[SOLVED] rtx 3060 Temps

Fatblabs

Great
Jun 29, 2021
173
6
85
0
Hi! Recently just a month or two ago, I got a new PC with a Gigabyte RTX 3060 gaming OC. I noticed that my computer was heating the case and the room the computer was running in as well. After like 20-40 minutes of use, the room is already at 80 degrees F (when I first boot it up, the room temp was somewhere around 70 degrees F to 75 degrees F). I have 2 exhaust fans and 4 intake fans [4 intakes are on the front (1 fan on the CPU cooler since that the AIO CPU cooler is mounted on the front), and 1 exhaust fan on the back, and 1 more exhaust fan on the top of the case]. GPU temps are completely normal (ranging 50-62 degrees C while gaming)

Is there any way to improve cooling and keep room temps down at the same time? Or is this normal?

Note:
I don't like moving components around so plz don't make meh do that lols (if it's the only way to improve temps then that's okay :D)

and no replacing parts too >:I


Specs:
Apevia genesis
Gigabyte RTX 3060 gaming OC
6 fans total (the fan on the top and the fan on the AIO cooler is adjustable while all the other fans are Molex and non-adjustable.)




Programs you may need to know that I have installed:
Armoury Crate
AI Suite 3
 
Last edited:

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
Is there any way to improve cooling and keep room temps down at the same time? Or is this normal?
A PC is basically a space heater, so yes, it's normal for it to heat up the room.
The higher your power consumption, the faster your room will heat up, which eventually makes its way back to the PC - and no, liquid cooling does not change that:
-A 300w gpu running at 80C
-A 300w gpu running at 60C
Still dumping up to 300w of heat into your room. Doesn't matter how hot or cool your parts are running, if their power consumption stays more or less the same.


Here's some ways you can deal/cope with it:
1)Run A/C longer.
2)Open a window, take a fan and aim it to blow out the window. You can also do this with the door to your room instead.
3)Remove cpu and gpu overclocks, and enable Intel Speed Shift and disable Speed Step, in bios.
4)Use Windows balanced power plan.
5)Use Adaptive power plan in Nvidia Control Panel. You can find it in Manage 3D Settings > Power Management Mode.
6)Use a negative voltage offset on the cpu.
Enter bios, and find the cpu's Vcore settings. Change it to Offset mode. Enter a negative offset of 0.050v. You may even be able to go even further, like 0.100v.
Future bios updates may contain improved voltage curves, so an offset you enter now may not be stable after said update.

7)Undervolt the gpu.
Use Msi Afterburner. It has a hardware monitor - open it, and make sure Core Clock and Gpu Voltage are among the graphs that can be viewed.
If not, go to Settings > Monitoring, find them, click the check icon, click Apply and exit Settings.
Leaving Afterburner and its monitoring running in the background, play your games - a few minutes is perhaps all you need - close the game, and then pull up the hardware monitor.
Record the MAX core clock and gpu voltage, and open Afterburner's Curve Editor. You will then be presented with your gpu's voltage/frequency curve.
Take the gpu voltage number you recorded earlier and subtract 0.05v from it. Find the new value - or the one closest to it - in one of the points on the V/F curve, and click on it.
Use the up arrow key and raise the frequency until it matches the gpu core clock you recorded earlier, press the L key to lock it, and click the Apply button on the main HUD.
Congrats! You just applied the undervolt.
Save the profile in one of Afterburner's numbered slots for easy access later.
Now when you are about to play, open Afterburner, click the profile the undervolt was saved under, click Apply and play away. When done, click the reset button and close Afterburner.
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
Is there any way to improve cooling and keep room temps down at the same time? Or is this normal?
A PC is basically a space heater, so yes, it's normal for it to heat up the room.
The higher your power consumption, the faster your room will heat up, which eventually makes its way back to the PC - and no, liquid cooling does not change that:
-A 300w gpu running at 80C
-A 300w gpu running at 60C
Still dumping up to 300w of heat into your room. Doesn't matter how hot or cool your parts are running, if their power consumption stays more or less the same.


Here's some ways you can deal/cope with it:
1)Run A/C longer.
2)Open a window, take a fan and aim it to blow out the window. You can also do this with the door to your room instead.
3)Remove cpu and gpu overclocks, and enable Intel Speed Shift and disable Speed Step, in bios.
4)Use Windows balanced power plan.
5)Use Adaptive power plan in Nvidia Control Panel. You can find it in Manage 3D Settings > Power Management Mode.
6)Use a negative voltage offset on the cpu.
Enter bios, and find the cpu's Vcore settings. Change it to Offset mode. Enter a negative offset of 0.050v. You may even be able to go even further, like 0.100v.
Future bios updates may contain improved voltage curves, so an offset you enter now may not be stable after said update.

7)Undervolt the gpu.
Use Msi Afterburner. It has a hardware monitor - open it, and make sure Core Clock and Gpu Voltage are among the graphs that can be viewed.
If not, go to Settings > Monitoring, find them, click the check icon, click Apply and exit Settings.
Leaving Afterburner and its monitoring running in the background, play your games - a few minutes is perhaps all you need - close the game, and then pull up the hardware monitor.
Record the MAX core clock and gpu voltage, and open Afterburner's Curve Editor. You will then be presented with your gpu's voltage/frequency curve.
Take the gpu voltage number you recorded earlier and subtract 0.05v from it. Find the new value - or the one closest to it - in one of the points on the V/F curve, and click on it.
Use the up arrow key and raise the frequency until it matches the gpu core clock you recorded earlier, press the L key to lock it, and click the Apply button on the main HUD.
Congrats! You just applied the undervolt.
Save the profile in one of Afterburner's numbered slots for easy access later.
Now when you are about to play, open Afterburner, click the profile the undervolt was saved under, click Apply and play away. When done, click the reset button and close Afterburner.
 

Fatblabs

Great
Jun 29, 2021
173
6
85
0
A PC is basically a space heater, so yes, it's normal for it to heat up the room.
The higher your power consumption, the faster your room will heat up, which eventually makes its way back to the PC - and no, liquid cooling does not change that:
-A 300w gpu running at 80C
-A 300w gpu running at 60C
Still dumping up to 300w of heat into your room. Doesn't matter how hot or cool your parts are running, if their power consumption stays more or less the same.


Here's some ways you can deal/cope with it:
1)Run A/C longer.
2)Open a window, take a fan and aim it to blow out the window. You can also do this with the door to your room instead.
3)Remove cpu and gpu overclocks, and enable Intel Speed Shift and disable Speed Step, in bios.
4)Use Windows balanced power plan.
5)Use Adaptive power plan in Nvidia Control Panel. You can find it in Manage 3D Settings > Power Management Mode.
6)Use a negative voltage offset on the cpu.
Enter bios, and find the cpu's Vcore settings. Change it to Offset mode. Enter a negative offset of 0.050v. You may even be able to go even further, like 0.100v.
Future bios updates may contain improved voltage curves, so an offset you enter now may not be stable after said update.

7)Undervolt the gpu.
Use Msi Afterburner. It has a hardware monitor - open it, and make sure Core Clock and Gpu Voltage are among the graphs that can be viewed.
If not, go to Settings > Monitoring, find them, click the check icon, click Apply and exit Settings.
Leaving Afterburner and its monitoring running in the background, play your games - a few minutes is perhaps all you need - close the game, and then pull up the hardware monitor.
Record the MAX core clock and gpu voltage, and open Afterburner's Curve Editor. You will then be presented with your gpu's voltage/frequency curve.
Take the gpu voltage number you recorded earlier and subtract 0.05v from it. Find the new value - or the one closest to it - in one of the points on the V/F curve, and click on it.
Use the up arrow key and raise the frequency until it matches the gpu core clock you recorded earlier, press the L key to lock it, and click the Apply button on the main HUD.
Congrats! You just applied the undervolt.
Save the profile in one of Afterburner's numbered slots for easy access later.
Now when you are about to play, open Afterburner, click the profile the undervolt was saved under, click Apply and play away. When done, click the reset button and close Afterburner.
Wow, that's a huge explanation, Thanks!
 

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