Question PC not POSTing!

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That's quite interesting, so you're saying that even if the voltage levels are normal, it might not be able to fully go through the process?

Out of curiosity, would you be able to think of a reason for the PC going in a reboot loop this time round when it didn't last time?
That's correct...when the PSU comes under load the voltage falls and the PSU has to 'add voltage', so to speak, to keep it in range. If it doesn't due to defect it's not good. Also, the paperclip test tells you nothing about ripple, which are small, fast variations in the voltage that can confuse VRM buck regulators that are on the motherboard. When it comes under load, defective filtering in the PSU will let ripple go crazy.

Different motherboards can respond differently to a low voltage or high ripple condition.
 
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For Raven Ridge (your CPU)? Here
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Maybe I am world's biggest dumbo, I really hope I'm not wrong with this, but the ddr4 Corsair 3000mhz 2x8gb kit is listed in this QVL
CMK16GX4M2B3000C15
Instead, I just bought a single rank of this, hence only 8gb. But surely this should not actually make an impact?
 
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That's correct...when the PSU comes under load the voltage falls and the PSU has to 'add voltage', so to speak, to keep it in range. If it doesn't due to defect it's not good. Also, the paperclip test tells you nothing about ripple, which are small, fast variations in the voltage that can confuse VRM buck regulators that are on the motherboard. When it comes under load, defective filtering in the PSU will let ripple go crazy.

Different motherboards can respond differently to a low voltage or high ripple condition.
Woah thanks for this, perhaps you are right, i will repost again tomorrow when I wake up as I am beginning to get extremely stressed out about all of this.
 
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Hard to tell. Compatibility testing verifies that the memory gets recognized and works successfully, it does not mean that the ones that are not tested will not work, it just assures that the tested ones will...
Yeah, I understand where you're coming from, but I mean, would it really make a difference if I just bought the same memory again for a dual channel system? Surely it should boot up at least

Edit: I've cross-checked websites, pcpartpicker among them and the RAM seems to be compatible.
 
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So unless I've somehow blown the new Mobo, or it's faulty, it's looking like the cpu or PSU. Is there any way that I can verify it is the one or the other without replacing parts?
 
Hard to tell. Compatibility testing verifies that the memory gets recognized and works successfully, it does not mean that the ones that are not tested will not work, it just assures that the tested ones will...
And even buying tested, QVC listed memory is really no assurance since the memory controller is on the CPU and depends on the silicon quality just like any other overclocking is subject to.

If the memory is of decent quality with no defects, not in motherboard or CPU either, then it's highly unlikely it won't at least boot up in DDR4 default clock speed...which is VERY slow 2133 or 2400...even if not on the QVC. The only thing QVC listing provides is some assurance it will run at the clock speed BOTH the CPU and memory is rated. Which I think is 2666 for a 2200G since it's based on Zen 1st gen.
 
So unless I've somehow blown the new Mobo, or it's faulty, it's looking like the cpu or PSU. Is there any way that I can verify it is the one or the other without replacing parts?
One way would be get a PC speaker and connect to the speaker terminals. It should give you a 'beep' notification to tell you how far it gets in POST. The beeps are encoded, just look them up and it would give some clues.

Otherwise, you'll need at least a DMM: put it on a +12V lead and watch what voltage does as the system boot loops. If the voltage varies to an extreme, especially dropping below ~11.4V or above 12.6V, you'll know it's not regulating very well and that's a clue it's bad. A really good DMM can also measure ripple. That's not a good test, but it's something you can do without more sophisticated test equipment.

And at this point, it's probably good to just revisit some basics. Since you're having so much difficulty getting things to work it's definitely suggested you be doing this in a bench-test arrangement, with nothing inside the case. I like to lay my motherboard on a cotton towel on table top, then connect everything up (PSU connections, HDD's, monitor, keyboard, etc.) with it laying there. You could even put a discrete GPU in and use that if you had one in your build.

Triple/quadruple check connections. ESPECIALLY that they are tight and secure. I've seen way too many systems where they did not fully engage memory into the DIMM's as they didn't like putting that much force to do it. MAKE SURE the DIMM is clicked in and the latch(es) are engaged in the notch(es). Also make sure the 8 pin ATXv connection is secure for CPU power as well as the 24 pin motherboard. They're hard to get in, but it's easier on a bench top set up to make sure they are fully engaged and no pins are pushing back out.

And check for pushed pins as it's sometimes pretty easy for a pin in those flimsy sockets on the PSU cables to not engage and actually back out. Check each and every one of the 24 pin connector pins, it's a lot easier to do that with it laid out in a bench top test. Although desireable to have all fully enganged there's less likely to be an issue with the 8 pin ATXv connector at the CPU because all it carries is 12V and ground on redundant pins there.
 
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Well lads. I have fantastic news. A bit embarrassing but still fantastic. Turns out I didn't push the ram in fa enough, I was too scared of breaking something so I guess I didn't use enough force. I'm sorry you all had to help me through all this only to find it was me being a softie, but sincerely I do thank you for everything. Best of luck boys.
 
Reactions: drea.drechsler
Well lads. I have fantastic news. A bit embarrassing but still fantastic. Turns out I didn't push the ram in fa enough, I was too scared of breaking something so I guess I didn't use enough force. I'm sorry you all had to help me through all this only to find it was me being a softie, but sincerely I do thank you for everything. Best of luck boys.
Good to hear you're running now!

With these things, it's very frequently something simple as that. I remember fretting over a no-boot system for an hour only to find the video card had come loose in the PCIe socket when I moved it into place. That's why they put latches on GPU sockets, but they're flimsy and often get broke.
 
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Good to hear you're running now!

With these things, it's very frequently something simple as that. I remember fretting over a no-boot system for an hour only to find the video card had come loose in the PCIe socket when I moved it into place. That's why they put latches on GPU sockets, but they're flimsy and often get broke.
Thanks drea, also thank you for all your help!
 

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