[SOLVED] Bypassing Wireless router

PatheticGamer

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Feb 27, 2016
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Hey guys, got a question. My ISP upgraded the bandwidth to 250 mbps. Currently my ethernet cable runs through wireless router to provide wi-fi for mobile devices and my pc is connected to router via LAN port on router. The problem is - these LAN ports are 100mbps max bandwidth. I was thinking about gigabit network switch, connecting it to the ethernet cable, then connecting one lan cable to router and the second one to pc, so that I get above 100 mbps on my pc. Is my idea correct or the network switch is for other purposes?
Thanks in advance
 

RealBeast

Titan
Moderator
Hey guys, got a question. My ISP upgraded the bandwidth to 250 mbps. Currently my ethernet cable runs through wireless router to provide wi-fi for mobile devices and my pc is connected to router via LAN port on router. The problem is - these LAN ports are 100mbps max bandwidth. I was thinking about gigabit network switch, connecting it to the ethernet cable, then connecting one lan cable to router and the second one to pc, so that I get above 100 mbps on my pc. Is my idea correct or the network switch is for other purposes?
Thanks in advance
Nope, your ISP gives you one address. You cannot put a switch in front of the router and expect to use more than one device. The switch comes after the router to an LAN port to give you more wired connections. Just buy a new router with gigabit ports.

Depending on your budget -- if very tight use a TP-Link Archer C7, if you can afford a little more go with a Netgear R7000 or ASUS RT-68.
 

RealBeast

Titan
Moderator
Hey guys, got a question. My ISP upgraded the bandwidth to 250 mbps. Currently my ethernet cable runs through wireless router to provide wi-fi for mobile devices and my pc is connected to router via LAN port on router. The problem is - these LAN ports are 100mbps max bandwidth. I was thinking about gigabit network switch, connecting it to the ethernet cable, then connecting one lan cable to router and the second one to pc, so that I get above 100 mbps on my pc. Is my idea correct or the network switch is for other purposes?
Thanks in advance
Nope, your ISP gives you one address. You cannot put a switch in front of the router and expect to use more than one device. The switch comes after the router to an LAN port to give you more wired connections. Just buy a new router with gigabit ports.

Depending on your budget -- if very tight use a TP-Link Archer C7, if you can afford a little more go with a Netgear R7000 or ASUS RT-68.
 

Barty1884

Retired Moderator
Your ISP provide >100mbps service, yet a router with ports limited to 10/100? That doesn't seem right.

Is this a combo modem/router? If so, even buying your own router will still need to see the ISP provided modem/router in bridge mode & passed through - ie still bound by 10/100.

I'd reach out to the ISP first of all, chances are they have an upgraded router available to you if they're offering speeds >100.
 

PatheticGamer

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Feb 27, 2016
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Nope, your ISP gives you one address. You cannot put a switch in front of the router and expect to use more than one device. The switch comes after the router to an LAN port to give you more wired connections. Just buy a new router with gigabit ports.
Well that sucks:D Cheapest one is 45 euros with gigabit lan
 

PatheticGamer

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Feb 27, 2016
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Your ISP provide >100mbps service, yet a router with ports limited to 10/100? That doesn't seem right.

Is this a combo modem/router? If so, even buying your own router will still need to see the ISP provided modem/router in bridge mode & passed through - ie still bound by 10/100.

I'd reach out to the ISP first of all, chances are they have an upgraded router available to you if they're offering speeds >100.
No, I checked by connecting ethernet cable directly to pc. I'm living in residential, the cable just goes into my apartment, probably there is a modem or something somewhere outside, still I don't know much about networks and stuff.
EDIT: connected directly to pc speedtest.net shows 250 mbps download and 400+ upload
 

RealBeast

Titan
Moderator
No, I checked by connecting ethernet cable directly to pc. I'm living in residential, the cable just goes into my apartment, probably there is a modem or something somewhere outside, still I don't know much about networks and stuff.
EDIT: connected directly to pc speedtest.net shows 250 mbps download and 400+ upload
That means that your modem is capable, probably DOCSIS 3.0. Older routers did not anticipate the need for gigabit LAN ports or WAN port.

edit: I went through this about 6 months ago when I had to buy a DOCSIS 3.1 modem for $150 to get my full download speed since my ISP required a 32 x 8 (download x upload channels).
 

PatheticGamer

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Feb 27, 2016
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That means that your modem is capable, probably DOCSIS 3.0. Older routers did not anticipate the need for gigabit LAN ports or WAN port.
Guess so, our ISP provides 1Gbps aswell, and can upgrade bandwidth in a matter of seconds, just have to pay:D Thanks for answer to my question!
 

PatheticGamer

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Feb 27, 2016
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Nope, your ISP gives you one address. You cannot put a switch in front of the router and expect to use more than one device. The switch comes after the router to an LAN port to give you more wired connections. Just buy a new router with gigabit ports.

Depending on your budget -- if very tight use a TP-Link Archer C7, if you can afford a little more go with a Netgear R7000 or ASUS RT-68.
Saw your edit just now, I was thinking about Archer C6, C7 is 30 extra euros. After reading specs it seems like it has 4x gigabit lan ports
 

Barty1884

Retired Moderator
No, I checked by connecting ethernet cable directly to pc. I'm living in residential, the cable just goes into my apartment, probably there is a modem or something somewhere outside, still I don't know much about networks and stuff.
EDIT: connected directly to pc speedtest.net shows 250 mbps download and 400+ upload
So you just have an ethernet cable coming into your apartment? And bypassing your router, connecting direct... works?

If so, your 'router' isn't routing (that's happening in a common area?), it's an access point for wireless only, essentially.... If I'm understanding correctly.

In which case, you could put a gigabit switch before your access point... @RealBeast , are you interpreting differently?

This is an odd setup though, if you have your own service with an ISP, you should have your own modem etc.
 

PatheticGamer

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Feb 27, 2016
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So you just have an ethernet cable coming into your apartment? And bypassing your router, connecting direct... works?

If so, your 'router' isn't routing (that's happening in a common area?), it's an access point for wireless only, essentially.... If I'm understanding correctly.

In which case, you could put a gigabit switch before your access point...

This is an odd setup though, if you have your own service with an ISP, you should have your own
I just unpluged ethernet cable from router(EnGenius something), then connected it to PC, checked on speedtest it got those 250mbps, if I connect ethernet to wifi router, then connect a lan cable from router to pc I get 100 mbps in speedtest.net(means on wired connection). Strange thing is that if I run speedtest from my phone with wifi, it shows 50 mbps max, meaning 100mbps are just lost somewhere, even though it says in router specs that it provides 150mbps conneciton. Same 50 mbps I get if I unplug the lan-to-pc cable.
 

Barty1884

Retired Moderator
I just unpluged ethernet cable from router(EnGenius something), then connected it to PC, checked on speedtest it got those 250mbps, if I connect ethernet to wifi router, then connect a lan cable from router to pc I get 100 mbps in speedtest.net(means on wired connection). Strange thing is that if I run speedtest from my phone with wifi, it shows 50 mbps max, meaning 100mbps are just lost somewhere, even though it says in router specs that it provides 150mbps conneciton. Same 50 mbps I get if I unplug the lan-to-pc cable.
The EnGenius unit is likely either only an AccessPoint (to provide Wifi) OR it's a router configured to only be an access point.

If you can remove it from the setup entirely and still have a working wired connection, your routing is taking place elsewhere.

At which point, you could connect a gigabit switch before this AP, run cables directly to your PC for full speed & run a cable to the AP to maintain your Wifi.
 

PatheticGamer

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Feb 27, 2016
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The EnGenius unit is likely either only an AccessPoint (to provide Wifi) OR it's a router configured to only be an access point.

If you can remove it from the setup entirely and still have a working wired connection, your routing is taking place elsewhere.

At which point, you could connect a gigabit switch before this AP, run cables directly to your PC for full speed & run a cable to the AP to maintain your Wifi.
Well that is what I was thinking initially
 

RealBeast

Titan
Moderator
So you just have an ethernet cable coming into your apartment? And bypassing your router, connecting direct... works?

If so, your 'router' isn't routing (that's happening in a common area?), it's an access point for wireless only, essentially.... If I'm understanding correctly.

In which case, you could put a gigabit switch before your access point... @RealBeast , are you interpreting differently?

This is an odd setup though, if you have your own service with an ISP, you should have your own modem etc.
Unlikely that it is set up that way as it would be insecure without some kind of firewall. A managed switch with NAT capability could work but that is beyond the scope of the OP and quite a bit more costly.

Most apartments that have cable modem (and I lived in quite a few in the last 15 years as corporate housing while on jobs) had a convergence point where the WAN line came in and all of the LAN cables to the various rooms did too, pretty much like you would want if you were building a home and wanted wired connections to each room).

I expect that the installer that comes out will bring a cable modem to attach, which I would replace with a purchased model if allowed, since most charge $5 or more a month rental.

Engenius makes a ton of stuff, some consumer some SoHo, and they do make managed switches. Do you have a model number?
 

PatheticGamer

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Feb 27, 2016
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Unlikely that it is set up that way as it would be insecure without some kind of firewall. A managed switch with NAT capability could work but that is beyond the scope of the OP and quite a bit more costly.

Most apartments that have cable modem (and I lived in quite a few in the last 15 years as corporate housing while on jobs) had a convergence point where the WAN line came in and all of the LAN cables to the various rooms did too, pretty much like you would want if you were building a home and wanted wired connections to each room).

I expect that the installer that comes out will bring a cable modem to attach, which I would replace with a purchased model if allowed, since most charge $5 or more a month rental.

Engenius makes a ton of stuff, some consumer some SoHo, and they do make managed switches. Do you have a model number?
EnGenius ESR1221N
 

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