[SOLVED] Which CPU should I get, the Ryzen 7 2700 or the 2700x?

Joeseph Orlando

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At first I wanted to get the 2700x, until I saw the TDP. I'm worried about high temps as well as high electric bills. :/ So then I thought I'd get the 2700, buuut it seems pretty silly since I can get way more performance for just an extra 20-30$ more. But again, I'm worried about the temps and bills. Any advice? I'm also not planning to overclock, nor install an aftermarket cooler. I'm planning to run it at stock speed with stock cooler.

Also, these are my current system specs, some of which I'll be using in the new Ryzen build.

i7 4790k

GTX 1070 (will be transferred to new build)

8GB DDR3 RAM (My 16GB Corsair Vengeance just failed on me for the second time! Hope I can RMA it again and I'll never buy another Corsair product as long as I live!)

EVGA 750w SuperNova G2 (Will be transferred to new build also)

1x SSD
2x HDDs - 1x 4TB (For games) 1x 500GB (For storage such as pictures, videos, media, backup drive etc. I had it lying around so why not use it to save some extra space for games?)
1x Optical drive (Yes, I still use one in 2019 XD)

*All storage drives and optical drive will be transferred to the new build as well.



Not sure if any of this information is necessary, but it's there in case anyone asks. Anyway, any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Also, please don't tell me to just "get a 3000 series!" It's tempting but I really don't want to spend that much right now. Although I may get a mobo that supports it after a bios update in case I want to upgrade in the future. :p
 
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Interesting...and this is only for X processors? Thing is, I'm worried about high temps.
so i have the 2700 standart on game mode wich boosts clock speed to 3.7 ghz with stock cooler and while hardcore gaming for 5 hrs it doesnt go above 62 C wich is amazing so i advice u to take the 2700 standart
 

OllympianGamer

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I'm not sure where you live but a 55w difference shouldn't make a massive impact on your bill, at least it wouldn't over here in England. kWh costs about 14p so if I were to have have that cpu on for 10 hours every single day at load for an entire year the bill would only increase by £28.
 
Don't confuse TDP and electrical power requirements/power usage. Although TDP is (intentionally) higher, electrical power consumption is same at same frequency.
For all practical purposes, TDP is maximum amount of heat a device could produce without throttling down usefull only to choose a cooler for it.
 

Giannis_Mag

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If you are neither planning on an aftermarket cooler nor overclock you should go for the standard 2700. The x version is a higher frequency and more overclock capable cpu. It will run hotter. (I also think the x version doesnt include a a stock cooler)
 

Joeseph Orlando

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If you are neither planning on an aftermarket cooler nor overclock you should go for the standard 2700. The x version is a higher frequency and more overclock capable cpu. It will run hotter. (I also think the x version doesnt include a a stock cooler)
Actually both come with a cooler. The 2700x comes with a Wraith Prism and the 2700 comes with a Wraith Spire. But will it run hotter even at stock speed?
 

Joeseph Orlando

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Don't confuse TDP and electrical power requirements/power usage. Although TDP is (intentionally) higher, electrical power consumption is same at same frequency.
For all practical purposes, TDP is maximum amount of heat a device could produce without throttling down usefull only to choose a cooler for it.
Noted. Thanks! Now, what about temperature? Will the 2700x run hotter than the 2700 at stock speed? I can't seem to find any comparison in temperatures anywhere online. Unless I'm just not looking hard enough. :unsure:
 

RodroX

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Of course the Ryzen 2700X will run hotter, it has a higher base (stock) and boost frecuency. At stock you haver a 500MHz diference.

Either of this will be a good purchase. If you don't mind doing a bit of overclocking then get the Ryzen 2700 and a decent cooler from noctua, arctic, bequiet, deepcool, cooler master, etc and just overclock that non-x one a bit to be near the performance of the 2700X.

If you don't like to overclock, you want the best performance out of the box, and your gona use it for gaming the Ryzen 3600 is also a very, very good choice, and is going to give you a bit more FPS: https://www.gamersnexus.net/hwreviews/3489-amd-ryzen-5-3600-cpu-review-benchmarks-vs-intel.

As of CPU TDP is just some stupid unit/measure that doesn't quit make much sence to start with, and it doesn't mean the same thing on Intel and AMD. As CountMike explainned it can be used to desing or choose a cooler solution for x cpu when used at stock condition under special temps conditions, its all explainned here, the best way the autor could:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tL1F-qliSUk
.

Most AMD cpu perform better at lower temps, so an aftermarket cooler at some point is a welcome addition: https://www.arctic.ac/worldwide_en/freezer-34-esports-duo.html or https://noctua.at/en/products/cpu-cooler-retail/nh-u12s-chromax-black (some of the many examples).

Cheers
 
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Joeseph Orlando

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Of course the Ryzen 2700X will run hotter, it has a higher base (stock) and boost frecuency. At stock you haver a 500MHz diference.

Either of this will be a good purchase. If you don't mind doing a bit of overclocking then get the Ryzen 2700 and a decent cooler from noctua, arctic, bequiet, deepcool, cooler master, etc and just overclock that non-x one a bit to be near the performance of the 2700X.

If you don't like to overclock, you want the best performance out of the box, and your gona use it for gaming the Ryzen 3600 is also a very, very good choice, and is going to give you a bit more FPS: https://www.gamersnexus.net/hwreviews/3489-amd-ryzen-5-3600-cpu-review-benchmarks-vs-intel.

As of CPU TDP is just some stupid unit/measure that doesn't quit make much sence to start with, and it doesn't mean the same thing on Intel and AMD. As CountMike explainned it can be used to desing or choose a cooler solution for x cpu when used at stock condition under special temps conditions, its all explainned here, the best way the autor could:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tL1F-qliSUk
.

Most AMD cpu perform better at lower temps, so an aftermarket cooler at some point is a welcome addition: https://www.arctic.ac/worldwide_en/freezer-34-esports-duo.html or https://noctua.at/en/products/cpu-cooler-retail/nh-u12s-chromax-black (some of the many examples).

Cheers
Okay, thank you for the response, but as I said in my OP I don't want a 3000 series. This is the build I have in mind. https://pcpartpicker.com/list/MdBNQq The 3600 you recommended would require a BIOS update. Not to mention it only has 6 cores as apposed to 8, plus this build is slightly cheaper. As I also mentioned in my OP, I'm not planning to overclock either. I also don't want to spend extra money on a cooler. My set budget is $400.
 

RodroX

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Okay, thank you for the response, but as I said in my OP I don't want a 3000 series. This is the build I have in mind. https://pcpartpicker.com/list/MdBNQq The 3600 you recommended would require a BIOS update. Not to mention it only has 6 cores as apposed to 8, plus this build is slightly cheaper. As I also mentioned in my OP, I'm not planning to overclock either. I also don't want to spend extra money on a cooler. My set budget is $400.
I read your OP, but even if you said you don't want a 3000 series, keep in mind that the Ryzen 2700X may require, eventually, a BIOS update too. AMD (like Intel) and motherboard vendors work together to fix bugs and/or add new functionality, and often you need to update your BIOS to get those goodies in place. But yeah, the Ryzen 2xxx should work out of the box on any B45 or X470 mobo.

Also I know the 2700/X have 8 cores but even so, if you are not streaming or doing some heavy threaded workload the 3600 still a very good option agaisnt the 2700X (similar price). Now if you want the cheapest option the 2700 is good enough.

Well I hope you find the stock cooler good enough for your needs (Whatever CPU you buy). I didn't, so I got an aftermarket cooler, way more quiet than the stock one and a huge diference in cooling performance / CPU performance (as I wrote on my previous post, Ryzen works better-more performance on low temps).
 

Joeseph Orlando

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I read your OP, but even if you said you don't want a 3000 series, keep in mind that the Ryzen 2700X may require, eventually, a BIOS update too. AMD (like Intel) and motherboard vendors work together to fix bugs and/or add new functionality, and often you need to update your BIOS to get those goodies in place. But yeah, the Ryzen 2xxx should work out of the box on any B45 or X470 mobo.

Also I know the 2700/X have 8 cores but even so, if you are not streaming or doing some heavy threaded workload the 3600 still a very good option agaisnt the 2700X (similar price). Now if you want the cheapest option the 2700 is good enough.

Well I hope you find the stock cooler good enough for your needs (Whatever CPU you buy). I didn't, so I got an aftermarket cooler, way more quiet than the stock one and a huge diference in cooling performance / CPU performance (as I wrote on my previous post, Ryzen works better-more performance on low temps).
Yeah I know, the prices are similar. However, when I added them to the parts list on PCPartPicker, it had a compatibility mismatch with virtually every motherboard. Even if I need a BIOS update for the 2700 for new features and such, that's fine. At least it'll work straight away. Where as with the 3600, I'll probably need a CPU to get the damn thing to turn on in order to update the BIOS to make it compatible for it! XD

Anyway, I'm thinking I may just go with the standard 2700. I've been looking at videos and there doesn't seem to be too much of a significant difference between the two in terms of gaming performance. Maybe a 30 fps difference or so. Not too big of a deal. Anyway thanks for your reply. :)
 
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Yeah I know, the prices are similar. However, when I added them to the parts list on PCPartPicker, it had a compatibility mismatch with virtually every motherboard. Even if I need a BIOS update for the 2700 for new features and such, that's fine. At least it'll work straight away. Where as with the 3600, I'll probably need a CPU to get the damn thing to turn on in order to update the BIOS to make it compatible for it! XD

Anyway, I'm thinking I may just go with the standard 2700. I've been looking at videos and there doesn't seem to be too much of a significant difference between the two in terms of gaming performance. Maybe a 30 fps difference or so. Not too big of a deal. Anyway thanks for your reply. :)
Which motherboards are you looking at to match them with? If you're looking at any motherboard with a 400-series chipset either 2700 or 2700x would be perfectly compatible out of the box, no BIOS update required.

HOWEVER... much has happened since the shipping BIOS was put on the board. I'd strongly suggest updating to the latest pre-Ryzen 3000 BIOS as soon as you can just to get the benefit of those enhancements.
 
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Get the 2700X. I bought this CPU recently and it has worked fine. It is not worth paying only around 20 dollars less for a lesser performing processor, so just go for the best. Also, the Wraith Prism cooler (comes with the 2700X only for 2000 series processors) is a very powerful cooler, and also features RGB! Buying the 2700 would result in you getting slightly worse performance out of the box at a higher temperature due to the worse stock cooler that ships with the CPU. Because you aren't planning to overclock, you should just go for the overall superior performance and temperatures of the 2700X with its stock cooler.
 

Joeseph Orlando

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Get the 2700X. I bought this CPU recently and it has worked fine. It is not worth paying only around 20 dollars less for a lesser performing processor, so just go for the best. Also, the Wraith Prism cooler (comes with the 2700X only for 2000 series processors) is a very powerful cooler, and also features RGB! Buying the 2700 would result in you getting slightly worse performance out of the box at a higher temperature due to the worse stock cooler that ships with the CPU. Because you aren't planning to overclock, you should just go for the overall superior performance and temperatures of the 2700X with its stock cooler.
Really? Because I was watching this video here,
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wa7bK06wT4I
and the temps on the 2700 are much lower than the 2700x. :unsure:
 

Joeseph Orlando

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Which motherboards are you looking at to match them with? If you're looking at any motherboard with a 400-series chipset either 2700 or 2700x would be perfectly compatible out of the box, no BIOS update required.

HOWEVER... much has happened since the shipping BIOS was put on the board. I'd strongly suggest updating to the latest pre-Ryzen 3000 BIOS as soon as you can just to get the benefit of those enhancements.
This is the build I had in mind. https://pcpartpicker.com/list/MdBNQq After looking at mobo's within my price-range I've settled on the ASRock B450M PRO4. Seems to be a decent board for what I need.
 
Thanks man! Now...which CPU has lower temps under full load? XD
2700x CPU's can (and do) boost to higher clocks. All else equal, higher clocks means higher temperature. It's really very simple...except it's not really that simple.

For instance, if you ever decide to attempt overclocking to eke more processing power out of it is where it changes a lot. You really have to manual all-core overclock a 2700, so it will be FIXED at the higher clock speed and producing more heat constantly. Not a whole lot more, but still yet more.

But a 2700x can be much more effectively PBO'd...a method of overclocking that coaxes the CPU to boost to higher clocks and stay their longer. It only does that when processing a task though as at idle it backs and cools off a bit more.

Also, 2700x's are binned to be cooler running and require lower voltages. In theory, they SHOULD run cooler then, all else equal.

But which will actually run cooler in your system and under your workload is probably unpredictable and at any rate not going to matter much at all. I'd not worry that point, just worry how you're going to put all the processing power you'll find yourself with to good use.
 

Joeseph Orlando

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2700x CPU's can (and do) boost to higher clocks. All else equal, higher clocks means higher temperature. It's really very simple...except it's not really that simple.

For instance, if you ever decide to attempt overclocking to eke more processing power out of it is where it changes a lot. You really have to manual all-core overclock a 2700, so it will be FIXED at the higher clock speed and producing more heat constantly. Not a whole lot more, but still yet more.

But a 2700x can be much more effectively PBO'd...a method of overclocking that coaxes the CPU to boost to higher clocks and stay their longer. It only does that when processing a task though as at idle it backs and cools off a bit more.

Also, 2700x's are binned to be cooler running and require lower voltages. In theory, they SHOULD run cooler then, all else equal.

But which will actually run cooler in your system and under your workload is probably unpredictable and at any rate not going to matter much at all. I'd not worry that point, just worry how you're going to put all the processing power you'll find yourself with to good use.
Based on this video
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wa7bK06wT4I
I think I'll go with the 2700. The temps are significantly lower with not much difference in frame rate.
 
Based on this video
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wa7bK06wT4I
I think I'll go with the 2700. The temps are significantly lower with not much difference in frame rate.
I'd not put much credence in tests like that since they are rarely repeatable. But I have to agree it can make some sense because a 2700 isn't going to hit as high a clock as a 2700x in a properly optimized system.

But that's just it, it's not hitting as high a clock. In a CPU bottle-necked game I'd have to think hitting the high clocks would be preferable. But if lower temperature (however small it may be) is your decision point then that's where you are.

You might also consider a 2600 or even 2600x, with fewer cores and threads to heat things up. They make good sense for games since 6 cores/12 threads are still the optimum for them.
 

Joeseph Orlando

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I'd not put much credence in tests like that since they are rarely repeatable. But I have to agree it can make some sense because a 2700 isn't going to hit as high a clock as a 2700x in a properly optimized system.

But that's just it, it's not hitting as high a clock. In a CPU bottle-necked game I'd have to think hitting the high clocks would be preferable. But if lower temperature (however small it may be) is your decision point then that's where you are.

You might also consider a 2600 or even 2600x, with fewer cores and threads to heat things up. They make good sense for games since 6 cores/12 threads are still the optimum for them.
Yeah but it's not really a high clock speed anyway. The base clock on the 2700x is 500mhz higher and the boost clock is only 200mhz higher. That really doesn't seem like a significant difference imo. Plus the frame rate in the video I linked don't seem to be too far off. As for the 2600, eh. I dunno...kinda wanted a Ryzen 7. Besides I'd rather have the two extra cores because, why not? :p
 
Ryzen "X" processors have an advantage of being "Fire and forget", you set them properly with PBO engaged and with set Balanced power plan in windows, they will adjust their frequency, voltage and heat with settings that meet demand at any time while overclocked non-x will always stay at same settings no matter what and with that all that comes with it, voltage heat, power consumption.....
Oc is practically limited to what particular CPU can achieve at it's full boost or maybe even less for full stability, that way you would actually get some lower single thread performance than if left on PBO.
 
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Joeseph Orlando

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Ryzen "X" processors have an advantage of being "Fire and forget", you set them properly with PBO engaged and with set Balanced power plan in windows, they will adjust their frequency, voltage and heat with settings that meet demand at any time while overclocked non-x will always stay at same settings no matter what and with that all that comes with it, voltage heat, power consumption.....
Oc is practically limited to what particular CPU can achieve at it's full boost or maybe even less for full stability, that way you would actually get some lower single thread performance than if left on PBO.
What's PBO??
 

RodroX

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PBO stands for Precision Boost Overdrive, when enable it basically allows your CPU to go beyond stock specificacion as long as some headroom criteria are met (mainly power delivering from motherboard and psu and enough cooling headroom).

Is basically an AMD embeded OC feature.
 

Joeseph Orlando

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PBO stands for Precision Boost Overdrive, when enable it basically allows your CPU to go beyond stock specificacion as long as some headroom criteria are met (mainly power delivering from motherboard and psu and enough cooling headroom).

Is basically an AMD embeded OC feature.
Interesting...and this is only for X processors? Thing is, I'm worried about high temps.
 
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Interesting...and this is only for X processors? Thing is, I'm worried about high temps.
so i have the 2700 standart on game mode wich boosts clock speed to 3.7 ghz with stock cooler and while hardcore gaming for 5 hrs it doesnt go above 62 C wich is amazing so i advice u to take the 2700 standart
 

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