[SOLVED] Should I opt for Gigabit Powerline adapter or keep using 5Ghz Wifi?

pipirupi123

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Jun 21, 2014
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My current network setup is Modem+Router--[via CAT6]-->Access Point --[via 5Ghz Wifi]--> Desktop, the signal strength is Full but sometimes dips down to 3 out of 4 Bars. I've been thinking about using a Gigabit Powerline adapter (specifically this one from TP-Link ) to allow my Desktop to connect via Ethernet instead of Wifi (the network layout would be Modem+Router--[via CAT6]--> Access Point--[via CAT6]--> Gigabit Powerline Adapter Transmitter--[via Powerline ]--> Gigabit Powerline Adapter Receiver--[via CAT6]--> Desktop. Would using a Gigabit Powerline adapter be better in my situation or should I stick to my 5ghz Wifi connection since I get 3 of 4 to Full signal anyway?
 
Performance of Powerline really depends on your wiring. You may have electrically noisy appliances that drop the connection when they switch on or off. The two outlets you try to connect may be on different phases (two different out-of-phase 110v lines to make 220v) so you may need something called a phase coupler to even get it to work. "Gigabit" Powerline typically maxes out at 300Mbps and I've seen latency far worse than Wifi on Powerline before.

Wifi of course has its own issues, most notably with interference, but the present design of Wireless-AC does not minimize latency and the cures for bufferbloat on ethernet do not work at all on it. 802.11ax is finally arriving this year and promises 75% lower latency.

Wired ethernet is by far the most reliable and lowest-latency solution. If you own your house then it only takes two holes in outer walls to install jacks. Even if you don't, there are flat ethernet cords that can be run under carpets or out of windows.
 
It all depends on what your actual issue is.

The amount of bandwidth you get can not actually be predicted since the details of you house like how it is built and the location of devices make huge differences.

In general wifi will have more bandwidth in a perfect condition but again it depends on what nic cards you have and what router etc. Both ends for example must have 4 antenna to use 4x4 mimo.

The main advantage powerline has it is less susceptible to interference since it is only device directly connected to the house electrical that can have issues unlike wifi where it can be the neighbors router. People who play online games tend to favor powerline because it gets much less lag spikes in the games.

Another consideration is your internet speed. If you can get the speed you purchase with your current installation you can not go faster other than to pay the ISP more money for a better connection.
 
Performance of Powerline really depends on your wiring. You may have electrically noisy appliances that drop the connection when they switch on or off. The two outlets you try to connect may be on different phases (two different out-of-phase 110v lines to make 220v) so you may need something called a phase coupler to even get it to work. "Gigabit" Powerline typically maxes out at 300Mbps and I've seen latency far worse than Wifi on Powerline before.

Wifi of course has its own issues, most notably with interference, but the present design of Wireless-AC does not minimize latency and the cures for bufferbloat on ethernet do not work at all on it. 802.11ax is finally arriving this year and promises 75% lower latency.

Wired ethernet is by far the most reliable and lowest-latency solution. If you own your house then it only takes two holes in outer walls to install jacks. Even if you don't, there are flat ethernet cords that can be run under carpets or out of windows.
 
Am in the school of don't fix if ain't broke.

Powerline is not necessarily better, depends on the quality of your electrical wirings, your environment, and whether plugs on are on same of different electrical phase.

3-4 bars nice but what I wanna know is, am I getting buffering stuttering during video streaming? am I being dumb down to SD resolution due to insufficient bandwidth etc... u know actual complaints.
 

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