Question How bad 5.0GHz is penetrating drywall?

Jul 8, 2019
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Hello guys.
I need to buy some sort of antenna to recieve signal in a building that is 30mts or less away from the router. I want to buy the CPE610 from TP-LINK which is 23dbi, but the problem is a very thin transparent plastic roof and a thin drywall sheet, nothing else. My phone actually does recieve a very liiiiitle info in the 5.0GHz signal... I was hoping 23dbi would do the job, what do you guys think? Or you definitely recommend to go for 2.4GHz? Thanks in advance.
 

AllanGH

Commendable
Mar 10, 2019
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Unless the drywall is foil-backed, or you have metal objects between you and the WiFi router/AP, you should be fine with signal reception. Another consideration would be if you are launching a signal through an exterior stucco wall. In such a case, you would have metal stucco mesh and foil insulation backing to contend with.

It's always best to elevate both the transmitting and receiving antennas as much as is practically possible.

But, yes, going with 2.4GHz will give you about 3 times the reach you'll get out of 5GHz.
 
Jul 8, 2019
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Unless the drywall is foil-backed, or you have metal objects between you and the WiFi router/AP, you should be fine with signal reception. Another consideration would be if you are launching a signal through an exterior stucco wall. In such a case, you would have metal stucco mesh and foil insulation backing to contend with.

It's always best to elevate both the transmitting and receiving antennas as much as is practically possible.

But, yes, going with 2.4GHz will give you about 3 times the reach you'll get out of 5GHz.
Thanks for your letting this clear. I've found the CPE210 which is 2.4GHz but is just 9dbi... Some device you can suggest that actually have stronger antennas or at least omnidirectional? Thank you buddy.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
If the building has power, then put a directional unit outdoors and bring the network inside on an ethernet cable. The 23dB antenna is almost $100. You can buy an outdoor directional dual band WIFI bridge and bring either 2.4 or 5Ghz in on the ethernet cable. Then add a WIFI access point or old router if you want interior WIFI.
 
I would agree with the recommendation to use a outdoor link and bring the signal in via ethernet. What will and will not block wifi is almost impossible to predict. Where I used to work they put some energy saving film on all the windows. As soon as they did that we had complaint from people that none of the building AP were detectable outside. You could look in from outside through the new film and actually see the AP on the ceiling but got no signal. Management decided that it was a good thing.

Your microwave oven puts out 1000 times the power of a router on the same 2.4g frequencies. The coating on the glass absorbs massive amounts of energy, the legal allowable signal leakage is far below what any network equipment puts out.

In general you will not be able to punch a signal though something that is absorbing it. You would need something on both sides to push the signal through even if you could.
 
Jul 8, 2019
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I would agree with the recommendation to use a outdoor link and bring the signal in via ethernet. What will and will not block wifi is almost impossible to predict. Where I used to work they put some energy saving film on all the windows. As soon as they did that we had complaint from people that none of the building AP were detectable outside. You could look in from outside through the new film and actually see the AP on the ceiling but got no signal. Management decided that it was a good thing.

Your microwave oven puts out 1000 times the power of a router on the same 2.4g frequencies. The coating on the glass absorbs massive amounts of energy, the legal allowable signal leakage is far below what any network equipment puts out.

In general you will not be able to punch a signal though something that is absorbing it. You would need something on both sides to push the signal through even if you could.
This is a very interesting point... That's is why Im thinking about using the CPE210, it's 2.4GHz but what Im caring about is that it's just 9dbi antennas... It would do the job getting through the little obstacle I have, but it is the same problem... A lot, I mean, a lot of devices around, including the neighboors microwaves... So Im not pretty sure what would be the best outdoor solution for me :( Anything better than the CPE210 you can sugest? Thanks.
 
I have not used that product but it appears similar to the ones from ubiquiti. I have used the older nanostation loco devices. The still sell a 2.4g model but most are 5g so they can use 802.11ac for more speed.

You want one of these on both ends of the connection. These are directional devices so that helps reduce the interference from neighbors. Obviously it won't work for many reasons if you attempted to send the signal beam though your neighbors house and his wifi equipment.

The good companies actually show the antenna beam pattern but in general the ones designed to go longer distances have a narrower beam since they are concentrating the power more. All the units still have the same legal maximum transmit power they just concentrate the signal more.

The actual gain of the antenna does not mean a lot at this distance you are talking. These devices are designed to go many kilometers.
 

avatar_of_tenebrae

Prominent
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Oct 25, 2017
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please clarify your cost difference, speed difference, and impact portfolio

i mean are we debating cream cheese versus cheese whiz or versa versus ferrari?

making a hole in drywall isn't that hard. really.

buy it return in 30 days if it doesn't work.

basically there are antenna "boosters" and some of them are fakes, there are repeaters (the expensive whole building/office grade ones work and are illegal for consumers to operate without a license)

you have any square metal tubing to penetrate the roof with?
 

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