[SOLVED] Demanding games crash after a while of playing

leksaloffe

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Jul 12, 2018
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Ive had this problem for a while now where if I'm playing a game with high-ish graphics or the game overall is quite demanding, my whole computer will freeze after a while of playing. For example I had these crashes on CSGO when my settings were completely maxed out, but once I lowered the graphics to medium, I never had a crash again. Now I've started Valorant and I keep getting these crashes after maybe 45 minutes of playing.

I'm wondering if the problem is in my old PSU or old HDD? All my other components are absolutely fine, but the HDD and PSU are both about 10 years old.

Specs:
CPU - Ryzen 5 2600 @3,85GHz
Motherboard - Asus TUF B450-PLUS GAMING
GPU - GTX 1050 Ti Gaming X
RAM - Trident Z RGB 16GB(2x8GB) DDR4 3200MHz
PSU - Cooler Master GX 650W 80+ Bronze (from around ~2010)
HDD - WD Green 1TB HDD 5400RPM (from around ~2010)

My temperatures are fine, I dont have an SSD (but even then, booting up my computer takes about 15 minutes which is insane).
The crashes are in a way where the game freezes completely, sound cuts off, both my monitors just freeze (they dont go black) and I cant do anything other than forcefully shut my computer down.

Do you think the problem is my HDD or PSU?
 
What do you think about my HDD speeds? Are they horrible? (CrystalDiskMark 6)
Do you think I should completely replace my HDD with an SSD? Or would it help if I got an NVMe M.2 SSD for now and put windows on that? I'm quite tight on money right now, so I'm wondering if I should spend 40 euros now on a smaller SSD (M.2) or save up for a bit and get a 100 euro, 1TB SSD to replace my HDD later?
I'd ditch the HD completely if possible. You don't need it and it's slow as h3ll. The size of the SSD depends on your storage needs. Only you can answer that. Alternatively, you could use a smaller SSD for windows and programs and move non-critical files to the HD as a secondary storage device. Avoid getting an SSD that's too small. You don't want to install everything on it and have no room left.

You will still need a new PSU also, but if it's working right now, the most benefit will be the SSD. A clean installation of windows and programs on a new SSD could also fix some of the issues you're having, if they're related to software. The best result would be to replace the HD and PSU at the same time but I understand if budget is a problem.
 
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Ive had this problem for a while now where if I'm playing a game with high-ish graphics or the game overall is quite demanding, my whole computer will freeze after a while of playing. For example I had these crashes on CSGO when my settings were completely maxed out, but once I lowered the graphics to medium, I never had a crash again. Now I've started Valorant and I keep getting these crashes after maybe 45 minutes of playing.

I'm wondering if the problem is in my old PSU or old HDD? All my other components are absolutely fine, but the HDD and PSU are both about 10 years old.

Specs:
CPU - Ryzen 5 2600 @3,85GHz
Motherboard - Asus TUF B450-PLUS GAMING
GPU - GTX 1050 Ti Gaming X
RAM - Trident Z RGB 16GB(2x8GB) DDR4 3200MHz
PSU - Cooler Master GX 650W 80+ Bronze (from around ~2010)
HDD - WD Green 1TB HDD 5400RPM (from around ~2010)

My temperatures are fine, I dont have an SSD (but even then, booting up my computer takes about 15 minutes which is insane).
The crashes are in a way where the game freezes completely, sound cuts off, both my monitors just freeze (they dont go black) and I cant do anything other than forcefully shut my computer down.

Do you think the problem is my HDD or PSU?
I'd replace them both. The HD is so slow and the PSU is old. Neither were very good even when new. There's not much reason for anyone to use an old clunker HD anymore except for low priority bulk storage. A 1TB NVME SSD is not very expensive now and will be such a big improvement over what you have you'll be amazed. A higher quality power supply from Corsair, Super Flower or Seasonic will last a long time. Cooler master only has a couple good PSU's and those are at the high end expensive side of their lineup.

Your issues may not be related to hardware and could be driver problems so you may not need new parts to actually fix it but the system would benefit from some upgrades.
 

leksaloffe

Reputable
Jul 12, 2018
108
0
4,710
7
I'd replace them both. The HD is so slow and the PSU is old. Neither were very good even when new. There's not much reason for anyone to use an old clunker HD anymore except for low priority bulk storage. A 1TB NVME SSD is not very expensive now and will be such a big improvement over what you have you'll be amazed. A higher quality power supply from Corsair, Super Flower or Seasonic will last a long time. Cooler master only has a couple good PSU's and those are at the high end expensive side of their lineup.

Your issues may not be related to hardware and could be driver problems so you may not need new parts to actually fix it but the system would benefit from some upgrades.
What do you think about my HDD speeds? Are they horrible? (CrystalDiskMark 6)
Do you think I should completely replace my HDD with an SSD? Or would it help if I got an NVMe M.2 SSD for now and put windows on that? I'm quite tight on money right now, so I'm wondering if I should spend 40 euros now on a smaller SSD (M.2) or save up for a bit and get a 100 euro, 1TB SSD to replace my HDD later?
 
What do you think about my HDD speeds? Are they horrible? (CrystalDiskMark 6)
Do you think I should completely replace my HDD with an SSD? Or would it help if I got an NVMe M.2 SSD for now and put windows on that? I'm quite tight on money right now, so I'm wondering if I should spend 40 euros now on a smaller SSD (M.2) or save up for a bit and get a 100 euro, 1TB SSD to replace my HDD later?
I'd ditch the HD completely if possible. You don't need it and it's slow as h3ll. The size of the SSD depends on your storage needs. Only you can answer that. Alternatively, you could use a smaller SSD for windows and programs and move non-critical files to the HD as a secondary storage device. Avoid getting an SSD that's too small. You don't want to install everything on it and have no room left.

You will still need a new PSU also, but if it's working right now, the most benefit will be the SSD. A clean installation of windows and programs on a new SSD could also fix some of the issues you're having, if they're related to software. The best result would be to replace the HD and PSU at the same time but I understand if budget is a problem.
 
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