Question To which GPU could I upgrade with my current specs?

Jun 6, 2019
13
0
10
0
I have an Acer Predator G3620 desktop PC that used to be great but nowadays it's lacking. I'm looking to upgrade it though so I can run games super smoothly again.

I haven't changed anything since I bought it except upgraded my 2 x 4GB DDR3 RAM to 3 x 4 GB.

My current GPU is a AMD Radeon HD 7700 Series 2GB. I think it's kinda curious Acer put together a Radeon GPU with an intel processor (i7 3770). I've always had friends frown upon that combo, so now I'm thinking about getting rid of the Radeon GPU and getting a proper GTX in there. However, I'm not an expert on upgrading PCs and want to make sure that I make the most efficient upgrade that I can.

I've just recently done some research on my motherboard and I've read that since it being a brand motherboard it has little room for upgrades. The GPU interface seems to be PCIe v2.x with:
3 x PCIe 2.0 x1
and 1 x PCIe 2.0 x16 Expansion Slots.
What are my best options? I'm planning on filling up my fourth RAM slot with another 4GB DDR3 (=16GB total) stick once I upgrade my GPU.
Thanks!
 
I think you can go up to a GTX 1070 comfortably with that CPU and even a GTX 1080....that might be pushing it a little but I'm running a 1080 on a rig with an i7-980 which is slower than the 3770....and I get a "little bit" held back.....but not much.

You will see a HUGE improvement over the HD 7700.

The thing is....whatever you decide to get....make sure your PSU has enough wattage and the proper power plugs.
 
Reactions: Arne.V

Wendigo

Distinguished
Nov 26, 2002
111
23
18,585
0
As others said, it depends on the PSU (and also your budget!). That said, the HD7700 consumes less than 100W. So, based on this, your best bet is a GTX 1650, which should run fine with your actual PSU (if it's good enough for a HD7700, it should also be for a GTX 1650). But depending on the PSU, other options might be better, the GTX 1650 being only a safe bet.
 
Reactions: Arne.V
Just because of the PSU your pre-build system has might be on a tight power budget already, you should go to a GTX1060 6GB at best, unless you're willing to change the PSU as well. This is only because of power concerns. I've read it can hold up to a 1070 even, but I'm not 100% sure that could be entirely true. A GTX1660 could work as well?

Cheers!
 
Reactions: geofelt and Arne.V
Jun 6, 2019
13
0
10
0
I think you can go up to a GTX 1070 comfortably with that CPU and even a GTX 1080....that might be pushing it a little but I'm running a 1080 on a rig with an i7-980 which is slower than the 3770....and I get a "little bit" held back.....but not much.

You will see a HUGE improvement over the HD 7700.

The thing is....whatever you decide to get....make sure your PSU has enough wattage and the proper power plugs.
I have a 500W psu, will that be able to power a gtx 1070?
 
Jun 6, 2019
13
0
10
0
Just because of the PSU your pre-build system has might be on a tight power budget already, you should go to a GTX1060 6GB at best, unless you're willing to change the PSU as well. This is only because of power concerns. I've read it can hold up to a 1070 even, but I'm not 100% sure that could be entirely true. A GTX1660 could work as well?

Cheers!
My psu supplies 500W, what do you expect I have room for with that wattage?
 
Jun 6, 2019
13
0
10
0
My psu supplies 500W, what do you expect I have room for with that wattage?
Also I'm not too worried about the costs as long as I don't have to upgrade anything aside from the GPU and a little bit of extra RAM, because I expect the GPU's that my PC would be able to handle aren't overly pricey. Also judging from what I've seen online.
 

My psu seems to be 500W.
My display is a full HD (1080p) LED monitor.
What are your thoughts?
My thoughts is that you are borderline with that PSU for a 1070.
Plus I don't think that manufacturer is considered a quality manufacturer....which may add to the issue.
If it were me and I went with the 1070 I would go with something like a Corsair RMx series or a Seasonic....600 watts or more.
 
Reactions: Arne.V
Jun 6, 2019
13
0
10
0
My thoughts is that you are borderline with that PSU for a 1070.
Plus I don't think that manufacturer is considered a quality manufacturer....which may add to the issue.
If it were me and I went with the 1070 I would go with something like a Corsair RMx series or a Seasonic....600 watts or more.
Say I don't replace my PSU, what do you suppose it could handle? Otherwise I would consider the RM650x, doesn't seem too price but still I would prefer to just upgrade the GPU because I'm kinda anxious about installing a new PSU and it is still an extra €100+...
 
Say I don't replace my PSU, what do you suppose it could handle? Otherwise I would consider the RM650x, doesn't seem too price but still I would prefer to just upgrade the GPU because I'm kinda anxious about installing a new PSU and it is still an extra €100+...
Just an FYI.....installing a PSU is very easy.

I think....with your current PSU....a GTX 1060 would be what I'd pick.
I think a 1660 Ti might be too much GPU for you CPU.
 
Reactions: Arne.V
Jun 6, 2019
13
0
10
0
Just an FYI.....installing a PSU is very easy.

I think....with your current PSU....a GTX 1060 would be what I'd pick.
I think a 1660 Ti might be too much GPU for you CPU.
Haha ok, I just find all the cables intimidating, I'll take your word for it then. Thank you so much for the advice, and have a nice day!
 
My limited research shows your psu to be a server psu.
What pcie aux 6 and/or 8 pin connectors does it have?
Let that be your guide as to what graphics cards you can attach.
Here is a list of suggested requirements for a large variety of graphics cards:
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm

I would be leery of trying any card that needs adapters.
I might be thinking along the lines of a GTX1060 6gb.

Do not worry about pcie 2/3, they are forward and backwards compatible.
Any performance difference is minor.

And... I think you were lucky to get 12gb to run.
Ram must be matched, and adding a 4th disparate stick is not 100 % likely to not work.
If you want 16gb, buy a 2 x 8gb kit and sell the old ram.
 
Jun 6, 2019
13
0
10
0
My limited research shows your psu to be a server psu.
What pcie aux 6 and/or 8 pin connectors does it have?
Let that be your guide as to what graphics cards you can attach.
Here is a list of suggested requirements for a large variety of graphics cards:
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm

I would be leery of trying any card that needs adapters.
I might be thinking along the lines of a GTX1060 6gb.

Do not worry about pcie 2/3, they are forward and backwards compatible.
Any performance difference is minor.

And... I think you were lucky to get 12gb to run.
Ram must be matched, and adding a 4th disparate stick is not 100 % likely to not work.
If you want 16gb, buy a 2 x 8gb kit and sell the old ram.
The RAM I added was the exact same model as the two pieces that were already in there tho, how would that give problems? I've never had anyone say that 4x 4GB would be bad 🤔.

I think the psu you found was a very similar one as the one I have. Mine is used by acer and it seems to have different dimensions but the specs seem the same.

I'll keep the connectors in mind when I pick a GPU, 1060 seems to be the go to judging by most people's advice so thats probably gonna be it unless I decide I wanna pay extra for a new psu.

And can you tell me some more about the problems you think I might have with the RAM? It used to be 2 sticks of 4GB DDR3 (1600MHz) and now it's three of those, same brand and model even. Planning on making it four of the same when i put a new GPU in there, is there a big difference between 4 x 4GB & 2 x 8GB?
 
While the specs and even the part numbers are the same, the ram is not identical.
Ram is sold in kits for a reason.
A motherboard must manage all the ram using the same specs of voltage, cas and speed.
The internal workings are designed for the capacity of the kit.
Ram from the same vendor and part number can be made up of differing manufacturing components over time.
Some motherboards, can be very sensitive to this.
This is more difficult when more sticks are involved.
That is why ram vendors will NOT support ram that is not bought in one kit.

Intel runs dual channel.
With your 3 x 4gb setup, a pair of 4gb sticks will run in dual channel mode, and the odd 4gb will run in slower single channel mode.
This is called flex mode.
If you were successful with a 4 x 4gb setup, it will operate only in dual channel mode, exactly what a 2 x 16gb kit would do.

Intel seems to be tolerant of mismatched ram so I think your odds of adding another 4gb stick are relatively good. Perhaps 85%??

The question you might ask is what to do if the new stick does not play nice?
Can you return the new stick?
Stick with 12gb?

One option might be to buy a 2 x 8gb kit with the same specs as what you have.
You will be guaranteed 16gb.

Then, try to add in two of your old sticks.
If successful, great, you now are working with 24gb.
If not, sell the old sticks or keep them as spares.
 
Reactions: Arne.V
Jun 6, 2019
13
0
10
0
While the specs and even the part numbers are the same, the ram is not identical.
Ram is sold in kits for a reason.
A motherboard must manage all the ram using the same specs of voltage, cas and speed.
The internal workings are designed for the capacity of the kit.
Ram from the same vendor and part number can be made up of differing manufacturing components over time.
Some motherboards, can be very sensitive to this.
This is more difficult when more sticks are involved.
That is why ram vendors will NOT support ram that is not bought in one kit.

Intel runs dual channel.
With your 3 x 4gb setup, a pair of 4gb sticks will run in dual channel mode, and the odd 4gb will run in slower single channel mode.
This is called flex mode.
If you were successful with a 4 x 4gb setup, it will operate only in dual channel mode, exactly what a 2 x 16gb kit would do.

Intel seems to be tolerant of mismatched ram so I think your odds of adding another 4gb stick are relatively good. Perhaps 85%??

The question you might ask is what to do if the new stick does not play nice?
Can you return the new stick?
Stick with 12gb?

One option might be to buy a 2 x 8gb kit with the same specs as what you have.
You will be guaranteed 16gb.

Then, try to add in two of your old sticks.
If successful, great, you now are working with 24gb.
If not, sell the old sticks or keep them as spares.
I honestly had no idea RAM had to be that identical, I even read a bunch of articles on adding extra RAM and it never said anything about it. Thanks so much for telling me, I'm learning more every day haha.

I'm probably still going to opt for another 4GB, it'll save me some expenses. 16GB is the maximum amount that my system can support however so upgrading beyond the 2 x 8GB is definitely not gonna be a great idea.
 

stefanos50

Notable
May 12, 2019
499
121
940
105

My psu seems to be 500W.
My display is a full HD (1080p) LED monitor.
What are your thoughts?
Then go with gtx 1660 or gtx 1660 ti depends on the money you want to spend. Both will work great with 1080p monitor. 1060ti might have a bit of bottleneck with your cpu so 1660 seems a better choice if you wont upgrade your cpu anytime soon.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS