Question Newbie's First Major Overhaul

ItsZanoniBro

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Good morning Tom's hardware system experts.

I went to go ahead and maintain this 8 year old beauty (she ran great for years) yesterday and a couple original errors I made installing the liquid cooler and it's mount have finally come back to bite me in the behind. I can no longer get it to sit properly on top of the chip, and instead of throw more four letter words at it that would make a sailor blush, It's about time I learn how to upgrade a system as I've been calling myself a home-build enthusiast for the last 8years after opening the case... a dozen times, maybe?

I prefer intel chipset products, but if you are well versed in AMD, please don't let that stop you from stopping in.

Here's the relics we're working with. I have case fans and all that junk too, but here's the meat and potatoes of what I'm talking about upgrading. I also have very generic questions for you guys after the fact that are straight up embarrassing, and a "hey rookie, here's what to do when you're upgrading your motherboard/CPU for the first time," article that you guys know of that are encyclopedias of info would probably do wonders for me. Without further ado:

Intel Core i7-4790K Processor
Asus Z97 Motherboard - Intel Socket LGA1150
Rosewill CAPSTONE Series ATX 12V/EPS 12V 750W 80 Plus Gold Certified Power Supply
Kingston HyperX FURY 16GB Kit (2x8GB) 1866MHz DDR3 CL10 DIMM - Black (HX318C10FBK2/16) (Computers & Accessories)
ASUS GeForce GTX 1060 3GB Dual-Fan OC Edition Graphics Card (DUAL-GTX1060-O3G)
Will obviously upgrade cooler based on new chip/motherboard potential?

-Here's what I can't do - determine the most cost effective and easiest way to do this. If it's simply following what my preferences are and what works together, I think I can figure it out. But my question is that if I'm switching from the hardware above, is there a hardware I should be targeting to make my life much simpler?

-I know they don't even support 1150 anymore, so obviously the CPU and motherboard are almost MUST upgrades. I know this is going to be the bulk of my cost. Does it matter what you upgrade TO from the old kit? PSU constraints aside, obviously. If

-For my gaming needs, the GPU can wait for a bit at least (I'm casual at this point), but I want to make sure my next MOBO is compatible with the older GPU, as well at maybe an upgrade in the future.

-I will gladly upgrade my ram to even up to 32gb just the way I moved from 8-16 when I didn't need it but eventually grew into and the PSU seems fine if I'm just upgrading the MOBO and CPU. right? I mean it's a little younger than the rest of the system, but if you suggest a 5+ year old PSU is stupid to keep with new hardware coming in, I'll swap it too. Assuming the 2x16 would be the way to go if all things status quo from when I first did this.

-Show me your cool cases that can fit all of this junk - I need a new look after this one looks very 2014 newbie-ish. Cable management will be more prideful this go around, but something glass seems good too.

ALL recommendations would be considered when I'm looking to spend about $1,000, even up to $1,500 if necessary - but it's just an everyday computer for an owner that likes a casual gaming build I don't want to really maintain or add to too much over the next 8 years (GPU upgrade potential aside).

Here are some of my ROOKIE questions that can probably be answered in guides that exist - swapping out chip and MOBO, do I need a new license of Windows even if all of my hard drives are the same? Do I need to do something special to my hard drives before I just start running them on a different chipset? Will I just be able to plug and play my old hard drives and games installed on them just work? I'm assuming I should uninstall and reinstall these things to optimize any new chipset, etc...

I'm assuming there's a rabbit hole of stuff here, but any guides/advice for AFTER I figure out the whole hardware problem would be much much much appreciated. Feel free to skip all of my other rambling questions and just post links to articles that you found helpful when you maybe this this the first time?

To reiterate how rookie I am, basically I have no idea (or confidence) of where to start once my new toy parts arrive. Do I just disconnect my GPU, yank out (figure of speech) my hard drives and PSU and assemble the new stuff, boot up and run BIOS? Can it be that simple?

I'm always a long winded guy, so if you make it to the end I know you mean well and I love you to death. Thanks again for taking a look!

-Z
 
You clearly need 3 major new parts: Motherboard, CPU, RAM.

For an Intel setup, 500 to 600 would go a long way for those 3. As a baseline, look at a microATX motherboard with a B660 chipset, perhaps Gigabyte or MSI. The CPU might be Intel i5-12600K. Ram DDR4 or DDR 5; a kit of 2 sticks totaling 16 GB. DDR 5 is a bit more expensive for minimal gain. Moving to 32 is possible, but not high priority.

Intel "13th generation" CPUs (13000 series) are gradually coming on the market; more in January; possible you could use 13th gen rather than above mentioned 12th if budget allows, but not high priority.

Plug those parts into your wish list and possibly adjust them if budget forces less or allows more after you consider other parts you need.

Power supply: to be determined; possibly keep what you have.

"Casual gaming"? Tentatively stay with current GPU.

Windows: Are you now on Windows 7 or 10? You will need to do a "clean install" of Windows, wiping everything from the existing boot drive. Back up any personal data you don't want to lose.

Case; likely standard mid-tower with good airflow. Lots of candidates; Lian-Li, Fractal Design, etc. Decide if you want all metal or a glass window and shop within your budget. Perhaps 75 to 125?

CPU cooler. Some Intel CPUs come with a stock cooler that most here would replace. Standard advice would be a single tower air cooler from someone like Be Quiet or Noctua with a 120 mm or 140 mm fan on it. Maybe 75 bucks or so?

Hard drives; avoid standard spinning hard drives if possible. Go with SSD. Consider your TOTAL capacity requirements. Don't get highly concerned with the NVMe/SATA/2.5 inch/M.2 2280 distinctions. Most would point you toward an M.2 boot drive for Windows and installed applications. Possibly use 2 drives total where the second larger one for personal data could be standard 2.5 inch SATA. Not a big deal assuming you have chosen correct capacities. Crucial, Samsung, Western Digital, Intel.

All of that probably raises more questions. Just my first rambling thoughts. Take your time. Make a tentative list of components that we can evaluate and pick apart.

Will you buy from Amazon? Newegg? How soon?
 
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ItsZanoniBro

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As I digest a lot of that, I mean I can buy them today if something looks cool and affordable and feasible that I may have time this week to work on it... otherwise I'll wait more towards black friday/cyber Monday for some deals I'm sure that will come from that. I've used Newegg and Amazon both in the past, but if you want to steer me a direction for an advantage, I'm all ears.

It sounds like I'm going to have to figure out a way to get this stock heat sink found and back on so I can run the dammed thing and back up my boot drive. The screws (or custom backing plate for them) are so stripped, or warped, or whatever because if you think I'm bad now with this stuff, that kid 8 years ago basically put the whole thing together with a hammer and saw...

I really appreciate the time, I'll be back here with anything else that pops up along the way here and thanks for getting me started officially.
 
I would NOT expect Black Friday/Cyber Monday to necessarily be a factor. What will show up at a significant price reduction is rank speculation.

Some Intel 13th generation "locked" CPUs will be out in late January. 13600, 13700, etc. Might give you a 10 percent improvement for a bit more money, but not a factor if you have to build before that or if you want a 13th generation K suffix CPU (13600K, 13700K).

Are you currently in an unbootable state?

Windows 7 or 10 on current boot drive?
 
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ItsZanoniBro

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Windows 10, just need to get the chip to cool - none of my peripherals are firing and my RAM light is saying it's no good (never had a RAM problem, I tried booting it up with each one solo and I got the same thing) so I think it's just the fact the chip knows its temp knows is going to skyrocket and won't keep going through its boot menu?

I troubleshot this trying to get my cooler to sit properly (reapplied thermal paste etc...) but I simply can't remove it to properly care for it without ruining the sockets it's in on the MB, and I can't get parts of it to lock down properly against the CPU, so it's probably the "rip it out and hope the old one can still fit here" strategy... I'll see.
 

Vic 40

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It sounds like I'm going to have to figure out a way to get this stock heat sink found and back on so I can run the dammed thing and back up my boot drive. The screws (or custom backing plate for them) are so stripped, or warped, or whatever because if you think I'm bad now with this stuff, that kid 8 years ago basically put the whole thing together with a hammer and saw...
Maybe invest in an already good cpu cooler and take it to your new system when you have all the parts.
 

ItsZanoniBro

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Awesome - guys thanks so much for these resources. I will keep looking at them.

Basic logistics - lets say I get a brand new SDD to basically make a brand new computer - can I plug in my old SDD boot drive to pull stuff off of it after? Or is it best I format that before it ever meets the new one?

I'm just looking for the cleanest way to do that part too if you guys don't mind. I figure if I can get up a brand new PC, I'll figure out how to get a discounted windows, start from scratch, and slowly migrate stuff over from the old SDDs...?

Any problems there? Eventually I'm sure I'll format them and integrate them after everything's copied I need to the new one...

Thanks again all. This community is one of the best things for us part time hobbyists, I can't express my gratitude enough for everyone that takes the time.
 

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I see an Intel build so want to show what AMD can be like,

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 5700X 3.4 GHz 8-Core Processor ($230.75 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Thermalright Assassin X 120 Refined SE 66.17 CFM CPU Cooler ($19.89 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI MPG X570 GAMING PLUS ATX AM4 Motherboard ($146.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: TEAMGROUP T-Create Expert 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($40.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: PNY CS2140 1 TB M.2-2280 PCIe 4.0 X4 NVME Solid State Drive ($76.99 @ Best Buy)
Video Card: Sapphire PULSE Radeon RX 6700 10 GB Video Card ($319.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Focus 2 RGB ATX Mid Tower Case ($63.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair RM750x (2021) 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($109.11 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: ARCTIC P12 56.3 CFM 120 mm Fan ($9.42 @ Amazon)
Total: $1018.11
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2022-11-14 16:05 EST-0500


Includes a better gpu so thee are possibilities, and yes abit over your lower budget. Some upgrades to this are for example 32 gb of ram,
https://pcpartpicker.com/product/dWH8TW/team-t-force-vulcan-z-32-gb-2-x-16-gb-ddr4-3600-cl18-memory-tlzrd432g3600hc18jdc
or maybe another better cpu cooler.

You can reuse your old windows, just tie it to your Microsoft account on the old pc (if you don't have one create one) and reinstall on the new pc, sell the old without windows for what you can get for it or keep it as back up.
 
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Basic logistics - lets say I get a brand new SDD to basically make a brand new computer - can I plug in my old SDD boot drive to pull stuff off of it after? Or is it best I format that before it ever meets the new one?

I'm just looking for the cleanest way to do that part too if you guys don't mind. I figure if I can get up a brand new PC, I'll figure out how to get a discounted windows, start from scratch, and slowly migrate stuff over from the old SDDs...?

Any problems there? Eventually I'm sure I'll format them and integrate them after everything's copied I need to the new one...
Here's the way I would do it, assuming you buy a new motherboard and CPU:

Copy any personal data files you need to keep from your existing drive....pictures, video, spaghetti recipes, browser bookmarks, email, mp3s, whatever you have, wherever they are.

Make a Windows 10 installer USB stick via Microsoft's "Media Creation Tool". You need a USB stick of at least 8 GB capacity.

Confirm it will boot your PC.

Disconnect all drives other than the one to receive Windows.

Boot from the installer USB stick.

Delete all partitions from the drive when shown the opportunity early in the process. Windows will reboot and make partitions as it sees fit.

When it finishes, confirm you can boot from the new hard drive installation with the USB installer removed.

Activate the new installation.

If you can get that far, reconnect other drives and do as you wish with them. They should appear as D, E, F, etc. Copy back whatever you copied off the old drive earlier.
 

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