Overclocking GeForce GTX 1080 Ti To 2.1 GHz Using Water

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AlexanderVFD

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You mention using "digital sensors". Now, I'm only an industrial maintenance technician that maintains a 7000T drop forge, so I could be mistaken-- Last I checked, switches are digital(on/off), and sensors provide an analogue signal, via 4-20mA, 2-8VDC, or 0-10VDC. Can you please elaborate on this digital sensor?
 

Rookie_MIB

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You're confusing digital with binary. A switch is binary (on/off). Digital means (in this case) - not analog. It might use somewhat analog material properties in determining the temperature - as in reading a thermistor built into the electronic IC circuit - but it returns a full digital result in degrees C (normally) and has all the electronics necessary to report a result.

An analog temp sensor equivalent would be the actual thermistor itself. But, you would need the other parts necessary to determine the temp. Something to measure the resistance of the thermistor, then the conversion tables for the materials to convert the resistance readings into actual temperatures.

A digital circuit isolates the end user from all that and just returns a result calculated from it's digital circuitry.
 

Sayasith

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I'm looking to get the same watercooling build. Can anyone tell me what type of tubing is that? those look way more simple than regular tubing.
 

Terry Perry

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And in another Year or so All new cards will be out Beating this. Look how many T.I.'s there have been in 6 years. This card is Still not ready for full 4K. VERY CLOSE
 

Stubbies

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Sparkyman215 I think I get what you are aiming for and it is a rather interesting oversight that they didn't graph a stock one next to these results but thankfully since the 1080Ti FE was also tested on The Witcher 3 at the same resolution we can pull numbers from that one for a rough comparison.

The look at the FE on The Witcher 3 produced 96 FPS min and 114.8 FPS average and that *should* be somewhere in the stated 1480-1580 GPU boost range quoted. That does match up decently at the close to 1600 level so adding in those extra 500 MHz looks like it hit 99 FPS min and 121 or 122 Average. Roughly 3 extra FPS on the min and 6 or 7 FPS for the average.
 

Achaios

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Don't think it is worth it to spend $699 and an additional $399 for a Custom Water Loop, not to say anything about work required to set this up properly (abt 2 days), on a card that will be completely outclassed in every possible way by the next NVIDIA architecture to come around Dec 2017.
 


I interpreted his message as asking for a comparison of the results with the stock card versus (w/ air cooler) versus the same card with water block ... perhaps because I was also looking for the same thing (w/o having to flip back and forth between the two articles.




That's not really a fair comparison.

1. One analogy I find appropriate is when folks say , well it's not worth it to spend $120 instead of $100, a 20% increase in cost, for faster RAM when average gains in gaming fps are 2 -3 % (actual 0% say for Metro - 11% for F1). However, that's a false equivalency because the entire system is going faster, not just the RAM, so the increase in cost on a $1,500 system for boosting the RAM speed is just 1.33%

2. That water block is not just bringing a performance increase, it's drastically reducing noise, temperatures and improving aesthetics. It's also bringing home more stable CPU OCs.

3. The loop was already there. If desired, you can get a prefilled block or even a card with prefilled water block installed, if time is a concern reducing your additional install time to seconds.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sq4iNbCD844

4. Two days ? Unless you are doing a build w/ custom bends and rigid acrylic tubing, it won't take two days. Adding a water block to a Swiftech AIO for example:

Attach block = 20 minutes.
Install 2nd radiator = 10 minutes
Install (4) G-1/4 compression fittings = 5 minutes
Cut and install tubing = 15 minutes
Drain, mix and add coolant = 20 minutes

Then you are going to let it run for an hour, come back and bleed it a bit ... rinse and repeat at 4 hours and 24 hours but if it tales more than 90 - 120 minutes total of actual time investment, that would be unusual.

Installing the Swiftech at the same time would add 20 minutes tops.

5. Yes the next architecture will top it ... but so will the next one so that kinda kills the relevance. Typically, folks keep GFX cards anywhere from 2 - 6 years except for the minority of "must have latest new thing" folks. You already built the box, you already bought the Ti, so the real additional cost is the $125 block, $80 2nd radiator (if 1st one wasn't big enough, the (4) fittings ($50 for fancy smancy ones) , coolant ($12) and tubing ($8).

6. Personally, with no performance increase, I'd have no issue forking over $300 for the silence alone.

But ultimately, purchase decisions are a cost / benefit analysis where the value gained from the purchase is weighed against the value spent. As each individual's goal's are different, and each person's disposable income / financial obligations are different, a sound decision for one is a ridiculous decision for another. As far as water cooling a GFX card goes, the only decision I would argue against is doing it on a FE card as the value gained from the investment is going to be somewhat gimped by the limitations of the reference PCB itself.

Of course, Boost 3 is already nerfing performance on the 10xx series, and as of yet no one has as yet cracked the BIOS and developed a BIOS Editor which might allow one to push back these limits. So it remains to be seen just how much this will be a factor in WC can take things. In the last two generations, nVidia has nerfed what AIB partners can accomplish, (both legally and physically) and rendered the extreme cards (Lightning, Matrix, Classified) somewhat irrelevant given their substantial additional cost. But last generation, the "what we could do part" increased a bit w/ each jump towards the top tier. We'll have to wait till the AIB cards are tested to see what's going to be possible It's great to see just what could be accomplished with the new TI, but still, I wouldn't invest $250 or more in adding GFX water cooling w/o spending the extra $20 on an AIB card.

 

FormatC

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If you buy good custom water cooling parts, you can use it over a lot of years. My oldest parts in another build are from 2007, running nearly ten years without any issues. The water block can be changed very fast (within 30 minutes or less). If you are using quick connectors in the loop, you haven't to do anything else on your loop.

2 days for a custom loop? Ok, with hardtubing, might be. But if you are using normal tubes and you have a plan what you are doing, this takes only a few hours. I've built my Core P5 within 2 hours. With leakage check.

This is not so easy to compare, because it are two totally different systems. Chris' 7700K runs on higher clocks. My system is in a closed bench table. More real world, because the stock card is running heated on only at 1650 MHz (temperature limit). This was the reason why I have not copied his charts data. To produce more load for power consumption I was also using another benchmark scene.

But guys, you can compare it very easy. You can take a look at my charts at the point around 1600 MHz to see the performance of the stock air-cooled card. :)
 

LanzoCommando

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Myself as well. It would be interesting to see them together in one spot from the same person so the variables are the same.

I've thought about this cooling setup but like someone posted above I know the next architecture with beat this card, so if it (the card is sitting on my porch waiting for me right now!!!) can crush my 2K setup in stock form without issue (which it absolutely should) I may stay away from this solution unless I end up with a 4K monitor and have the need to push the card, but even then the one I want will be 1300 plus so I may do myself a solid if I wait for Volta and upgrade then.
 

gaborbarla

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Not to mention that you void your warranty big-time with this and immediately, losing the value of warranty of the card. But I think this is all about a hobby and having fun and less about return for value. So this is a reasonably large investment for minimal returns, because the FE cooler can also OC to some extent and an extra 5-10% is not worth it for everyone.
 

LanzoCommando

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"Handles" depends on what frames you like to play with. Some of us like to stay well above 60 FPS....in the case of your 980TI I'd say above 30 or 40.

Whenever my 144hz monitor drops out to 60 hz it makes me cringe instantly. I can't really even stand 60hz anymore. I'll never go back to lower than 60 FPS...and honestly....even 60 is too low now that I've seen the light.
 

LanzoCommando

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I think Volta is going to get there...at the very least the generation after. The 1080TI is there right now...but just at the edge. The jump promised from NVIDIA from Pascal to Volta wont be as large as the gap from before to Pascal, but even if it's a quarter of the gap gained in Pascal we are talking 70-80 FPS from a single card all day every day.
 

FormatC

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I tried it up to 5800 MHz, but it wasn't really stable. The problem is, that Micron is selecting the memory modules into this 11GB/s and better 12GB/s modules by themself. All better silicon is sold as the more expensive series.

 

FormatC

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I wrote above:

This is not so easy to compare, because it are two totally different systems. Chris' 7700K runs on higher clocks. My system is in a closed bench table. More real world, because the stock card is running heated on only at 1650 MHz (temperature limit). This was the reason why I have not copied his charts data. To produce more load for power consumption I was also using another benchmark scene.

But guys, you can compare it very easy. You can take a look at my charts at the point around 1600 MHz to see the performance of the stock air-cooled card. :)
 


1. nVidia has been ramping up what it does ... both legally and physically to the board designs that AIB partners have less and less freedom. Having 80% of the market place tends to allow you to to be a bit more demanding :).

2. nVidia hates it when peeps SLI two x70s instead of one x80, so we've seen a push down there to.

3. Until someone breaks the new Boost 3 equipped BIOS and releases a BIOS editor, we won't really know what the architecture is capable of.
 

FormatC

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I don't like SLI. I have two 1080's in my gaming table and only a few games are scaling right. Mostly I get only up 25% more performance or simply nothing, but other issues like stuttering and a useless high power consumption for a few additional FPS. Multi-GPU is dead :(
 
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