Jun 30, 2019
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Hey
I'm Building a PC Gaming
and trying to get the best with an average budget
I would love to get suggestions

Case: CiT Blaze Mid Tower Gaming Case - Black (Blue fans) CAS3347
MotherBoard: ASUS TUF Z370-Pro Gaming
CPU: Intel Core i7 - 8700K , 12M Cache, up to 4.60 GHz
SSD: samsung 860 pro MZ-76P512BW
GPU: MSI GeForce RTX 2060 Gaming, 6Go
Memory: HyperX Predator RGB 2x8GB DDR4 2933MHz CL15 Kit

Any Suggestion for
Processor Cooling, Power Supply
Also if I made any mistake choosing the wrong item
please let me know
thats my first time I build my own Gaming PC

Thank You
 
Last edited:
Welcome to the forums my friend!

  • Your motherboard and CPU are not compatible.
  • You'll want a good quality PSU. This will depend on budget, but don't cheap out on it. Anything by Seasonic will be good, usually the cheapest PSU that is worth buying is a Corsair CX - but there are still better quality units.
 
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Jun 30, 2019
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Welcome to the forums my friend!

  • Your motherboard and CPU are not compatible.
  • You'll want a good quality PSU. This will depend on budget, but don't cheap out on it. Anything by Seasonic will be good, usually the cheapest PSU that is worth buying is a Corsair CX - but there are still better quality units.
Can you help me with the motherboard and cpu thing?
by the way i changed my mind with the CPU to i7 8700k
and about PSU I sure will
 

parkour47

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Jul 22, 2011
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If you're building a brand new rig, purely for gaming, why not opt for Intel's latest generation? The 9700K will outperform the 8700K in most games, albeit marginally. The newer Z390 line of motherboards also have better VRM setups, meaning they can handle higher overclocks. Which I assume you intend to do, since you're buying an unlocked processor.

As for cooling, I personally like BE QUIET!'s Dark Rock 4 for the 8700K, or the Pro variant if you decide on the 9700K. Alternatively, you could step down to a 9600K and barely notice the 1-2 frames lost in most games. It depends on how long you plan to use these components, as 6 cores will eventually become a bottleneck.

Gigabyte and MSI motherboards have both overtaken ASUS (who used to be undisputed) in terms of quality and value. The TUF series has a few nice features but is overpriced and underbuilt compared to others. I think either the Gigabyte Aorus Elite or MSI Gaming Pro Carbon are better options.

EVGA make the best power supplies right now, but Corsair, SeaSonic, XFX and Cooler Master all make good options, too. 650W should be enough, unless you plan to upgrade the GPU or connect lots of drives and peripherals down the line.

Lastly, the differences between Samsung's 860 PRO and EVO SSDs are minimal. You're probably better off getting the EVO but electing for a 1TB drive, especially if that's your only storage. Some games are very large nowadays.

P.S. Welcome to the forums!
 
Reactions: Jone0us
Jun 30, 2019
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If you're building a brand new rig, purely for gaming, why not opt for Intel's latest generation? The 9700K will outperform the 8700K in most games, albeit marginally. The newer Z390 line of motherboards also have better VRM setups, meaning they can handle higher overclocks. Which I assume you intend to do, since you're buying an unlocked processor.

As for cooling, I personally like BE QUIET!'s Dark Rock 4 for the 8700K, or the Pro variant if you decide on the 9700K. Alternatively, you could step down to a 9600K and barely notice the 1-2 frames lost in most games. It depends on how long you plan to use these components, as 6 cores will eventually become a bottleneck.

Gigabyte and MSI motherboards have both overtaken ASUS (who used to be undisputed) in terms of quality and value. The TUF series has a few nice features but is overpriced and underbuilt compared to others. I think either the Gigabyte Aorus Elite or MSI Gaming Pro Carbon are better options.

EVGA make the best power supplies right now, but Corsair, SeaSonic, XFX and Cooler Master all make good options, too. 650W should be enough, unless you plan to upgrade the GPU or connect lots of drives and peripherals down the line.

Lastly, the differences between Samsung's 860 PRO and EVO SSDs are minimal. You're probably better off getting the EVO but electing for a 1TB drive, especially if that's your only storage. Some games are very large nowadays.

P.S. Welcome to the forums!
Okay, So now you changed my mind

I'm going for
CPU : intel core i7 9700k
SSD: Samsung 860 Evo 1TB MZ-76E1T0BW
GPU: MSI GeForce RTX 2060 Gaming ,6Go

and help me choose MotherBoard
Gigabyte Z390 Aorus Elite
or
MSI Z390 Gaming Pro Carbon

and also suggest 2x8GB Memory cards if you can
Thank you!
 

parkour47

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Jul 22, 2011
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The HyperX Predator memory you already had picked out is good. Not the cheapest, but decent quality. The best value RAM right now is probably Corsair Vengeance LPX, depending on where you look. Either should be very reliable.

As for choosing a motherboard, the Aorus Elite has better VRMs but the Gaming Pro Carbon has a nicer design. So it depends on how far you want to push the overclock. If you're pairing the 9700K with the Pro version of the CPU cooler I mentioned and want to eek out every last drop of performance, then I'd recommend the Gigabyte. Otherwise, the MSI UEFI BIOS is more user friendly and the board will match your graphics card. In every other aspect they are nearly identical. Both have good connectivity, excellent onboard sound, and support up to 128GB of RAM. Though, I don't expect any game in the next decade to require that much.
 

g-unit1111

Titan
Moderator
Welcome to the forums my friend!

  • Your motherboard and CPU are not compatible.
  • You'll want a good quality PSU. This will depend on budget, but don't cheap out on it. Anything by Seasonic will be good, usually the cheapest PSU that is worth buying is a Corsair CX - but there are still better quality units.
Uh........... what? A Z370 will work with an 8700K unless I'm missing something here. Having a Z390 will be better, but to say that a Z370 and 8700K aren't compatible is incorrect.

I would lose that case however - it's trash. Better would be to get something from Corsair, NZXT, Phanteks, or Fractal Design. I do also agree about the RAM - I'd get at least DDR4-3200 - G. Skill or Corsair.
 
Uh........... what? A Z370 will work with an 8700K unless I'm missing something here. Having a Z390 will be better, but to say that a Z370 and 8700K aren't compatible is incorrect.

I would lose that case however - it's trash. Better would be to get something from Corsair, NZXT, Phanteks, or Fractal Design. I do also agree about the RAM - I'd get at least DDR4-3200 - G. Skill or Corsair.
8700K wasn't the original CPU quoted my friend.
It was a previous gen quoted previously. Yes of course a 8700K is compatible!
 
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parkour47

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Jul 22, 2011
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I was just about to mention, yeah. The OP edited his original post after PC Tailor pointed out the CPU and motherboard discrepancy. He wasn't referring to the 8700K at the time.

Both the NZXT H500 and Fractal Design Meshify C are lovely cases to work in. The latter would be my personal choice but for a few dollars more. G.Skill RAM costs slightly more than Corsair, too, but they've built an honest reputation on quality and style. Right now, 3200MHz probably nets you the best bang for your buck on Intel systems.
 
Apr 2, 2019
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1. First thing is to choose a motherboard and case
1.1 Check the capability of the motherboard for CPU and RAM. You can't comit a mistake in this step bacause it happens to choose a memory stick that doesn't combine with the CPU so pay very attention to your motherboard catalog

2. PSU gotta be good as well. You need to see the amount of Wattage that your GPU needs. But for example, at NVIDIA website they usually recomend a PSU that all your system may need including thermo-eletric coolers, HDDs, SSDs and all the stuff. The secret is to get a good brand like suggested by the others.

3. Any other thing I belive as simple always be aware of the motherboard catalog
 

g-unit1111

Titan
Moderator
1. First thing is to choose a motherboard and case
1.1 Check the capability of the motherboard for CPU and RAM. You can't comit a mistake in this step bacause it happens to choose a memory stick that doesn't combine with the CPU so pay very attention to your motherboard catalog
This entire thing is absolutely wrong on every level. The first thing to do is determine a budget. That will determine what CPU and GPU you can afford. Then you can start planning the rest of your build from there. As far as RAM goes, there's no such thing as a "motherboard catalog". Motherboard manufacturers do have Qualified Vendor Lists (QVL) but they're not exactly a be-all end-all guide to figuring out what RAM works with your motherboard. They don't have the time and/or resources to test every single RAM module out there, they usually just grab a handful to determine max speeds, timings and voltages. As long as the RAM you buy meets these requirements you are good. And the common mistake is not that you don't pay attention to your "motherboard catalog" is that people don't buy matching sets of RAM. ALWAYS buy matching sets of RAM.

2. PSU gotta be good as well. You need to see the amount of Wattage that your GPU needs. But for example, at NVIDIA website they usually recomend a PSU that all your system may need including thermo-eletric coolers, HDDs, SSDs and all the stuff. The secret is to get a good brand like suggested by the others.
Just remember that quality matters as much as quantity does. And the PSU is one area where you really do get what you pay for. If you see a "Gold Rate d 750W" PSU for $65? Red flag automatically. But the same PSU for over $120 is generally a pretty safe bet for the most part. Make sure that you do your research before buying.
 
Reactions: PC Tailor

parkour47

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Jul 22, 2011
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That really applies across the board... Not the motherboard, I mean as though life were a game of chess. Always study your opponent before making a move and always do your research before buying.
 
Jun 30, 2019
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Well Thank You All
I think i chose the right forum to ask on
and I finally decided whats my gaming pc would be
I hope I can make some profit from twitch before buying that 2k$ Legendary PC

Decided to get:
Cpu: intel i7-9700K
Motherboard: Gigabyte Z390 Aorus Elite
Ram: HyperX Predator RGB 2x8GB DDR4 2933MHz CL15 Kit
Gpu: Gigabyte nVidia Rtx2060
Ssd: samsung 860 evo 1TB
Power supply: FSP Hydro G 650W modular 80+ gold
Case: FSP CMT510
 
Reactions: oneGamerE

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