[SOLVED] Want to upgrade my computer, what cpu should i get?

TheRealBooBam

Commendable
Feb 17, 2019
11
2
1,515
0
I have a computer with a very old I7 2600 cpu, and i want to upgrade it meaning i have to get a new CPU, motherboard and ram.

I play games like, Escape from Tarkov, Rust, COD Warzone, GTA, league of legends etc etc...

Right now i currently use a GTX 1070 and in the future i plan on upgrading but i cant atm

I want to be able to play these games and stream them on either twitch or discord for example without having to worry about fps. Being able to edit videos etc would also be great!

I'm still saving money for this atm so the budget is very flexible, I'm willing to save for whatever.
 
I have a computer with a very old I7 2600 cpu, and i want to upgrade it meaning i have to get a new CPU, motherboard and ram.

I play games like, Escape from Tarkov, Rust, COD Warzone, GTA, league of legends etc etc...

Right now i currently use a GTX 1070 and in the future i plan on upgrading but i cant atm

I want to be able to play these games and stream them on either twitch or discord for example without having to worry about fps. Being able to edit videos etc would also be great!

I'm still saving money for this atm so the budget is very flexible, I'm willing to save for whatever.
It's tricky because prices are so high at the moment - although that said you have lots of last gen options that might be worth a look and probably are a bit easier to get hold of.

In terms of streaming, it somewhat depends on if you want to stream on the cpu or on the gpu, cpu streaming is often better quality although is more resource heavy whilst the gpu can usually handle the streaming in hardware with minimal impact on fps but the final quality is lower (I believe a 1070 should be able to do this).

If streaming on the gpu, then you probably don't need that many cores, 6 cores / 12 threads would be plenty. If you want to push for cpu streaming then you really need at least 8 cores to give your machine a bit more cpu headroom.

In terms of what to get, the very best gaming cpu right now is AMD Ryzen 5000 series (the 5600X and 5800X being the most sensible options for games). They are very hard to get hold of though. On the Intel side, the current 10000 series parts are still based on Intel's long in the tooth Skylake core (which originally launched with the 6000 series), they are a bit slower than the Ryzen 5000 series in games but it's not a massive margin so would still be a big upgrade from a 2600. The best options are the 10600 and 10700 series parts. Intel has a new series of cpu's due out soon that are based on their newer core designs used in laptops and should offer a decent bump in IPC, so expectations are they will at least match (or likely surpass) the Ryzen 5000 cpu's in games. The only issue is though that given current circumstances they are likely to be really hard to buy as well.

That then leave you with the previous generation parts from AMD and Intel - the Ryzen 3000 series (AMD skipped 4000 on the desktop) and intel 9000 series cpu's. On the AMD side they are on the same platform as the newer parts so you can get the same motherboard and potentially upgrade later, for Intel they changed to a new motherboard socket when they launched the 10000 lineup. That said the i9 9900K is a very potent gaming cpu and is essentially the same part as the 10700K so still very capable, the only downside to the 9000 series is on the lower models Intel disabled hyperthreading so whilst the 9900K is an 8 core 16 thread cpu, the i7 9700K is only 8 core, 8 thread which means it probably isn't ideal for cpu streaming and might not age as well. The Ryzen 3000 series are slightly slower than the 9000 / 10000 Intel parts in games (although still pretty good they don't hit the clock speeds Intel can) although you can get higher core count parts which would offer lots of headroom for cpu based streaming. The Ryzen 7 3700 (8C / 16T) and Ryzen 9 3900 (12C / 24T) series parts are worth looking at as whilst you might not hit quite as high max frame rates you do have loads of spare cores / threads for the streaming software.
 
Reactions: TheRealBooBam
I have a computer with a very old I7 2600 cpu, and i want to upgrade it meaning i have to get a new CPU, motherboard and ram.

I play games like, Escape from Tarkov, Rust, COD Warzone, GTA, league of legends etc etc...

Right now i currently use a GTX 1070 and in the future i plan on upgrading but i cant atm

I want to be able to play these games and stream them on either twitch or discord for example without having to worry about fps. Being able to edit videos etc would also be great!

I'm still saving money for this atm so the budget is very flexible, I'm willing to save for whatever.
It's tricky because prices are so high at the moment - although that said you have lots of last gen options that might be worth a look and probably are a bit easier to get hold of.

In terms of streaming, it somewhat depends on if you want to stream on the cpu or on the gpu, cpu streaming is often better quality although is more resource heavy whilst the gpu can usually handle the streaming in hardware with minimal impact on fps but the final quality is lower (I believe a 1070 should be able to do this).

If streaming on the gpu, then you probably don't need that many cores, 6 cores / 12 threads would be plenty. If you want to push for cpu streaming then you really need at least 8 cores to give your machine a bit more cpu headroom.

In terms of what to get, the very best gaming cpu right now is AMD Ryzen 5000 series (the 5600X and 5800X being the most sensible options for games). They are very hard to get hold of though. On the Intel side, the current 10000 series parts are still based on Intel's long in the tooth Skylake core (which originally launched with the 6000 series), they are a bit slower than the Ryzen 5000 series in games but it's not a massive margin so would still be a big upgrade from a 2600. The best options are the 10600 and 10700 series parts. Intel has a new series of cpu's due out soon that are based on their newer core designs used in laptops and should offer a decent bump in IPC, so expectations are they will at least match (or likely surpass) the Ryzen 5000 cpu's in games. The only issue is though that given current circumstances they are likely to be really hard to buy as well.

That then leave you with the previous generation parts from AMD and Intel - the Ryzen 3000 series (AMD skipped 4000 on the desktop) and intel 9000 series cpu's. On the AMD side they are on the same platform as the newer parts so you can get the same motherboard and potentially upgrade later, for Intel they changed to a new motherboard socket when they launched the 10000 lineup. That said the i9 9900K is a very potent gaming cpu and is essentially the same part as the 10700K so still very capable, the only downside to the 9000 series is on the lower models Intel disabled hyperthreading so whilst the 9900K is an 8 core 16 thread cpu, the i7 9700K is only 8 core, 8 thread which means it probably isn't ideal for cpu streaming and might not age as well. The Ryzen 3000 series are slightly slower than the 9000 / 10000 Intel parts in games (although still pretty good they don't hit the clock speeds Intel can) although you can get higher core count parts which would offer lots of headroom for cpu based streaming. The Ryzen 7 3700 (8C / 16T) and Ryzen 9 3900 (12C / 24T) series parts are worth looking at as whilst you might not hit quite as high max frame rates you do have loads of spare cores / threads for the streaming software.
 
Reactions: TheRealBooBam

ASK THE COMMUNITY