VeriX_

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Quick question, quick answers (preferably) guys.

How would you go about removing this:

PIC - it’s not mine but it shows what happened pretty well

View: https://imgur.com/a/EZNnmPg


Some BACKSTORY for a better idea of why and what the goal for this is - so, for a while I’ve been trying to come up with what really is wrong with the PC currently being used by me (you can read about it for some more info, I believe in my previous posts). For troubleshooting the not working PC, I’d use my previous motherboard shown above (temporary pic), does that make any sense? (I’m pretty sure that despite the melted plastic, the motherboard is in a good working condition - last time it did boot before replacing it showed an anti surge protection screen).

Thanks in advance.
 

BogdanH

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I don't recommend "cleaning" only. At full load, there can be up to about 8A current on each of these two (10 & 11) pins and if contact is not perfect, it will melt again.
If that would happen to me and motherboard would be of high value for me, then I would try to replace whole ATX power slot (plastic housing is quite damaged from what I can see). It can be done with enough patience and if you have experience with soldering.. many times more important: experience with un-soldering (removing tin without overheating motherboard contacts).
Maybe someone else will come will come with better solution.
 

Eximo

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Not clear what you want to remove? Is your ATX connector melted in?

Or do you want to replace the pins? Google pin removal tool, should be all you need there. You can also order new molex pins.

However, you really should find out what was drawing enough current to cause wires to heat up that much. Would be a short somewhere, but not necessarily a dead short. Also says something about the over current protection in the power supply, should have shut off before letting that much current get drawn.

I have had faulty CPUs draw an extreme amount of power. You could have a short to ground through something only slightly conductive, or any number of electrical component failures causing this.
 

VeriX_

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Not clear what you want to remove? Is your ATX connector melted in?

Or do you want to replace the pins? Google pin removal tool, should be all you need there. You can also order new molex pins.

However, you really should find out what was drawing enough current to cause wires to heat up that much. Would be a short somewhere, but not necessarily a dead short. Also says something about the over current protection in the power supply, should have shut off before letting that much current get drawn.

I have had faulty CPUs draw an extreme amount of power. You could have a short to ground through something only slightly conductive, or any number of electrical component failures causing this.
Thanks for the reply. I might have forgot to mention it earlier but what I’m trying to do is get rid of the molten plastic inside of the connector - Motherboard (PSU was replaced shortly after the accident). Are you saying that the pins inside of the MOBO connector should be replaced?

Previous PSU - Modecom FEEL 1
 

BogdanH

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Pins inside ATX connector have been overheated and so a thin layer has been built on their surface. Normally, it would be enough if you clean them (fine sandpaper), but that's impossible, because you can't reach them inside socket. It's very important pins to have perfect contact (conductivity), otherwise mobo might not work properly and pins will probably overheat again.
Yes, if you have tools and skill, replace pins -I wouldn't use mobo as it is (on your photo).
 

VeriX_

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Pins inside ATX connector have been overheated and so a thin layer has been built on their surface. Normally, it would be enough if you clean them (fine sandpaper), but that's impossible, because you can't reach them inside socket. It's very important pins to have perfect contact (conductivity), otherwise mobo might not work properly and pins will probably overheat again.
Yes, if you have tools and skill, replace pins -I wouldn't use mobo as it is (on your photo).
Going to post a better picture of the motherboard currently in the topic soon, was thinking of using heated clippers to remove the remaining plastic. As for the pins I’m pretty sure those were clean of any debree (going to try anyway somehow sanding them down). Correct me If I’m wrong (and as for long term use of this board - only to troubleshoot CPU). Don’t really wanna go on de soldering all 24 motherboard pins.
 

BogdanH

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I was only commenting on what I can see on your photo in 1st post. And there, only 2 pins seems to be the problem -yeah, replacing all pins doesn't really make sense :)
 

VeriX_

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I was only commenting on what I can see on your photo in 1st post. And there, only 2 pins seems to be the problem -yeah, replacing all pins doesn't really make sense :)
Yeah I thought of it more of a full replacement of the motherboard ATX connector, as for the picture (honestly didn’t expect it to be as that bad after finally taking it out), but here it is:
View: https://imgur.com/a/LVR1pF3


Do you guys see any chance of cleaning it without replacing even those 2 pins?
 

BogdanH

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Sep 21, 2020
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I don't recommend "cleaning" only. At full load, there can be up to about 8A current on each of these two (10 & 11) pins and if contact is not perfect, it will melt again.
If that would happen to me and motherboard would be of high value for me, then I would try to replace whole ATX power slot (plastic housing is quite damaged from what I can see). It can be done with enough patience and if you have experience with soldering.. many times more important: experience with un-soldering (removing tin without overheating motherboard contacts).
Maybe someone else will come will come with better solution.
 

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