Question One or more of my fans keep ramping up and down and I don't know which ones ?

Aug 20, 2020
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Ive tried to fix this for a while by my self but i havent found much out on why its doing it, ive looked at HWinfo when they rise up and cant see what one is doing it, ive set custom fan curves in the BIOS, tried my hardest to make sure they were not aggressive.
made sure all the fans are plugged in correctly.

CPU - 8600k
Mobo - Asrock Z370 Extreame4
CPU Cooler - Corsair H100i V2
GPU - 2080 Windforce
Chassis Fans - 3x Be Quiet! Silent Wings 3

is there a chance the software for the AIO and the BIOS could be overwriting each other? ive seen a post mentioning that.
 

MJS WARLORD

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The easiest way to see which fan is ramping up speed is to run the pc with the side panel off and watch them running.
What exactly are you doing when the fans speed increases ?
Look in start up menu to see if you have something running that you dont know about.
 
Aug 20, 2020
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The easiest way to see which fan is ramping up speed is to rub the pc with the side panel off and watch them running.
What exactly are you doing when the fans speed increase.
Look in start up menu to see if you have something running that you dont know about
when they ramp up im playing a game, never ramp up while idle.
 

iPeekYou

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Jul 7, 2014
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when they ramp up im playing a game, never ramp up while idle.
They should be, under workloads like games, rendering, zipping/unzipping, the CPU is going to release heat. The rise in temp reading causes the BIOS/software to ramp up the fans to dissipate said heat. On idle, not much is going on and sometimes the CPU can even set some of its cores to sleep, i.e. we're not putting out much heat from the CPU.
Plus, you might see some spiking in temps while gaming; it can be either the game itself is putting extra load on the CPU; or Windows is doing so. It's normal and expected. Stable, high temps under load is usually with synthetic loads (like benchmarks) that put the CPU under constant and consistent load.

itd all controlled through ICUE and i need that for the lighting.
Ah, I see. Never had iCUE myself; the lights setting won't stay with the AIO itself when iCUE is uninstalled?
 
Aug 20, 2020
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They should be, under workloads like games, rendering, zipping/unzipping, the CPU is going to release heat. The rise in temp reading causes the BIOS/software to ramp up the fans to dissipate said heat. On idle, not much is going on and sometimes the CPU can even set some of its cores to sleep, i.e. we're not putting out much heat from the CPU.


Ah, I see. Never had iCUE myself; the lights setting won't stay with the AIO itself when iCUE is uninstalled?
i will check that now actually, i believe they will go to stock settings though.
 
Aug 20, 2020
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That's somewhat expected, but I remember my old Wraith Prism cooler will keep its RGB settings even when its software is inactive/uninstalled. That was with Cooler Master, though, not Corsair's software.
no it didnt work, had HWinfo up while i was testing it and just couldnt see what one was doing it at all, anything else i could try?
 

iPeekYou

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no it didnt work, had HWinfo up while i was testing it and just couldnt see what one was doing it at all, anything else i could try?
The one way I can think of right now is by putting a load on the PC so we get warm temps, then manually unplugging/plugging each fans from the connector or fan hub to see which one is behaving erratically. PWM fans are hotswap, you can safely do this with the system on.

If they're just ramping up and down according to temps, you might want to do another fan curve. BQ's fans are quite low noise AFAIK, so I think there's little gain in changing the fans instead.
 
Aug 20, 2020
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The one way I can think of right now is by putting a load on the PC so we get warm temps, then manually unplugging/plugging each fans from the connector or fan hub to see which one is behaving erratically. PWM fans are hotswap, you can safely do this with the system on.

If they're just ramping up and down according to temps, you might want to do another fan curve. BQ's fans are quite low noise AFAIK, so I think there's little gain in changing the fans instead.
thats why i think its my AIO/gpu , water pumps do get fairly noisy while under load, from what i could see my cpu never really goes above 60c though while my gpu hits 80c.
 

iPeekYou

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thats why i think its my AIO/gpu , water pumps do get fairly noisy while under load, from what i could see my cpu never really goes above 60c though while my gpu hits 80c.
To see which fans (CPU or GPU), use a component specific test: such as MSI Kombustor or Heaven for GPU, Prime95/OCCT for CPU. Those apps will stress the corresponding components individually so you can hear which one's fans are making the noise.
 
Aug 20, 2020
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To see which fans (CPU or GPU), use a component specific test: such as MSI Kombustor or Heaven for GPU, Prime95/OCCT for CPU. Those apps will stress the corresponding components individually so you can hear which one's fans are making the noise.
completely forgot about this thread but i ran Heaven and it started ramping up, how should i set my fan curve?
 

iPeekYou

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completely forgot about this thread but i ran Heaven and it started ramping up, how should i set my fan curve?
Is the GPU the source of noise then? If it is, then set a curve where the maximum point of the curve is the noise level you're willing to tolerate. Set the rest of the curve accordingly --usually it's a curve where it gets steeper towards the end.

If you see dangerous temps and/or throttling at the maximum noise level, you might want to add another point at the end of the curve that goes up to maximum fans anyway. Some GPU fans are unfortunately loud, so if the speed where noise is comfortable isn't enough for the GPU, you're pretty much stuck with it.
 
Aug 20, 2020
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Is the GPU the source of noise then? If it is, then set a curve where the maximum point of the curve is the noise level you're willing to tolerate. Set the rest of the curve accordingly --usually it's a curve where it gets steeper towards the end.

If you see dangerous temps and/or throttling at the maximum noise level, you might want to add another point at the end of the curve that goes up to maximum fans anyway. Some GPU fans are unfortunately loud, so if the speed where noise is comfortable isn't enough for the GPU, you're pretty much stuck with it.
the max temp ive seen on the gpu is 81c, ive tried to set it so it hits 100% speed before that but no luck atm
 

iPeekYou

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the max temp ive seen on the gpu is 81c, ive tried to set it so it hits 100% speed before that but no luck atm
Yeah, some GPU coolers do that. Run loud and still get hot. That said, GPUs especially Nvidias run their clocks up to a predetermined limit in temps, similar to what AMD is doing on their CPUs.

The only thing I can think of now is to set a different curve to try and offset the fluctuation in noise. Better to have a consistent tone than a fluctuating one. Generally I'd say a less aggressive curve so the fans don't ramp up and down too quickly.
 

Fiorezy

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Jul 3, 2020
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If the same fans are connected to one header through a splitter, they should all run at one speed/

The best to identify which fans are causing the issue for you, first you need to monitor your cpu temperature, whenever the fans ramp up, take a note of the temperature value then go the bios and check each fan curve you have set.

Alternatively, you can physically disconnect your fan headers one at a time and check which set is causing the issue.

And btw, it could also be the chipset fan, it is too small and it could get loud sometimes.
 
Aug 20, 2020
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Yeah, some GPU coolers do that. Run loud and still get hot. That said, GPUs especially Nvidias run their clocks up to a predetermined limit in temps, similar to what AMD is doing on their CPUs.

The only thing I can think of now is to set a different curve to try and offset the fluctuation in noise. Better to have a consistent tone than a fluctuating one. Generally I'd say a less aggressive curve so the fans don't ramp up and down too quickly.
ive changed the fan curve a couple times and still no luck, can you think of anything else?
 
Hi
Have you checked in Icue
To make sure the pump is on extreme
And set to monitor the h100iv2 sensor.
If it is set to cpu the I have had those rad fans constantly ramp up and down.

If the H100iv2 is contected per the instructions the bios Will Not control the fans, that where Icue comes in.

Gpu at 80-81c tells me it's not getting enough air flow.

Good to see you gave us your specs but you didn't tell us what case.
 
Aug 20, 2020
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Hi
Have you checked in Icue
To make sure the pump is on extreme
And set to monitor the h100iv2 sensor.
If it is set to cpu the I have had those rad fans constantly ramp up and down.

If the H100iv2 is contected per the instructions the bios Will Not control the fans, that where Icue comes in.

Gpu at 80-81c tells me it's not getting enough air flow.

Good to see you gave us your specs but you didn't tell us what case.
I have the corsair crystal 460x.

i have 3 fans as exhaust those are Silent Wings 3 then two exhaust.
 

madmatt30

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I have the corsair crystal 460x.

i have 3 fans as exhaust those are Silent Wings 3 then two exhaust.
So your AIO is in the front as an intake?

If that's the case then increased gpu temps are pretty much unavoidable in all honesty.

Its the sacrifice you make for running a cpu aio as a front intake thus inflating internal case temperatures.

Add in the fact that the 2080/2080ti windforce coolers are mediocre at best and you can't do much about the fan noise.

Plenty of reviews of these cards hitting mid 80s even at 100% fan speed which seems the norm.

What are your ambient room temps like? That'll have the biggest bearing on gpu temperatures.
 
Aug 20, 2020
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So no intake fans.
Is that correct?

Then no wonder.

Please post some pics.
So your AIO is in the front as an intake?

If that's the case then increased gpu temps are pretty much unavoidable in all honesty.

Its the sacrifice you make for running a cpu aio as a front intake thus inflating internal case temperatures.

Add in the fact that the 2080/2080ti windforce coolers are mediocre at best and you can't do much about the fan noise.

Plenty of reviews of these cards hitting mid 80s even at 100% fan speed which seems the norm.

What are your ambient room temps like? That'll have the biggest bearing on gpu temperatures.

ahh realised i messed up in my previous comment, i have 3 intake those are the silent wings, then 2 exhaust along with the rad.
 

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