Question Questions about transferring to new PC.

May 2, 2019
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0
10
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So a couple days ago I purchased a set of parts to build my first PC, as I have watched many videos on how to do it over the last year or so. Now that parts are shipping and the build is happening I am coming to realize I have no clue how to deal with bios related stuff as well as how to move over my current HDD whilst also getting windows OS and games to boot of my new fancy RGB m.2 SSD. (yes I bought one of those it just looked so damn pretty lol)
Ultimately I have a few questions I will list as well as state the extent of my current knowledge, so you can correct me if I'm wrong or gauge if I'm heading in the right direction and if there's more I should know, please do let me know.
  • How will I transfer over my current HDD, but get the previously mentioned things to boot off the SSD
    • As far as I know from the little research I have done, it seems you can't simply move this stuff over in any way unless you're transferring everything. Am I correct in my assumption that first, internal hardware drivers for my current PC related to things such as mobo and GPU should be uninstalled on my current HDD first as to not interfere with new hardware, then I need to either find my product key, or if not, buy one off kinguin for cheap, get that onto a USB drive, and in the bios of my new PC, get it to boot off that drive to install windows onto the SSD, then when that's said and done, power off and put in my HDD and good to go? As for games running off SSD I am entirely clueless there. I would guess they must be reinstalled onto the SSD
  • What all do I do in the BIOS when I start my new PC aside from the previous storage stuff?
    • I know you want to check to make sure all parts/drives are recognized, enable XMP so memory runs at rated speed, and select boot drive. Anything else I should know here? Should this all be done on the first run through before installing windows or after? Does that even matter?
  • What happens next?
    • Just installing divers right? NVIDIA drivers, drivers for onboard wifi and Bluetooth, RGB software, and then anything related to my peripherals should be there and good to go from my HDD, correct?
 

daPain58

Great
Sep 30, 2019
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So a couple days ago I purchased a set of parts to build my first PC, as I have watched many videos on how to do it over the last year or so. Now that parts are shipping and the build is happening I am coming to realize I have no clue how to deal with bios related stuff as well as how to move over my current HDD whilst also getting windows OS and games to boot of my new fancy RGB m.2 SSD. (yes I bought one of those it just looked so damn pretty lol)
Ultimately I have a few questions I will list as well as state the extent of my current knowledge, so you can correct me if I'm wrong or gauge if I'm heading in the right direction and if there's more I should know, please do let me know.
  • How will I transfer over my current HDD, but get the previously mentioned things to boot off the SSD
    • As far as I know from the little research I have done, it seems you can't simply move this stuff over in any way unless you're transferring everything. Am I correct in my assumption that first, internal hardware drivers for my current PC related to things such as mobo and GPU should be uninstalled on my current HDD first as to not interfere with new hardware, then I need to either find my product key, or if not, buy one off kinguin for cheap, get that onto a USB drive, and in the bios of my new PC, get it to boot off that drive to install windows onto the SSD, then when that's said and done, power off and put in my HDD and good to go? As for games running off SSD I am entirely clueless there. I would guess they must be reinstalled onto the SSD
  • What all do I do in the BIOS when I start my new PC aside from the previous storage stuff?
    • I know you want to check to make sure all parts/drives are recognized, enable XMP so memory runs at rated speed, and select boot drive. Anything else I should know here? Should this all be done on the first run through before installing windows or after? Does that even matter?
  • What happens next?
    • Just installing divers right? NVIDIA drivers, drivers for onboard wifi and Bluetooth, RGB software, and then anything related to my peripherals should be there and good to go from my HDD, correct?
Install OS fresh instead of transferrinf. You dont need to change BIOS stuff, but change the settinf to use UEFI instead of Legacy BIOS as it has a performance hike. Install hardwares and drivers

Sent from my CPH1729 using Tapatalk
 
What is your list of old parts, and what is your list of new parts?
What is your old windows and what is your new windows.
You can install your old windows HDD in the new system, and see if it boots.
Being able to boot to windows on the new build is unlikely since the drivers and components may not be sufficiently similar.
If you can boot, then you only need to install the new motherboard drivers.
Then, you will need to deal with moving the HDD C drive to the new ssd. I hope the SSD has sufficient room for everything. Most ssd vendors will have a clone utility to do the job.
Likely, you are facing a new clean windows install.
In that case you will need to reinstall the games and apps. There is a procedure for steam games.


MY build process:

Before anything, while waiting for your parts to be delivered, download
and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manual.
Buy a #2 magnetic tip philips screwdriver.
I find it handy to buy a power switch like this for testing.
https://www.ebay.com/p/4in1-PC-Power-Reset-Switch-HDD-Motherboar-LED-Cable-Light-Wire-Kit-for-Computer/631889283?iid=142232821294&chn=ps

1. I assemble the critical parts outside of the case.
That lets me test them for functionality easily.
A wood table or cardboard is fine.
2. Plug in only the necessary parts at first. Ram, cpu, cooler, psu.
Do not force anything. Parts fit only one way.
Attach a monitor to the integrated motherboard adapter if you have one, otherwise to the graphics card.
  1. If your motherboard does not have a PWR button, momentarily touch the two pwr front panel pins with a flat blade screwdriver.
  2. Repeatedly hit F2 or DEL, and that should get you into the bios display.
  3. Boot from a cd or usb stick with memtest86 on it. memtest will exercise your ram and cpu functionality.
  4. Install windows.
  5. Install the motherboard cd drivers. Particularly the lan drivers so you can access the internet.
Do not select the easy install option, or you will get a bunch of utilities and trialware that you don't want. Drivers only.
  1. Connect to the internet and install an antivirus program. Microsoft security essentials is free, easy, and unobtrusive.
  2. Install your graphics card and driver if you tested with integrated graphics.
You will need to remove the graphics card later to install your motherboard in the case.
As a tip when screwing the motherboard into the posts, give the screw a small counterclockwise turn until you feel a click.
That lets you know that the screw will engage properly.
Make a note of how the graphics card latches into the pcie slot.
The mechanism will be hidden under the card and may be difficult to work if you have not previously checked how.
  1. Update windows to currency.
  2. Only now do I take apart what I need to and install it in the case.
  3. Now is the time to reinstall your graphics card.
 
Reactions: gardenman
May 2, 2019
5
0
10
0
What is your list of old parts, and what is your list of new parts?
What is your old windows and what is your new windows.
You can install your old windows HDD in the new system, and see if it boots.
Being able to boot to windows on the new build is unlikely since the drivers and components may not be sufficiently similar.
If you can boot, then you only need to install the new motherboard drivers.
Then, you will need to deal with moving the HDD C drive to the new ssd. I hope the SSD has sufficient room for everything. Most ssd vendors will have a clone utility to do the job.
Likely, you are facing a new clean windows install.
In that case you will need to reinstall the games and apps. There is a procedure for steam games.


MY build process:

Before anything, while waiting for your parts to be delivered, download
and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manual.
Buy a #2 magnetic tip philips screwdriver.
I find it handy to buy a power switch like this for testing.
https://www.ebay.com/p/4in1-PC-Power-Reset-Switch-HDD-Motherboar-LED-Cable-Light-Wire-Kit-for-Computer/631889283?iid=142232821294&chn=ps

1. I assemble the critical parts outside of the case.
That lets me test them for functionality easily.
A wood table or cardboard is fine.
2. Plug in only the necessary parts at first. Ram, cpu, cooler, psu.
Do not force anything. Parts fit only one way.
Attach a monitor to the integrated motherboard adapter if you have one, otherwise to the graphics card.
  1. If your motherboard does not have a PWR button, momentarily touch the two pwr front panel pins with a flat blade screwdriver.
  2. Repeatedly hit F2 or DEL, and that should get you into the bios display.
  3. Boot from a cd or usb stick with memtest86 on it. memtest will exercise your ram and cpu functionality.
  4. Install windows.
  5. Install the motherboard cd drivers. Particularly the lan drivers so you can access the internet.
Do not select the easy install option, or you will get a bunch of utilities and trialware that you don't want. Drivers only.
  1. Connect to the internet and install an antivirus program. Microsoft security essentials is free, easy, and unobtrusive.
  2. Install your graphics card and driver if you tested with integrated graphics.
You will need to remove the graphics card later to install your motherboard in the case.
As a tip when screwing the motherboard into the posts, give the screw a small counterclockwise turn until you feel a click.
That lets you know that the screw will engage properly.
Make a note of how the graphics card latches into the pcie slot.
The mechanism will be hidden under the card and may be difficult to work if you have not previously checked how.
  1. Update windows to currency.
  2. Only now do I take apart what I need to and install it in the case.
  3. Now is the time to reinstall your graphics card.

I will preface this by saying I've typed a lot cause I am very nitpicky about this stuff, so apologies for that haha. I've tried to make it easier to read and respond to by highlighting important things in orange, and questions I would prefer answered in red. I've been doing research all day btw so I may or may not have a much better idea what I'm doing now and might be all over the place in terms of my knowledge about this. Any advice, corrections, and answers you can provide are much appreciated.

Old Parts:
  • CPU: AMD FX-6300 Six-Core, 3.5 Ghz
  • Mobo: MSI 760GMA-P34(FX)
  • RAM: 1x8GB 1600Mhz C11
  • GPU: PNY GeForce GTX 1050ti 4GB XLR8 OC Edition
  • PSU: Insignia 520W Power Supply- Silver
  • HDD: 1tb Unknown, probably WD or Seagate
  • Case: Unknown
New Parts:
  • CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600
  • Mobo: MSI MPG X570 Gaming Pro Carbon Wifi (Pricy I know but wanted serious futureproof-ability and it looks pretty lol)
  • RAM: 2x8GB Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 3600Mhz C18
  • GPU: ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1660ti
  • PSU: Corsair RM750 80+ Gold
  • SSD: 512GB ADATA XPG S40G
  • Case: NZXT H510 (Black)
I talked with a friend who knows a bit about this and got a better idea of the situation and decided I will get a fresh copy of windows 10 home to install onto the SSD as my HDD has 800GB of stuff and the SSD is 500GB, and it sounds like it'll be easier this way. He said saves should still carry over fine from the HDD? What exactly, if anything, will be lost with the new windows 10 copy?

Honestly I will likely skip over the setting it up outside the case as well as doing memtest86 and whatnot unless perhaps you strongly advise it? I am just going to trust that everything will work fine either way and get everything in the case and then post, go through bios, and install windows.
Would I be correct in saying that all that is vital here for a beginner is to get familiar with the BIOS, make sure CPU is running up to base speeds, enable XMP for RAM, and then install windows onto the SSD? Once that is done, power off, plug in HDD, make sure it's recognized, and boot again, correct or am I missing anything here?

I guess I'm also just a little confused as to what drivers and stuff to install and how exactly? What all do you mean by motherboard cd drivers? As for lan drivers (which I assume its just wifi and bluetooth), would it be possible to just plug in my old usb wifi adapter to the rear IO and access the internet for a period that way after my HDD is installed, then get to all drivers that way, download and install them on my desktop, good to go? Or will the usb wifi adapter's drivers be lost in the new windows install? If so how do I install them? Would I have to put them on a USB drive on my old system, plug that into the new one and install from BIOS?

As far as I know now, the drivers that I would need/maybe want to installing is:

From the mobo website:

  • All lan drivers
    • On board audio
    • Most recent version of BIOS? Or does the board come with it?
    • System and Chipset Drivers? (I assume this is unnecessary)
    • On board PIDE/SATA Drivers? (I assume this is unnecessary too)
    • Dragon Center for RGB Mystic Light Control
From NVIDIA:

  • obviously the most recent 1660ti drivers which I assume I can easily get through GeForce Experience (which Idk if I will have to reinstall due to new windows copy)
Get antivirus like you said. I don't think I've had one before, so if I do have a virus that I am unaware of, would that be on my HDD and potentially effect my new system down the line? Or is this an unlikely worry? Is there software to scan and remove any if so?
And perhaps drivers for anything else RGB in the PC that doesn't use Mystic Light
Anything here I am missing? My guess is any peripheral drivers/software will transferred through HDD?

Finally, the last thing I'm still very curious about is are there any drivers on my current HDD that will mess with any of the new hardware? One video on YouTube said you want to uninstall some basic internal hardware drivers related to cpu, gpu, mobo. Or is this not a problem if I'm going the new windows copy route?
 
My suggestions:

Since you will abandon the fx system, you do not need to pay for a new windows license.
You have a new top end build, so do it right.
To keep the process simple,
Buy a 1tb samsung 860 EVO. Don't know about Adata quality, but samsung is considered best for reliability and performance.
Use the samsung ssd migration aid to copy your C drive to the ssd.

On your new system, just plug the ssd into a sata port and you should be able to boot.
Then, all you need to do is install the motherboard and other drivers with updated drivers.
If you have internet via lan, you will need a lan driver unless windows has found you a workable one.
Then, you can download anything from the internet.
Or, you may need a wifi driver if you will connect via wifi.
If you will use wifi,buy an adapter with an antenna. They will be stronger. Perhaps even a pcie attached wifi card.
Basic drivers will come with the motherboard on a cd.
You would need a sata dvd drive to connect temporarily, or use a cd drive attached via a usb connection.

There are two disadvantages to this.
  1. You will not have any ssd rgb bling. Not a big issue, I think since a m.2 device is buried under other parts anyway.
  2. You will be using a sata device, not a pcie device. A pcie device will have faster sequential speeds, but that is not as beneficial as it might seem.
Most of what you do will be small random I/O and there is no difference in performance between sata and pcie connection.

A more complicated way to get to a pcie device would be to buy a pcie adapter to hold a 970 evo to do the copy.
That might be something like this usb to pcie adapter:
https://www.amazon.com/QNINE-Adapter-Performance-Portable-Support/dp/B07JKWHFRC

Many will recommend a new clean install. That is really best so long as you can copw with the hassle of reinstalling/migrating apps.
This is the approach I used for my current(and previous build) So far, so good.
If you do a clean install on a small ssd,be prepared to reinstall all apps that use the registry, and that will be virtually all of them.
Steam games have a procedure to avoid this, but you will still be running off of a slow HDD.
Once all is on a ssd, repurpose the HDD to be a backup device.
You will also need to recreate all of your settings since windows 10 lo longer supports easy transfer.

I have found, by experience, that testing all outside the case first is a good idea.
It is easier to fix things outside of the case if anything goes wrong.
Installing in a case first exposes you to the possibility of shorts.

If the motherboard is fresh stock, it will have the latest bios level available at the time.
I do not recommend ever updating a bios unless the update contains a fix for a problem that is impacting you.
A failed flash can be very nasty to recover from.
Unfortunately, the latest ryzen motherboards seem to need bios fixes for ram issues. hope for the best there.
If your ram is on the motherboard ram QVL support list, you should have no problem.
It is easy to move a motherboard into a case with all parts connected.
It is usually only a matter of disconnecting the psu power cables and reattaching them.

I use memtest86 as a quick functional test.
It requires no OS and will confirm that the ram and processor work.
I would also let the ram boot to default speeds to confirm that it works.
XMP is really ram overclocking, and you do not really want to do any overclocking until you get it all working.

All graphics cards have a default low res mode that runs without any drivers at all.
To get full resolution and functionality, you will need to install the most current drivers, downloaded directly from nvidia.
I tend to do a custom install, deleting 3d , sound, and perhaps even nvidia experience.

Windows 10 comes with windows defender which is a very good app for known viruses.
There are other more resource heavy apps that look for in the wild viruses.
I do not find that necessary unless you regularly visit sketchy web sites such as porn sites.
Defender will scan for known viruses and keep itself updated via windows update.

Drivers take up little space and I would not bother about obsolete or unused drivers.
 

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