact pressure slowly degrades to the point where reseating the cooler is no longer an effective means to correct high Core temperatures. In this event, the only solution is to replace the cooler.

Aftermarket coolers that have a backplate with proper fastening hardware are highly preferred over any push-pin coolers.

CT :sol:
I Tried everything u said and i there is still jumps when at ideal my cores rests at 40°C and when 100% load it just jumps upto 100°C so something is still wrong is it the contamination of TIM or Quality of it i bought it from near store and got really cheap and i was too suspecting it's quality so what could be the matter?
 
Sounds to me like your cpu cooler has become dislodged and is not cooling properly.
If you have undone the cooler, you need to remount it properly, using new paste.

----------------how to mount the stock Intel cooler--------------

The stock Intel cooler can be tricky to install.
A poor installation will result in higher cpu temperatures.
If properly mounted, you should expect temperatures at idle to be 10-15c. over ambient.

To mount the Intel stock cooler properly, place the motherboard on top of the foam or cardboard backing that was packed with the motherboard.
The stock cooler will come with paste pre applied, it looks like three grey strips.
The 4 push pins should come in the proper position for installation, that is with the pins rotated in the opposite direction of the arrow,(clockwise)
and pulled up as far as they can go.
Take the time to play with the pushpin mechanism until you know how they work.

Orient the 4 pins so that they are exactly over the motherboard holes.
If one is out of place, you will damage the pins which are delicate.
Push down on a DIAGONAL pair of pins at the same time. Then the other pair.

When you push down on the top black pins, it expands the white plastic pins to fix the cooler in place.

If you do them one at a time, you will not get the cooler on straight.
Lastly, look at the back of the motherboard to verify that all 4 pins are equally through the motherboard, and that the cooler is on firmly.
This last step must be done, which is why the motherboard should be out of the case to do the job. Or you need a case with a opening that lets you see the pins.
It is possible to mount the cooler with the motherboard mounted in the case, but you can then never be certain that the push pins are inserted properly
unless you can verify that the pins are through the motherboard and locked.

If you should need to remove the cooler, turn the pins counter clockwise to unlock them.
You will need to clean off the old paste and reapply new if you ever take the cooler off.
Clean off old paste with alcohol and a lint free paper like a coffee filter.
Apply new paste sparingly. A small rice sized drop in the center will spread our under heat and pressure.
Too much paste is bad, it will act as an insulator.
It is hard to use too little.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Any cooler needs a good source of fresh air to do it's job.
What is the make/model of your case?
If it does not have any fan at all, you have a problem.
You can take the case covers off and that will help.
(not so good if you have cats or kids around)
 
Aug 25, 2019
7
0
10
0
Sounds to me like your cpu cooler has become dislodged and is not cooling properly.
If you have undone the cooler, you need to remount it properly, using new paste.

----------------how to mount the stock Intel cooler--------------

The stock Intel cooler can be tricky to install.
A poor installation will result in higher cpu temperatures.
If properly mounted, you should expect temperatures at idle to be 10-15c. over ambient.

To mount the Intel stock cooler properly, place the motherboard on top of the foam or cardboard backing that was packed with the motherboard.
The stock cooler will come with paste pre applied, it looks like three grey strips.
The 4 push pins should come in the proper position for installation, that is with the pins rotated in the opposite direction of the arrow,(clockwise)
and pulled up as far as they can go.
Take the time to play with the pushpin mechanism until you know how they work.

Orient the 4 pins so that they are exactly over the motherboard holes.
If one is out of place, you will damage the pins which are delicate.
Push down on a DIAGONAL pair of pins at the same time. Then the other pair.

When you push down on the top black pins, it expands the white plastic pins to fix the cooler in place.

If you do them one at a time, you will not get the cooler on straight.
Lastly, look at the back of the motherboard to verify that all 4 pins are equally through the motherboard, and that the cooler is on firmly.
This last step must be done, which is why the motherboard should be out of the case to do the job. Or you need a case with a opening that lets you see the pins.
It is possible to mount the cooler with the motherboard mounted in the case, but you can then never be certain that the push pins are inserted properly
unless you can verify that the pins are through the motherboard and locked.

If you should need to remove the cooler, turn the pins counter clockwise to unlock them.
You will need to clean off the old paste and reapply new if you ever take the cooler off.
Clean off old paste with alcohol and a lint free paper like a coffee filter.
Apply new paste sparingly. A small rice sized drop in the center will spread our under heat and pressure.
Too much paste is bad, it will act as an insulator.
It is hard to use too little.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Any cooler needs a good source of fresh air to do it's job.
What is the make/model of your case?
If it does not have any fan at all, you have a problem.
You can take the case covers off and that will help.
(not so good if you have cats or kids around)
Thanks a lot i ordered some case fans and Branded Thermal paste by Cooler Master and i think there must be contamination in my i3 i installed another CPU that is Pentium G2010 to see is there anything wrong with my CPU it was 0.5 GHz slower and had only 2 Cores and 2 threads and was taking 0.3 V less than my I3 so it was obvious it won't heat much but still reached 79°C which was a bit hot for that small CPU and there wasn't any Dust in it so it was pretty clean so i was sure there wasn't anything wrong with my I3 and then i reinstalled i3 to see what happens and was still giving same results so i thought there can be some contamination in my i3 coz i had applied and removed thermal paste quite a times within this week and wasn't cleaning with Alcohol so might be left with DUST and the Thermal paste i bought was also very very cheap and i suspected the quality and was giving a lot of oil when kept on paper yet i applied it coz im a nub pls don't kill me XD, so i think this time its going to give me good results i haven't bought CPU cooler in thought that if this items fix my problem so it would be just waste of money.
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
"Contamination" is definitely not the problem. Further, using different thermal compounds does not make that much difference (only a few °C). It's completely possible that each time you installed the stock cooler, the same mistake was repeatedly made in not getting the push pins completely seated and properly latched. It's happened to all of us. It's also possible that there's a damaged push-pin which has gone unnoticed.

As both geofelt and I have provided detailed instructions, if you still can't succeed in getting the stock cooler properly and securely installed, then you will need to replace the cooler. Also, if the push-pins have stretched over the years, which is highly likely, then you will still need to replace the cooler.

Aftermarket coolers that have a backplate with proper fastening hardware are highly preferred over any push-pin coolers. However, keep in mind that if the motherboard tray in your case does not have a cutout that allows access to the back of the CPU socket, then the motherboard must be removed to install a backplate.

If you're comfortable with removing and reinstalling the motherboard, then an aftermarket cooler with a backplate is your best solution, such as the Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO. If you're not OK with removing the motherboard, then a new aftermarket push-pin cooler is your only option, such as the DeepCool Gammaxx 400.

Nonetheless, if you decide to purchase a push-pin cooler, then you will still be faced with dealing with push-pins.

CT :sol:
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY