[SOLVED] Need help diagnosing a bad on-board LAN port

Dealer of Aces

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Alright I'll try to keep the background short. My neighborhood recently was upgraded to gigabit internet. Naturally I purchased it immediately. I've had some weird things occur with periodic lag and such in the past couple months but nothing major. But now we've been having a lot of issues with the network speed being cut in over half. Which would be okay but I'm experiencing a ton of lag, rubber banding, and VoIP programs constantly cutting out for seconds at a time or becoming robotic. The ISP has replaced every single thing from my house including the lines going to the local nodes. I've determined that everything on their end is fixed and now when I have issues everything is still working perfect. I get full 930d/20u on every speed test. I have cat 7 cables connecting everything and I've double checked with multiple cables and the desktop is the only one having the issue. Many times it will still get full speed until its been running for a while. I can tell when I'm in game that if I run a speed test it will be low. Its odd because the speed test will shoot up to 700 then slowly go down until the speedtest times out in the 300 range.

So my question is, does this sound like a bad onboard port? I can assure you that the modem, and all ethernet cables are not the problem but I'm not sure if theres a fix that could be tried or if this even sounds like a dying ports behavior.

If any other information is needed please let me know and I'll answer as quickly as possible. All help is greatly appreciated!


i5 8600k
Asus ROG Strix z370-g
GTX 1080 ti
16 gb ddr
Corsair 750 watt psu
 

Dealer of Aces

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If this happens to this one PC and no other, well, u have narrowed it down to a common denominator... always suspect software before hardware. U running W10? with a proper W10 LAN driver?
I am running windows 10. Not sure why I didn't include that in the description of the pc :LOL:. I've went to the manufacturers website and downloaded the LAN drivers. I uninstalled the drivers that were on the machine and installed those. It didn't seem to make a difference though.
 
Jun 28, 2019
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Sounds to me like everything is working fine. Your “gig” internet is probably only available in “bursts.” Great for advertising. I grew up in the dial-up days so enjoy your 300 Mb/s; it’s 5 times as fast as the service I have now.

How was your service before the upgrade? Did your VOIP work fine then? Did you suddenly buy a whole bunch of bandwidth hogging devices and services after upgrading?
 

Dealer of Aces

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Sounds to me like everything is working fine. Your “gig” internet is probably only available in “bursts.” Great for advertising. I grew up in the dial-up days so enjoy your 300 Mb/s; it’s 5 times as fast as the service I have now.

How was your service before the upgrade? Did your VOIP work fine then? Did you suddenly buy a whole bunch of bandwidth hogging devices and services after upgrading?
Nothing has changed usage wise. My service was fine before the upgrade and my VoIP (discord) worked fine. I would feel silly complaining about 300 Mbps if the speed were my complain. My complaint is packet loss, lag, rubber banding, and spiking ping.
 

Dealer of Aces

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Found the issue. The ISP was still the problem but it was harder to detect on our end. After 10 visits from technicians, the technicians saying there were issues they couldn't fix, customer support saying the lines are fine and the technicians are wrong, and FCC and BBB filings it appears we're just going to change service providers. I'm not thrilled about dropping from 1000/20 to 25/5 but I suppose stable and slow is better than fast and "I don't know whats happening."
 

AllanGH

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I purchased it immediately.
Not your fault, but that's the problem....

No new technology roll-out plan survives contact with reality.

ALL roll-outs have hitches, glitches, and plain-old screw-ups; and it never helps when an ISP oversells their own capacity.
Adopting something new always seems to go better for the consumer who waits about a year before making the move himself, or herself.
 
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Dealer of Aces

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Not your fault, but that's the problem....

No new technology roll-out plan survives contact with reality.

ALL roll-outs have hitches, glitches, and plain-old screw-ups; and it never helps when an ISP oversells their own capacity.
Adopting something new always seems to go better for the consumer who waits about a year before making the move himself, or herself.
You're right. I honestly should've been patient. I come from a very small town (Pop: 560) in the coal fields of West Virginia and moving away from that area and finding out that its an option got me overly excited.
 

Dealer of Aces

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The ISP has installed some new hardware at our local node. Pinging www.google.com 2500 times twice resulted in 5 and 6 packet lost respectively. The results 2495 and 2496 packets sent successfully over that period. The latency seemed good with a few spikes. 9 min 13 average 286 max. Is that acceptable packets lost?
 
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AllanGH

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For me, acceptable packet loss is 0; but you're probably going through a period of growing pains.

If you see a decrease in packet loss, over time, as well an increase of average speeds, you're going in the right direction and waiting before jumping ship becomes a better idea.
 

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